1 designing and developing a blended course veronica diaz, phd, drvdiaz@gmail.comdrvdiaz@gmail.com

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  • Segment 1:An Overview of Blended Learning and Redesign

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    What is blended learning?Blended learning courses combine online and classroom learning activities and resources in an optimal way to improve student learning outcomes and to address important institutional issues.

    Classroom attendance (seat time) is reduced.

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    Blended Format DefinitionsSloan-C, 2007

    Proportion of Content Delivered OnlineType of CourseTypical Description0% TraditionalCourse with no online technology used content is delivered in writing or orally.

    1 to 29% Web FacilitatedCourse which uses web-based technology to facilitate what is essentially a face-to-face course. Uses a course management system (CMS) or web pages to post the syllabus and assignments, for example.

    30 to 79%Blended/HybridCourse that blends online and face-to-face delivery. Substantial proportion of the content is delivered online, typically uses online discussions, and typically has some face-to-face meetings.

    80% +OnlineA course where most or all of the content is delivered online. Typically have no face-to-face meetings.

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    Why blended learning?A way to meet Net Gen student expectationsAttractive alternative to Face2Face instructionA good match for the Net Gens visual, exploratory, participative learning preferencesUsually more work to design (at least at the beginning), but improved student engagement and achievementThe best of both worlds

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    The Optimal ModelTeaching OpportunitiesEnables the incorporation of new types of interactive and independent learning activities Variety of online and in-class teaching strategiesLearn technologies while you learn your material Student EngagementPotential to increase and extend instructor-student and student-student connectivity Students who rarely take part in class discussions are more likely to participate onlineIntegration of out-of- and in-class activities allows more effective use of traditional class time

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    NATIONAL DATA REPORTSThe Sloan Consortium

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    What does blended mean?

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    Selecting Technologies

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    THE 10 BLENDED QUESTIONSAs a Guide Throughout

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    10 Blended QuestionsWhat do you want students to know when they have finished taking your blended course? [learning outcomes]

    As you think about learning objectives, which would be better achieved online and which would be best achieved face-to-face? [delivery mode and learning outcomes]

    Blended teaching is not just a matter of transferring a portion of your traditional course to the Web. Instead it involves developing challenging and engaging online learning activities that complement your face-to-face activities. What types of learning activities do you think you will be using for the online portion of your course? [integration]Online asynchronous discussion is often an important part of blended courses. What new learning opportunities will arise as a result of using asynchronous discussion? What challenges do you anticipate in using online discussions? How would you address these? [building and maintaining community]

    How will the face-to-face and time out of class components be integrated into a single course? In other words, how will the work done in each component feed back into and support the other? [integration and accountability]

    When working online, students frequently have problems scheduling their work and managing their time, and understanding the implications of the blended course module as related to learning. What do you plan to do to help your students address these issues? student readiness and crisis points]

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    10 Blended QuestionsHow will you divide the percent of time between the face-to-face portion and the online portion of your course? How will you schedule the percent of time between the face-to-face and online portion of your course, i.e. one two hour face-to-face followed by one two hour online session each week? [flow and delivery mode optimization]

    How will you divide the course-grading scheme between face-to-face and online activities? What means will you use to assess student work in each of these two components? [assessment and accountability] Students sometimes have difficulty acclimating to the course Web site and to other instructional technologies you may be using for face-to-face and online activities. What specific technologies will you use for the online and face-to-face portions of your course? What proactive steps can you take to assist students to become familiar with your Web site and those instructional technologies? If students need help with technology later in the course, how will you provide support? [learning technologies and support/crisis points/readiness]

    There is a tendency for faculty to require students to do more work in a blended course than they normally would complete in a purely traditional course. What are you going to do to ensure that you have not created a course and one-half? How will you evaluate the student workload as compared to a traditional class? [design and integration]

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    What can it look like?The National Center for Academic Transformationhttp://www.thencat.orgReplacement Model Summaries: http://thencat.org/PCR/model_replace_all.htm Syllabi review on wiki Your own syllabi search

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    Blended Course ExamplesAmerican National Government (UCF) Introductory Astronomy (UCB) Economic Statistics (UIUC) General Chemistry (UI) Intermediate Spanish Transition (UTK) General Chemistry (UWM) College Composition (Tallahassee CC)Computer Literacy (U of Buffalo, SUNY) English Composition (BYU) General Psychology (CSU Pomona) Computer Programming (Drexel U)Elementary Statistics (Penn State U) Introductory Spanish (Portland State U) Elementary Algebra (Riverside CC)

    Six Innovative Course Redesign Practices

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    Activity I: Reviewing Blended Courses Browse blended course syllabiReview the NCAT redesign course examplesWhat did you observe to be different in the traditional course from the blended course Identify 2 unique features of or instructional strategies used in blended courses

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    BREAK

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    What can be done F2F?Your IdeasMy Ideas

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    What can be done online/not F2F?Your IdeasMy Ideas

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    What is the IRAbetween these two?Your IdeasMy Ideas

  • Segment 2:Course Redesign*

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    Mapping Your CourseGive us a quick overview of how your face to face course maps outWhat do you think will translate most easily?What do you think will be most difficult to translate?*Resources: Assessing the Role of Teaching Presence from the Learner Perspective. Dr. Randy Garrison, Dr. Norm Vaughan. Available at Blended Learning and Course Redesign in Higher Education & http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI07159.pdf.

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    Blooms Taxonomy Focus on learner

    Focus on measure of learning

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    Blooms Digital Taxonomy

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    5 Principles of Successful Course RedesignRedesign the whole course.Encourage active learning.Provide students with individualized assistance.Build in ongoing assessment and prompt feedback.Ensure sufficient time on task and monitor student progress.http://thencat.org/PlanRes/R2R_PrinCR.htm

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    4 Basic Redesign StepsIdentify course content for a moduleWrite learning objectives and develop instructional modulesSelect course delivery strategies: determine which strategy is most appropriate for your contentIntegrate course content activities in classroom and online environments: determine what is best suited in either the online or classroom environment

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    Why Objectives?Clear statement of what students will be able to do when they are finished with an instructional segmentFocuses on student performanceProvides structure: beginning, middle, and end

    What are the core concepts your students must learn for each module?What do they need to know?What do they need to be able to do?What will they know as a result of my instruction?

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    Support Objectives byIntegrating learning technologies Classroom technologiesEmerging technologies Online resources Developing diverse assessment techniques Infusing active learning, interaction, and peer engagement

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    Meeting Objectives

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    Course OrganizationDatesTopicReadings SectionUnitModule

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    The OrganizationCourse structure set up in a repetitive manner allowing for easy navigationCourse content broken down into chunks Supports consistencyAllows students to focus on content rather than form7 +/-2 ruleContent organized in conceptually related blocksLet the content set the chunksSource: Blending In, March 2007

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    Activity II: Mapping Your CourseHandout: Mapping your CourseDebrief homework ID what you doID what the learner doesSelect one chunk/module

  • Segment 3: Quality in the Blended CourseQuality Matters: http://www.qualitymatters.org/index.htm

    Other Quality Measures/Tools: http://blendedlearning101.pbworks.com/Course-Evaluation-Rubrics-Resources

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    Why Quality MattersStep-by-step guide for development Checklist for developed coursesEnsure alignment Student perspective

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    The Quality Matters Frame1) Learning Objectives CourseModule Clear, students perspective Measurable Instructions to students on how to meet them

    **Alignment to objectives 2) Learner EngagementSufficient to support objectives Diverse3 types of interaction Response time Requirements, rubrics, and samples

    **Alignment to objectives

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    The Quality Matters Frame3) Resources/MaterialsMaterials support objectivesRelationship between materials and objectives is clear to studentsBreadth, depth, currency Diversity Citation and copyright

    **Alignment to objectives 4) Assessment/MeasurementMeasure progress toward objectives Grading policySpecific, d

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