20140119 in the shadow of malthus - grasping reality with both … · 2014-01-19 ·...

Click here to load reader

Post on 25-Mar-2020

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • In  the  Shadow  of  Malthus  

    J.  Bradford  DeLong  UC  Berkeley  

  • Required  Readings  •  Rick  Steckel  (2008),  "Biological  Measures  of  the  Standard  of  Living",  

    Journal  of  Economic  Perspec2ves  22:1  (Winter),  pp.  129-‐52  hLp://www.aeaweb.org/arPcles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.22.1.129  

    •  Thomas  Malthus  (1798),  An  Essay  on  the  Principle  of  Popula2on,  Chapters  1-‐2,  pp.1-‐11,  Electronic  Scholarly  Publishing  Project,  1998.  hLp://www.esp.org/books/malthus/populaPon/malthus.pdf  

    •  Gregory  Clark  (2007),  A  Farewell  to  Alms:  A  Brief  Economic  History  of  the  World,  Chapter  2,  “The  Logic  of  the  Malthusian  Economy,”  pp.  19-‐39  and  Chapter  3,  “Living  Standards,”  pp.  40-‐70.  Princeton:  Princeton  University  Press.  On  reserve  at  Graduate  Services.  An  earlier  dra`  (not  preferred)  is  available  at  hLp://Pnyurl.com/dl20090112e  (chapter  2)  and  hLp://Pnyurl.com/dl20090112j  (chapter  3)  

  • Richard  H.  Steckel  (2008),  "Biological  Measures  of  the  Standard  of  Living”  

    •  When  economists  invesPgate  long-‐term  trends  and  socioeconomic  differences  in  the  standard  of  living  or  quality  of  life,  they  have  tradiPonally  focused  on  monetary  measures  such  as  gross  domesPc  product  -‐-‐  which  has  occupied  center  stage  for  over  50  years.  In  recent  decades,  however,  scholars  have  increasingly  recognized  the  limitaPons  of  monetary  measures  while  seeking  useful  alternaPves.  This  essay  examines  the  unique  and  valuable  contribuPons  of  four  biological  measures  -‐-‐  life  expectancy,  morbidity,  stature,  and  certain  features  of  skeletal  remains  -‐-‐  to  understand  levels  and  changes  in  human  well-‐being.  People  desire  far  more  than  material  goods  and  in  fact  they  are  quite  willing  to  trade  or  give  up  material  things  in  return  for  beLer  physical  or  psychological  health.  For  most  people,  health  is  so  important  to  their  quality  of  life  that  it  is  useful  to  refer  to  the  "biological  standard  of  living."  Biological  measures  may  be  especially  valuable  for  historical  studies  and  for  other  research  circumstances  where  monetary  measures  are  thin  or  lacking.  A  concluding  secPon  ruminates  on  the  future  evoluPon  of  biological  approaches  in  measuring  happiness.  

  • The  Coming  of  Agriculture  

  • Agricultural  PlantaJon  Slavery  

  • Health  and  Wealth  

  • Demography  Before  Modern  Economic  Growth  

  • What  Does  It  Mean  for  a  Human  PopulaJon  to  Grow  at  Only  1%/GeneraJon?  

    •  A  hunter-‐gatherer  populaPon?  •  An  agricultural  populaPon?  •  An  industrial/post-‐industrial  populaPon?  

  • Nasty,  BruJsh,  and  Short  •  The  phrase  is  Thomas  

    Hobbes’s  •  Modern  standard  of  living  

    is  worth  10  cm.  •  PracPcally  every  non-‐

    aristo  skeleton  from  our  agrarian  past  is  really  short  –  ExcepPons:  fish  eaters  –  ExcepPons:  Souix  –  ExcepPons:  Hunter-‐

    gatherers  •  What  does  being  10  cm.  

    shorter  do  to  brain  development?  

  • Demography  Before  and  During  Modern  Economic  Growth  

  • Thomas  Malthus  (1798),  An  Essay  on  the  Principle  of  PopulaJon  

    •  “Let  us  imagine  for  a  moment  Mr.  Godwin's  beauPful  system  of  equality  realized  in  its  utmost  purity…”  – William  Godwin,  Enquiry  Concerning  Poli2cal  Jus2ce  – Marie  Jean  Antoine  Nicolas  de  Caritat,  Marquis  de  Condorcet,  Sketch  for  a  Historical  Picture  of  the  Progress  of  the  Human  Mind  

    •  Demography  pins  the  standard  of  living  to  “subsistence”  as  long  as  technological  progress  is  “slow”  

    •  G.W.F.  Hegel:  “die  Eule  der  Minerva  beginnt  erst  mit  der  einbrechenden  Dämmerung  ihren  Flug”  –  “The  owl  of  Minerva  flies  only  at  dusk”  

  • Gregory  Clark:  “The  Logic  of  the  Malthusian  Economy”  and  “Living  Standards”  

    •  A  Farewell  to  Alms:  A  Brief  Economic  History  of  the  World,  chapters  2  and  3  – “From  1340  to  1680  the  populaPon  of  the  major  European  countries  actually  fell  slightly…  the  average  number  of  surviving  children  per  woman…  ranged  from  1.90  in  the  Netherlands  to  1.99  in  France…”  

    – Figure  6  live  births  per  adult  woman…  

  • Living  Standards  Across  Time  and  Space  from  Clark  (2007)  

  • Direct  EsJmates  of  Long-‐Run  Real  Wage  Trends  

    •  We  know  what  monks  paid  their  construcPon  workers.  

    •  We  know  what  bread  and  other  staples  cost.  

    •  QuesPons  about  whether  these  workers  are  in  any  sense  representaPve  

  • A  Malthusian  Economy?  When  and  Why?  

    •  We  are  not  terribly  unhappy  with  our  populaPon  esPmates.  

    •  We  are  unhappy  with  our  esPmates  of  modern  economic  growth  –  But  the  thing  itself  exists  –  And  before  MEG  there  must  have  been  living  standard  stagnaPon  

    •  Those  together  imply  the  picture  that  we  have.  

  • Malthus’s  Policy  RecommendaJons  

    •  All  of  the  acPon  is  in  Csub,  therefore...  

    •  Delaying  the  start  of  sexual  acPvity  humanity’s  only  chance:  –  Patriarchy  –  Theocracy  – Monarchy  

    •  a  most  disheartening  reflecPon  that  the  great  obstacle  in  the  way  to  any  extraordinary  improvement  in  society  is  of  a  nature  that  we  can  never  hope  to  overcome.....  Yet,  discouraging  as  the  contemplaPon  of  this  difficulty  must  be  to  those  whose  exerPons  are  laudably  directed  to  the  improvement  of  the  human  species,  it  is  evident  that  no  possible  good  can  arise  from  any  endeavours  to  slur  it  over  or  keep  it  in  the  background.    

    •  On  the  contrary,  the  most  baleful  mischiefs  may  be  expected  from  the  unmanly  conduct  of  not  daring  to  face  truth  because  it  is  unpleasing....  [I]f  we  unwisely  direct  our  efforts  towards  an  object  in  which  we  cannot  hope  for  success,  we  shall  not  only  exhaust  our  strength  in  fruitless  exerPons  and  remain  at  as  great  a  distance  as  ever  from  the  summit  of  our  wishes,  but  we  shall  be  perpetually  crushed  by  the  recoil  of  this  rock  of  Sisyphus...  

  • Malthus’s  Theory  

    •  A  preLy  good  theory  as  of  1800...  

    •  Not  at  all  a  good  theory  as  of  1850...  

    •  An  absolutely  lousy  theory  as  of  today...  – Or  is  it?