5.6 substructure 5.6.2 5.6.1 introduction

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Stage C Building Engineering Report
REP002 | Issue | 20 December 2013
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Page 18
5.6 Substructure
5.6.1 Introduction
The substructure consists of a single existing basement level that extends across the full footprint of the building and an additional three new partial levels of basement at the south- west of the site.. Figure 26 shows a short section and plan view of the proposed new basement. The basement will accommodate gym areas on levels B2 and B3, with B3 also supporting a 1.9m deep swimming pool. The lowest level, B4 will predominantly contain plant. There is also a 3-level automatic car parker sandwiched between level B1 slab and level B3 slab, as shown in Figure 26.
Figure 26: Section and plan view of new basement
5.6.2 Basement wall construction
The new basement will be approximately 18m deep making it relatively deep for London. It is below groundwater level and must therefore resist substantial hydrostatic as well as retained earth pressures.
Figure 27 shows the build-up of the proposed secant pile retaining wall. The piles which make up the walls parallel to the streets (Draycott Avenue, Ixworth Place and Sloane Avenue) are 900mm diameter. The wall parallel to the Thames Water sewer will need to be 1200m diameter to limit movements of the Thames Water sewer. They will also be deeper than the typical piles.
It can be seen in Figure 27 that the inside face of the basement wall should be 2500mm from an existing vertical face. This dimension allows for a 1.2m piling rig clearance as well as the piling tolerances and drained cavity wall build up. The piling rig clearance is necessary as the proposal is to remove the ground floor slab and then pile from the B1 level. Vertical obstructions such as the existing RC retaining wall and contiguous wall will need to be avoided.
Parallel to Ixworth Place, extra basement area is required to accommodate the swimming pool on level B3. It is proposed that B1 level will be partially backfilled in order to allow the piling rig to pile from ground level. Doing so will mean no vertical obstruction will exist hence the 1.2m piling rig clearance can be disregarded. Nevertheless, a 400mm wide pile guide wall should be allowed for. This reduces the offset from the existing basement wall to 2150mm. Refer to the Construction Traffic Management Plan (Arup, Nov 2013) for further details.
Figure 27: Form of basement wall and setting out
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As can be seen in Figure 26, there will be an 8.6m deep car stacking system between level B1 slab and level B3. Typically the basement floor slabs, which are 4 to 5m vertically apart, will act as intermediate props for the new secant wall.
In the car stacking area buttress walls and waling beams are required to allow the wall to effectively span the full 8.6m. Figure 28 shows how the support for the secant wall will work within the basement. The waling beam will be required at mid-height of the wall section within the car park.
Figure 28: Secant wall support system within the car park stacker
5.6.3 Raft foundation
In order to resist heave pressures due to the deep basement excavation, a raft foundation will be adopted as the foundation solution for the new deep basement. The raft will be 1200mm to spread the columns loads sufficiently and to offset the heave pressures.
It is important that the basement remains dry, therefore any water ingress that may occur through the concrete will need to be drained away. This is will be catered for by drained cavity walls and floors, that drain away into sumps.
5.6.4 Storey height transfer wall in B1
To suit the arrangement of car parking palettes in the automatic car parking system, described in section 5.6.2, a storey height wall will be required to transfer load from a column that would otherwise clash with the car spaces. This is shown in Figure 29.
Ground level B1 level B2/B3 level
Figure 29: Storey height wall transfer required above car park stacker
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5.6.5 Basement depth and uplift
The depth of the basement is limited due to the uplift effect from the hydrostatic head of groundwater and strict tolerances to movement of the adjacent Thames Water tunnel.
To meet the requirements for clear floor to ceiling heights in the new basement and assuming a 1.2m deep raft foundation the underside of the raft will be at -12.43mOD, marginally lower than the Thames Water tunnel invert of -10.8mOD.
The preliminary site investigation found the ground water level to be at -1.5mOD. Allowing for seasonal effects the design ground water level has been taken as a meter higher than the actual ground water level, resulting in 14.9m of hydrostatic ground water head. The buoyant force of water at this level will exert a upwards pressure of ~150kN/m² on the underside of the raft.
To avoid tensions piles, the down force from the permanent weight of the building must result in a greater downward pressure. A calculation has shown an overall downwards pressure of 165kN/ m², which provides an adequate factor of safety against flotation.
Figure 30: Uplift vs. downforce assessment
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5.7.1 Introduction
The north-east half of the building will be supported on piles at basement B1 level. The intention is to reuse the existing piles in this area, however due to the rearrangement of cores and increases in loads certain pile caps will need to be removed and or strengthened with supplementary piles.
Interventions to existing pilecaps spanning over the Thames Water tunnel are to be minimised as modifications in this area could have an adverse effect on the tunnel that Thames Water will not accept. Figure 31 indicates which pile caps can remain in place without strengthening.
A preliminary load run down has determined that the load increase on the pile caps highlighted green in Figure 31 is less than 10% and are therefore likely to be suitable for re- use. However the caps highlighted in red will need to be removed and reconfigured due to the load increases. Pilecaps highlighted in orange will require supplementary piling to withstand the new loads. This is likely to be in the form of mini-piles, and reconstructed pilecaps.
Figure 31: Existing pile reuse
5.7.2 Foundation re-use strategy fundamentals
Initial load balance appraisal suggest that it should be possible to re-use existing foundations where the new loads do not exceed the realistic existing loads by more than 10%. However, further investigative survey work will be required to determine the geometry and condition of the existing foundations.
The pile caps that bridge over the tunnel provide a confining effect and so removal of these will release overburden pressure on which the tunnel is relying for its integrity. Some pilecaps over the tunnel will need to be removed and reconfigured due to the change in building grid and loads. At this stage it is felt that retaining the caps highlighted green in Figure 31 will be sufficient to confine the tunnel. This will be assessed in further detail in the next design stage.
5.7.3 Summary of proposals and conclusions
The proposed works include adding two superstructure levels which results in an increase in load on the foundations. The existing pile cap arrangement at the west end of the tunnel includes three pile caps that support columns with a cantilever & backspan system (sown red in Figure 32 below. This form of support is very sensitive to load increases as the moment induced by the leverarm of the cantilever results in a load increase that is proportional to the distance to the backspan support.
It can be seen in Figure 32 that the secant pile wall (indicated by the blue dashed line) will cut through the existing pile caps. These caps will therefore need to be removed and a new system to transfer the loads onto these piles is required. The proposed solution is to construct a T- shape storey height wall to spread the load onto the piles that surround the tunnel. It was not possible to reconfigure the pile caps in a similar form as the existing arrangement because the load increase on the columns and cantilever spans result in an unacceptable load increase on the piles. By constructing the T-shape storey height wall the load from the columns will be distributed more evenly to the surrounding piles and it is expected that only four supplementary piles will be required.
Figure 32: Intervention required for cantilever & backspan pile caps
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5.8 Design Criteria
5.8.1 Design criteria
The following Sections 5.8 to 5.11 will form the basis of the Calculation Plan, which will be used as a guide for all subsequent structural design on the project, and will eventually form part of the Building Control submission along with the design calculations.
5.8.2 Design philosophy
Existing structural elements that will be retained and/or strengthened are:
Transfer pilecaps bridging over the Thames Water sewer and all of those to the nort-east of the tunnel;
piles with these pilecaps;
The existing five-storey historic façade and its foundation;
Retaining walls and slab at basement B1 level
Where the proposed structural works result in an increase in load on the above elements, an assessment into their capacity will be required. The assessment will be made using current Codes of Practice and British Standards. Existing material strengths and material safety factors will be based on Codes of Practice in use at the time of original design. Assumed values will be modified as appropriate following insitu testing.
This approach is common for refurbishment projects and will ensure sufficient robustness present within the proposed scheme.
Ultimate limit state design
The design of the building structure will be based upon Limit State design principles. Limit State design utilises Partial Factors of Safety being applied to materials and load combinations, in accordance with the relevant British Standards and Codes of Practice.
Partial Factors of Safety for the maximum (minimum) load effects are to be applied as follows:
(a) Dead Load Adverse 1.4
Beneficial (0.9)
Beneficial (0.0)
Beneficial (0.9)
Beneficial (0.9)
It should be noted that, although British Standards have been adopted thus far, future design calculations will be in accordance with Eurocodes as these are being phased in to supersede current British Standards.
5.8.3 Robustness and disproportionate collapse
Disproportionate collapse will be considered in accordance with Building Regulations Approved Document A: Dec 2004: Section 5. This document classifies structures based on usage, number of stories and/or floor areas.
Disproportionate collapse rules are used to ensure that if one part of the structure should fail, adjoining parts are sufficiently tied to ensure progressive collapse of the structure does not occur.
5.8.4 Design life
The structure will be designed and constructed in accordance with relevant British Standards to achieve a Design Life of 50 years. In this context, the term Design Life is understood to mean that, provided the structure is appropriately maintained, it will still meet the design criteria set out here at the end of this period.
At this stage it is not possible to make an assessment of the ‘residual design life’ of the existing elements that will be reused. This will be dependent on the current state of repair of these elements and the grade and mix of the concrete used in their construction.
As noted in Section 5.3Error! Reference source not found., the retained existing structure should be subject to a suite of survey and testing as a means of addressing this risk to the Client.
See Section 0 for further discussion on re-use of existing foundations.
For the purposes of the Stage C design, the existing structure to be retained is assumed to be in reasonable condition for its age and adequate for its current purpose.
5.8.5 Existing vertical loading
The existing vertical loads presented below have been assumed for the load rundown studies carried out on the building for the foundation re-use assessment. In this assessment, it is important to understand the actual loads to which the foundations have been subject over their life. These assumptions should be verified by site survey in advance of building strip-out in order to validate the assumptions on which the foundation re-use strategy is based.
Existing dead loads
Existing dead loads from the structure have been determined from available YRM Associates drawings and the ‘Integrating the old with the new’ article published in the Architects’ Journal. These were also corroborated with the Beers Consulting Engineers Ltd structural drawings obtained from the Health & Safety file for the 2008 4
th floor addition works.
The existing floors typically consist of a 325mm RC slab, which tapers to 200mm at the cantilever tips on the outermost column line. On ground level the floor is a 300mm slab with a
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grillage of 600mm wide, 650mm deep RC beams on the column grid. The basement level is a 150mm thick ground bearing RC slab.
Existing superimposed dead loads
Based on the use of the building, the superimposed dead loads have been assumed to consist of a 150mm raised floor and 575mm suspended ceiling and services zone.
Existing imposed loads
According to a letter from Beers Consulting Engineers Ltd dated 9 th
July 2007, a report was prepared by CBRE in May2002 for the buildings then freeholder to describe the overall condition of the building . The report included a section on design floor loads and was taken from original information available at that time. The report states that the typical floors have a live load allowance of 5.0kN/m². This load allowance is typical for office buildings designed in the 1990s.
Summary of existing floor loads assumed
Figure 33: Summary of existing loading assumed for typical floors
Existing cladding loads
The existing atrium has been assumed to consist of a sandstone and concrete 250mm thick build up with 15% clear glazing area. This results in a loading of 5.1kN/m² on elevation
The curtain walling installed in 1994 is supported by the floor slabs and is not load bearing like the existing historic terracotta façade. Curtina wall load is assumed as 1.0kN/m² on elevation.
5.8.6 Proposed vertical loading
Proposed superimposed dead loads
The proposed development will consist of high-end residential apartments and therefore heavy floor finishes such as stone with underfloor heating in screed may be required.
It is envisaged that blockwork walls (2.5kN/m² on plan) may be required to provide the necessary acoustic separation between apartments. In areas over the Thames Water tunnel the loads should be minimised as far as possible for reasons explained in Section 0. Lightweight partitions (1.0 kN/m² on plan) would be suitable to minimise load increase on the foundations in these areas.
Proposed imposed loads
The imposed loads used in the design have been taken from BS 6399-1.
Residential areas 1.5 kN/m² (Category A)
Retail areas 4.0 kN/m² (Category D)
Gym areas 5.0 kN/m² (Category C4)
Car park 2.5 kN/m² (Category F)
Basement plant 7.5 kN/m² (Category E)
Roof plant 2.5kN/m²
Figure 34: Summary of proposed loading assumed for typical floors
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Proposed cladding loads
The existing historic two-storey façade will be removed and rebuilt to five storeys to match the existing five storey façade. This façade will be loadbearing.
In the atrium and on the perimeter of Fifth and Sixth floors, the façade is supported on the new structural slabs. At this stage, the atrium façade is conservatively assumed to consist of a 250mm thick terracotta façade, of which 225mm is reinforced concrete and 25mm is terracotta brick. The glazing proportion has been taken as 35%. This results in a load of 4.2kN/m².
Snow loads
Snow loading will be calculated in accordance with the rules set out in BS 6399 Part 3.
The basic snow load on the flat roof will be taken as 0.4 kN/m². The roof is loaded by lightweight plant so snow loading will be assumed to occur simultaneously with the normal plant live load allowance.
5.8.7 Vehicular loading
Columns at ground floor and within the basement have not been designed for vehicle-impact loads. Any columns which are in danger of being struck by a vehicle because they are adjacent to a road or loading bay should be protected by means of suitable barriers.
5.8.8 Lateral loading
Wind loading will be calculated in accordance with BS 6399-2.
Notional horizontal loading
Notional horizontal loading will be considered in accordance with BS8110-1. The building should be capable of safely resisting the notional horizontal design ultimate load applied at each floor or roof level simultaneously. This is equal to 1.5% of the characteristic dead weight of the structure between mid-height of the storey below and either mid-height of the storey above or the roof surface.
The greater effect of notional horizontal loading or wind loading will be used in the design. The effects are not taken to act simultaneously.
5.8.9 Basement grade
The basement grades, in accordance with BS8102: Code of Practice for protection of below ground structures against water from the ground, are:
Table 3: Basement grades required
The existing basement to the north-east of the site will remain largely intact, with penetrations
for formation of new piles and caps only. The existing basement is above the groundwater
table and we are not aware of any reports of water ingress through the retaining walls or
groundbearing slab. This will be investigated further by survey and following soft strip.
For basement areas at Level B1 classed as Grade 2, the new pile caps will be carefully
detailed to be integral with the existing construction and no additional waterproofing
measures should be necessary. For areas required to meet Grade 3 – Habitable, additional
measures will be necessary. These could include cavity wall and floor finishes in
combination with an active room ventilation system.
New basement levels B2 to B4 are below the existing groundwater level and as such will
required full drained cavity wall and floor systems, connected to a system of sump pumps.
See Section 0 for further details.
Basement Use Grade Description Performance requirement
Plant rooms 2 Better utility No water seepage but some damp patches acceptable
Electrical rooms, store rooms and workshops
3 Habitable No damp patches. Vapour ingress acceptable
Gym 3 Habitable No damp patches. Vapour ingress acceptable
Car park 2 Better utility No water seepage but some damp patches acceptable
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5.9 Movements and Tolerances
A detailed Movement and Tolerances Report will be produced during detailed design. This will contain the information for other members of the design team and future contractors/ specialist subcontractors to undertake design work interfacing with the structure.
5.9.1 Structural movement
Structural elements will move vertically and laterally under applied loads. Movements are defined here as those which may occur in a structural element following its construction.
Structural movements are calculated on the basis of certain assumptions about material properties, loads and structural behaviour. Actual material properties and loads will differ when compared to the assumed values used in calculation. Factors such as the increase in overall stiffness provided by the cladding and stiffness in connections will also alter the actual structural behaviour. Real building structures are influenced by the performance of elements not necessarily considered in the modelling of the structural frame, such as the cladding.
5.9.2 Movement limits
The structure will be designed with the following movement limits. Generally, these are in accordance with, or more onerous than the current British Standard.
Sway movements
As part of the serviceability checks, the overall building drift will be limited to:
δDL + LL + WL (lateral deflection due to all loads) ≤ Height / 500
As there is brittle terracotta cladding around the building perimeter and atrium, the sway of one storey relative to a storey below:
δWL (deflections due to lateral loads) ≤ Storey height / 500
Vertical movements
In accordance with BS8110-1:1997 the vertical deflections should be limited to:
δLL (deflections due to imposed loads) ≤ Span / 500 and ≤ 20mm
δDL + LL (deflections due to total loads) ≤ Span / 250
In addition to the above, deflection of reinforced edge beams supporting the façade, under all superimposed dead and live loads imposed after façade installation, shall be limited to:
δSDL + LL (total deflections post-façade installation) ≤ 15mm
The structure and cladding shall be designed to cater for these imposed movements without visible distress.
5.9.3 Tolerances
Tolerances are allowances made in the design detailing to cater for the anticipated accuracy of construction including fabrication and erection. Typically, tolerances relate to the theoretical position of an unloaded structural element at the time of its construction.
Tolerances within the fabrication and erection of the steelwork frame should be such that they do not hinder the erection or induce excessive stresses, deflections or distortions into the structure.
The constructional accuracy shall comply with the more onerous of the following:
1. Concrete National Structural Concrete Specification (NSCS), Current Edition
2. Steelwork National Structural Steelwork Specification (NSSS) Current Edition
3. Plan position ± 15mm (column or beam)
4. Level Accuracy ± 15mm, but including the following limits of flatness:
All concrete floors shall comply with the following flatness requirements:
a) ± 5mm under a 3m straight edge.
b) ± 2mm under a 1m straight edge.
Special tolerances
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5.10 Materials
5.10.1 Existing structure
No information has been made available of the concrete grade used for the existing structural elements that will be reused (i.e. piles, pile caps, retaining wall). These will be confirmed at the next design stage through insitu testing.
For the existing load rundown comparison the density of reinforced concrete has been assumed to be 24kN/m²
5.10.2 New structure
Excluded materials
Only materials in accordance with ‘Good Practice in the Selection of Construction Materials’ by Arup will be specified in the structural works.
Materials standards
All materials to be incorporated into the works shall be manufactured to the relevant British or European Standard and obtained from a recognized source, carrying the relevant certification of quality control. Suitable records of material quality shall be kept by the Contractor and issued to the client before handover.
All concrete shall be obtained from suppliers carrying a Certificate of Accreditation under the Quality Scheme for Ready-mixed Concrete.
The following minimum standards shall be adopted:
Material Grade/Type Comments
Steel external S275JO / S355JO – Rolled Open Sections
S275J2H / S355J2H – Hollow Sections
BS EN 10025 : 2004
BS EN 10210 : 2006
Concrete general Grade C35/40
BS 8500: Part 1: 2002
Concrete for metal deck slabs Grade C28/35 normal weight concrete BS 8500: Part 1: 2002
Concrete Reinforcement Deformed high yield bars (500MPa) BS 4449: 2005
Within the design the following properties shall be assumed for materials:
Materials Specific Weightϒ
Poisson ratio v
Kg/m3 kN/mm2 kN/mm2
Concrete typically 2400 14 long term / 28 short term
- 0.15 12x10-6 /°C
5.10.3 Durability
All new elements of the building structure will be designed to be adequately durable under the relevant conditions, to achieve the specified design life.
For concrete elements, this will be achieved by specification of suitable mix and provision of sufficient cover, in accordance with the relevant standard.
5.10.4 Corrosion protection
Steelwork will be present in the building in the atrium façade and the roof structure. As the atrium façade is external it will require an external corrosion protection specification. This will be paint applied in the form of a suitable primer, barrier and topcoat. Consideration should be given to access for maintenance at the end of paint life, typically 25 years.
5.10.5 Fire protection
Structure generally 90 mins
Roof structure Not required
Reinforced concrete elements will have an appropriate level of cover specified.
Applied fire protection to steelwork could be intumescent coating, fire spray or board, and will be specified by the Architect.
Structural elements supporting roofs are not required to be fire resistant unless the supported roof is to be used as a means of escape.
5.10.6 Concrete finishes
Concrete floor slabs will generally have a standard floated finish.
Special concrete finishes
Refer to the Architect’s specification for any special finish requirements to visually exposed concrete.
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5.11.1 Statutory regulations
The design of the building structure shall comply with the following regulations and bye- laws:
Building Regulations 2000 and the Building Act 1984
Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007
5.11.2 Codes of Practice
The design of the building structure will be carried out to the relevant British and European Standards, Codes of Practice and Building Regulations, and their various amendments. These include:
Loading
BS 648: 1964 Schedule of weights of building materials
BS 6399-1: 1996 Loadings for Buildings: Part 1: Code of Practice for dead and imposed loads
BS 6399-2: 1997 Loadings for Buildings: Part 2: Code of Practice for wind loads
BS 6399-3: 1988 Loadings for Buildings: Part 3: Code of Practice for imposed roof loads
Foundations
BS 8002: 1994 Code of Practice for earth retaining structures
BS 8102: 2009 Code of Practice for protection of below ground structures against water from the ground
Concrete
BS 8110-1: 1997 Structural use of concrete: Part 1: Code of Practice for design and construction
BS 8500-1: 2002 Concrete- Complimentary British Standard to BS EN 206-1: Part 1: Method for specifying and guidance for the specifier
BS 8500-2: 2002 Concrete- Complimentary British Standard to BS EN 206-1: Part 2: Specification for constituent materials and concrete
BS EN 206-1: 2000 Part 1: Specification, performance, production and conformity
BS 4449: 2005 Steel for reinforcement of concrete: Weldable reinforcing steel – bar, coil and de-coiled product - specification
Steelwork
BS 5950-1: 2000 Structural use of steelwork in buildings: Part 1: Code of Practice for the design – rolled and welded sections
BS 5950-3: 1997 Structural use of steelwork in buildings: Part 3: Design in composite construction
BS 5493: 1977 Code of Practice for protective coating on iron and steel structures against corrosion
Masonry
BS 5628-1: 2005 Code of practice for the use of masonry: Part 1: Structural use of unreinforced masonry
BS 5628-2: 2005 Code of practice for the use of masonry: Part 2: Structural use of reinforced and prestressed masonry
Specifications
5.11.3 Design guidance
Supplementary reference documents will be used during the design of the building, in addition to the above Standards and Codes of Practice. These include:
Design Guide on the Vibration of Floors SCI publication 076: The Steel Construction Institute: 1989
Reinforcement Detailing Manual Ove Arup Partnership: 2008
Structural guidance note 1.2: Good Practice Guide – Calculations Ove Arup Partnership: 2000
Appraisal of existing structures (Third edition) IStructE publication: 2010
Refurbishment of concrete buildings: structural and services options BSRIA Guidance Note 8/99:1999
Historical approaches to the design of concrete buildings and structures Concrete Society Technical Report No. 70: 2009
CIRIA Design of reinforced concrete flat slabs to BS 8110: 1994
CIRIA Design of shear wall buildings: 1984
CIRIA The design of deep beams in reinforced concrete: 1977
229690 For Information
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5
Job Title
Job No
RC downstandRC upstand
Storey height wall Column supported on existing tunnel pile cap
S-GA-B4
Face of RC lining wall
Inside face of drained cavity wall
7650 typ.
3825 typ.
6250 3950
7630 3950
www.arup.com
s e r s \ g l e n . s w
i n n e y \ D
e s k t o p \ U
n t i t l e d . d w
g 1 9 N
o v 2 0 1 3 1 1 : 2 1 : 4 4 i d : 8 F
C 6 9 B
- 4 0 D
7 - 8 B
8 1 2 G
A3 A
2
3
4
5
Job Title
Job No
RC downstandRC upstand
Storey height wall Column supported on existing tunnel pile cap
S-GA-B3 18/12/13 JB NW NW
Stage C
P1 P1
Centre of secant pile wall See ARUP-S-SK-018
Inside face of drained cavity wall
300mm Pool slab
700x450dp Waling beam
CAR STACKER VOID
650x650 Columns typ. 300thk walls
around sprinkler tank
www.arup.com
s e r s \ g l e n . s w
i n n e y \ D
e s k t o p \ U
n t i t l e d . d w
g 1 9 N
o v 2 0 1 3 1 1 : 2 1 : 4 4 i d : 8 F
C 6 9 B
- 4 0 D
7 - 8 B
8 1 2 G
A3 A
2
3
4
5
Job Title
Job No
RC downstandRC upstand
Storey height wall Column supported on existing tunnel pile cap
S-GA-B2 18/12/13 JB NW NW
Stage C
P1 P1
Face of RC lining wall
Inside face of drained cavity wall
CAR STACKER VOID
700x450dp Waling beam 550x2250 Buttress wall within car stacker void
300thk Walls around sprinkler tank
650x650 Columns typ.
www.arup.com
s e r s \ g l e n . s w
i n n e y \ D
e s k t o p \ U
n t i t l e d . d w
g 1 9 N
o v 2 0 1 3 1 1 : 2 1 : 4 4 i d : 8 F
C 6 9 B
- 4 0 D
7 - 8 B
8 1 2 G
A3 A
2
3
4
5
Job Title
Job No
RC downstandRC upstand
Storey height wall Column supported on existing tunnel pile cap
S-GA-B1 18/12/13 JB NW NW
Stage C
P2 P1
450thk RC Stability wall
400x1400 RC piers typ. to support facade
550x550 typ. internal column
450thk RC Stability wall
450thk RC Stability wall
7650 typ.
3825 typ.
26/02/16 NW NWNWP2
229690 For Information
60 Sloane Avenue
60 SA Limited
13 Fitzroy Street
London W1T 4BQ
www.arup.com
s e r s \ g l e n . s w
i n n e y \ D
e s k t o p \ U
n t i t l e d . d w
g 1 9 N
o v 2 0 1 3 1 1 : 2 1 : 4 4 i d : 8 F
C 6 9 B
- 4 0 D
7 - 8 B
8 1 2 G
A3 A
2
3
4
5
Job Title
Job No
Column supported on existing tunnel pile cap
Two-way 250mm slab on beams on column grid- to allow for stair and services penetrations
Key
RC downstandRC upstand
Stage C
P2 P1
300thk RC Stability wall
550x550 typ. internal column
350x350 typ. edge column
7650 typ.
3825 typ.
www.arup.com
s e r s \ g l e n . s w
i n n e y \ D
e s k t o p \ U
n t i t l e d . d w
g 1 9 N
o v 2 0 1 3 1 1 : 2 1 : 4 4 i d : 8 F
C 6 9 B
- 4 0 D
7 - 8 B
8 1 2 G
A3 A
2
3
4
5
Job Title
Job No
RC downstandRC upstand
Storey height wall Column supported on existing tunnel pile cap
S-GA-01 18/12/13 JB NW NW
Stage C
P2 P1
300thk RC Stability wall typ
300thk RC Stability wall typ.
300thk RC Stability wall typ.
2255 4600
Slab edge
475x475 typ. internal column
300x300 typ. edge column
7650 typ.
3825 typ.