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8th Product Carbon Footprint World Summit, 26-27 September 2012, Berlin Renewable Resources in the Value Chain: A Viable Option for Reducing Environmental Footprints?

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▶ Carbon and environmental footprinting: How are standards,initiatives and their implementation progressing? ▶ What does carbon footprint reality look like? Is carbonfootprinting driving real change or just binding valuableresources? ▶ Is renewable resource use (e.g. bioplastics) in productsa viableoption for reducing carbon and environmentalfootprints? ▶ How is their use reflected in carbon and environmentalfootprintstandards? ▶ How are initiatives working to ensure an ecologicallybalanceduse of renewable resources? The 8th PCF World Summit will feature updates, businessviewpoints and dialogue around these and related questions.

TRANSCRIPT

Page 1: 8th PCF World Summit Programme

8th Product Carbon Footprint World Summit, 26-27 September 2012, Berlin

Renewable Resources in the Value Chain:A Viable Option for Reducing Environmental Footprints?

Page 2: 8th PCF World Summit Programme

2 www.pcf-world-forum.org

About the PCF World Forum

Consumption of goods and services contributes to a large share of worldwide GHG emissions and other environmental challenges. Solutions are needed to help companies manage and communicate the climate and environmental impact of their products. They are also needed to provide consumers with the necessary information to make climate-conscious consumption decisions.

To navigate these challenges and provide orientation in the often complex world of carbon and environmental footprinting the Product Carbon Footprint (PCF) World Forum was established. It is a neutral platform for ­companies­and­other­stakeholders­to­share­and­reflect­on challenges, practical experiences, initiatives, tools and insights towards climate-conscious consumption and production.

The PCF World Forum was created out of the ambition to talk with each other and not just about each other. There are an increasing number of initiatives in the world, but the real understanding of respective approaches and activities is often limited. Over the past years, representatives from a range of organisations and initiatives have come together at the PCF World Summits, PCF World Forum Update Workshops and dedicated Dialogue Forums Low Carbon Society to give insights into their own work, discuss and interpret current developments and explore possible common pathways.

The PCF World Summits have stimulated several working groups such as the Task Force on international harmoni sation of Product Category Rules (PCR) and direct collaboration between participants.

www.pcf-world-forum.org

Speakers at the 7th PCF World Summit. From left to right: Bettina von Streit, Bayer, Germany | Annemarie Kerkhof, PRé Consultants, Netherlands | Mary Sotos, GHG Protocol Initiative/ WRI, USA | Jean-Christophe Bligny, Danone, France | Rana Pant, Joint Research Centre/ EU Commission, Italy | Kevin Ramm, SAP, UK | Nancy Gillis, General Services Administration, USA | Michael Ooms, Intertek, Belgium | Euan­Murray,­The­Sustainability­Consortium,­USA­|­Sophie­Hennes,­Alstom­Power,­Switzerland­|­Henry­Garthwaite,­Carbon­Trust­­Certification­Limited, UK | Karen Fisher, Environmental Resources Management, UK | Sophie Fallaha, CIRAIG, Canada | Michael Spielmann, PE Inter-national, Germany | Rasmus Priess, PCF World Forum/ THEMA1, Germany | Jacob Bilabel, THEMA1, Germany | Thierry Berthoud, WBCSD, Switzerland | Sven-Olof Ryding, SEMCo, Sweden | Martin Bortzmeyer, French Ministry of Sustainable Development, France | Asami Miyake, JEMAI, Japan. Further speakers: Andrea Brown Smatlan, WBCSD, Switzerland | Stephan Singer, WWF International, Belgium | Sarah Maier, Deutsche Bahn, Germany | Felicia Müller-Pelzer, SolarWorld, Germany | Henrik Kuffner, WindMade, Belgium

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▶ Carbon and environmental footprinting: How are stan-dards, initiatives and their implementation progressing?

▶ What does carbon footprint reality look like? Is carbon footprinting driving real change or just binding valuable resources?

▶ Is renewable resource use (e.g. bioplastics) in products a viable option for reducing carbon and environmental footprints?

▶ How is their use reflected in carbon and environmental footprint standards?

▶ How are initiatives working to ensure an ecologically balanced use of renewable resources?

The 8th PCF World Summit will feature updates, business viewpoints and dialogue around these and related questions.

The stage is set by updates on international and selected national carbon and environmental footprints standards and initiatives, such as ISO 14067 “Carbon Footprint of Products”, the French Environmental Product Declarati-on Scheme and the Product Carbon Footprint Project in Québec.

In a special session “Reflections on EU environmental footprinting methodology and policy” an update on current status in methodology and policy developments is given and discussed.

In dedicated parallel tracks specific­topics­are­discussed­based on input presentations by participants:

▶ Evidence and insights on renewable resource use in products based on carbon and environmental footprinting business case studies will be presented and discussed

▶ Alternative/complementary approaches to assessing sustainability in value chains, particularly the use of extended Input-Output Models (E-IO) and economic valuation techniques

▶ Also a carbon footprint track for participants who are new to carbon footprinting (carbon footprinting for "beginners") will be offered: Basic introduction to

methods, initiatives, topics of discussion and frequently asked questions.

Stakeholder viewpoints, initiatives and certification schemes on renewable resource use in products will provide an understanding of current developments and critical issues in renewable resource use.

More­than­five­years­into­the­development­of­carbon­ footprinting methodologies and tools, the current situation of carbon footprinting is assessed:

▶ Business viewpoints on carbon footprint reality will provide an understanding of how carbon footprinting implementation is taking place in reality and what role it actually plays

▶ In a plenary discussion we are asking the questions: "Quo vadis carbon footprinting – Too much talking

or real change?"

The Summit programme provides networking opportu-nities, including the Low Carbon Network Dinner in the evening of Day 1 (premium registration required).

Introduction | 8th PCF World Summit | 26-27 September 2012 | Berlin

Renewable Resources in the Value Chain: A Viable Option for Reducing Environmental Footprints?

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Day 1, Wednesday, 26 September 2012 Day 2, Thursday, 27 September 2012Time

The two-day 8th PCF World Summit with focus on "Renew able Resources in the Value Chain: A Viable Option for Reducing Environmental Footprints?" will take place from 26-27 September 9h00 to 18h00 at the Quadriga Forum, Berlin:Quadriga Forum, Werderscher Markt 15, 10117 Berlin, Germany

To register, please use the fax form attached to this document or use the online registration on the PCF World Forum ticket page: www.pcf-world-forum.org/tickets

Programme subject to change.

Programme Overview | 8th PCF World Summit | 26-27 September 2012 | Berlin

Renewable Resources in the Value Chain: A Viable Option for Reducing Environmental Footprints?

Check- in and welcome coffee

Opening and reporting back from dedicated tracks

Viewpoints,­initiatives­and­certification­schemes­on renewable resource use

Closing

Conversation lunch

Business viewpoints on carbon footprint reality and plenary discussion

'Carbon footprinting – too much talking or real change?

Networking time

Check- in and welcome coffee

Opening and introduction

Carbon and environmental footprinting standards and initiatives

Conversation lunch

Closing

Dedicated tracks

Evidence and insights on

renewable resource use in products

Alternative approaches to

assessing sustainability

in value chains

Carbon footprinting

for beginners/ FAQs

Low Carbon Network Dinner(premium registration required)

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Coffee breakCoffee break

Reflections­on­EU­Environmental­Footprinting­ Methodology and Policy

Further Updates on international developments

Individual email / Networking time

Viewpoints,­initiatives­and­certification­schemes­on renewable resource use

Individual email / Networking time

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Programme Details | 8th PCF World Summit | 26-27 September 2012 | Berlin

Renewable Resources in the Value Chain: A Viable Option for Reducing Environmental Footprints?

Chair of the 8th PCF World Summit

Guido AxmannTHEMA1, Germany

About Guido Axmann

Guido Axmann is co-founder and managing director of THEMA1, a Berlin-based think-do-tank specialised in accelerat-

ing social change. Founded in 2006, THEMA1 initiates and operates projects in the fields of sustainable consumption,

renewable energy, a green music and entertainment industry, and mass mobilisation of the public towards a low-car-

bon future. Current projects: PCF World Forum, Renewable Supply Chain Project, Green Music Initiative, Grid Master

Class and Renewables-Grid-Initiative.

Day 1, Wednesday, 26 September 2012

08:00 Check-in and welcome coffee

09:00 Opening and introduction

▶ Introduction to the agenda and overview of international and national carbon/environmental footprint standards and initiatives

Rasmus PriessPCF World Forum / THEMA1, Germany

Rasmus Priess will introduce the PCF World Forum and provide an overview of the summit agenda and presentations

and place them in the larger context of international developments in carbon and environmental footprinting.

About Rasmus Priess

Rasmus Priess is expert and facilitator at THEMA1 on climate change, carbon footprinting and supply chain manage-

ment. He manages the Product Carbon Footprint Project/Platform for Climate Compatible Consumption Germany and

the PCF World Forum. He has served on the Steering Committee of the WRI/WBCSD GHG Protocol Product and

Supply Chain Initiative and the German mirror committee for ISO 14067 “Carbon Footprint of Products”. Previously

Rasmus worked as an independent consultant and facilitator on energy, climate change, and business development,

particularly in emerging economy contexts.

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09:30 Carbon and environmental footprinting standards and initiatives

▶ The long road to ISO 14067 "Carbon Footprint of Products" and implications for renewable resources

Matthias FinkbeinerISO-Committee TC207/SC5 for Life Cycle Assessment and International Life Cycle Board (ILCB) of the

UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative, Germany

The current status of ISO 14067 "Carbon Footprint of Products" is presented including background on the concerns

from several developing countries which led to further delays in the standardization process. Focus will be placed on

implications with regard to renewable resources, because there are several methodological challenges when it comes

to a proper and consistent treatment of this issue. Examples are the treatment of biogenic carbon flows and associ-

ated credits, the treatment of recycled biogenic materials and the discussion on direct and indirect land use change.

About Matthias Finkbeiner

Prof. Dr. Matthias Finkbeiner is currently Chair of Sustainable Engineering and Vice-Director of the Department of En-

vironmental Technology at Technical University Berlin. He is also Chairman of the ISO-Committee TC207/SC5 for Life

Cycle Assessment and member of the International Life Cycle Board (ILCB) of the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative.

He served on the Steering Committee of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Product/Supply Chain Initiative of the WBCSD/

WRI. Earlier in his career, he was Manager for Life Cycle Engineering at the Design-for-Environment Department for

Mercedes-Benz Cars at Daimler AG in Stuttgart and Vice-Director Environmental Management at PE International.

▶ Quebec’s Product Carbon Footprint Pilot Project: Reproducibility, comparability and auditability of product carbon footprints

Peter EdwardsMinistry for Economic Development, Innovation and Export Trade, Québec

Despite recent developments regarding methodological harmonisation, challenges remain to provide enough speci-

ficity to enable consistent comparability of product carbon footprint calculations through the development of product

category rules (PCRs). Moreover, source data auditing of scope 3 greenhouse assertions is a relatively new discipline

and lacks specific guidance. To address these and other challenges, the government of Québec is conducting a pilot

project as the first step in the implementation of a $24M voluntary product carbon footprint labelling initiative. The pilot

will test different protocols and category rules to assess result reproducibility and variability. The effect on results of the

importance of hydroelectricity in Québec’s energy mix, source data auditing mechanisms for scope 3 emissions and

international harmonization efforts in PCF are elements of particular interest. In an effort to lay solid foundations to the

initiative, Québec has partnered with the Interuniversity Research Centre for the Life Cycle of Products, Processes

and Services (CIRAIG) and will benefit from the greenhouse gas verification expertise of the Bureau de normalisation

du Québec (BNQ).

About Peter Edwards

Peter Edwards is an industrial development advisor at the Québec Ministry for Economic development, Innovation and

Export trade where he is mainly responsible of the Québec product carbon footprint pilot project. He received a degree

in finance from Laval University after which he spent five years working for a large Canadian financial institution. Peter

is currently completing an MBA in corporate social responsibility with a focus on issues relating to climate change.

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▶ After the one year-long National Experiment: Toward the French Product Environmental Footprint Scheme

Antonin VergezMinistry of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy, France

Antonin Vergez will present 1) a synthesis of the one year-long national voluntary experiment of the display of product

environmental footprints, 2) the components that are currently gathered to assess it (surveys and free feedbacks from

participating companies, consumers and environmental NGOs reports, etc.) and guide the report that will be sent to

the French parliament in december 2012.

About Antonin Vergez

Antonin Vergez is policy officer on sustainable food production and consumption. His work lies in economic and

environmental analysis as well as in studies on agri-environment. Moreover, he has done work on the global impacts

of agricultural production for food and non food (biofuels) and on environmental labelling for food products. Antonin

Vergez studied at AgroParisTech, agronomy and natural resources economics, applied for a PhD in development eco-

nomics, did some field work in developing countries (Mexico and South Africa), and is currently working for the French

Ministry of Ecology and Sustainable Development, with emphasis on the French product environmental

footprint declaration scheme.

11:00 Coffee break

11:30 Reflections on EU environmental footprinting methodology and policy

▶ EU environmental footprinting strategy: Next steps in methodology and policy development

Pavel Misiga Michele GalatolaDG Environment/ DG Environment/

European Commission, European Commission,

Belgium Belgium

In its conclusions on the Sustainable Consumption and Production Action Plan, the Council invited the Commission “to

take into account Member States’ experience, to start working as soon as possible on common voluntary methodologies

facilitating the future establishment of carbon audits for organisations and the calculation of the carbon footprint of products

and organisations”. The European Commission concluded that it is important to take into consideration all environmental

impacts of products and organisations in a balanced way.

After further demands for harmonised methodologies through the “Single Market Act”, the European Council Conclusions

on “Sustainable materials management and sustainable production and consumption” and the Resource Efficiency Road-

map, DG Environment is now working together with the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC IES) and

other European Commission services towards the development of

- a harmonised methodology for the calculation of the environmental footprint of products

- and a technical guide for the calculation of the environmental footprint of organisations.

Pavel Misiga will explain status and considerations of methodology and future policy development.

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About Pavel Misiga

A graduate of Comenius University, London School of Economics and Princeton University, Pavel Misiga worked as

an environmental consultant and a government official in his home country Slovakia. He served as a director at the

Ministry of Environment and advisor to the State Secretary for Environment. During Slovakia's EU accession negotia-

tions he represented his country in the negotiations on environmental issues. He joined the European Commission in

2003. In the period 2003-2006 he was responsible for the implementation of environmental projects financed by the

Cohesion Fund. Since 2006 he has been the head of the Environment and Industry and later the Sustainable

Production and Consumption unit. He is currently responsible for the development of Resource Efficiency and

Sustainable Consumption and Production policies.

About Michele Galatola

Dr Michele Galatola has a degree and post-doc in Environmental Sciences with about 13 years working experience

in the area of waste and wastewater treatments, cleaner production, certification systems and, mainly, Life Cycle

Thinking and Life Cycle Assessment. After having worked for several years in the Italian National Research Center

for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment he has joined in 2005 the European Commission. From 2005 till

2010 he has been working in the Directorate General for Research, being responsible for programming, launching and

following a number of relevant research initiatives related to cleaner technologies (mainly waste) and methodologi-

cal developments in the area of Life Cycle Assessment. Since July 2010 he has moved to the Directorate General

or Environment, becoming Leader of the Product Team. He and his team are responsible for the implementation of

some product-related policy tools (Ecolabel, Green Public Procurement) and are also leading the development of the

upcoming harmonised Environmental Footprint methodologies.

▶ Reactions and questions from PCF World Summit participants on EU environmental footprinting developments

Due to the high interest in the EU environmental footprinting efforts, more time will be allocated to the discussion

following Pavel Misiga's presentation. Participants have thus the opportunity to provide their perspective on current

developments and strengthen joint reflection.

12:30 Conversation lunch

14:00 Individual email / Networking time

14:30 Dedicated parallel tracks

Short introduction to all tracks and presentations in main plenary

Track 1: Evidence and insights on renewable resource use in products

▶ The carbon footprint of chemical resins manufactured in Colombia: Is natural or synthetic source material better?

Juan Carlos LealColumbian Gaia Environmental Services, Grupo Mundial, Colombia

In his presentation Mr. Juan Leal will provide insights from a study on substituting polyester resins with natural resins

for different applications. He will explain some relevance of cultivation practice and land use change, the role of the

Colombian energy mix, the used standard and Product Category Rule. Furthermore, he will explain the overall product

performance, e.g. the qualitative comparison of both resins with regard to endurance, (bio-) degradability and

recyclability.

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About Juan Carlos Leal

Environmental Engineer, Magister's candidate in Environmental Conservation, with over 10 years experience in the environ-

mental area. Director of the Environmental Division of the consulting firm Gaia Environmental Services based in Medellin

Colombia. Certified as Carbon Footprint Expert by Carbon Trust and trained by the Water Footprint Network in implementing

the Water Footprint methodology.With extensive experience in corporate and product carbon footprint studies.

▶ Carbon footprint of direct and indirect land-use change: A review of knowledge, relevance and practice

Uwe FritscheInternational Institute for Sustainability Analysis and Strategy, Germany

Land-use change is seen as a major contributor to worldwide GHG emissions and product carbon footprints. However,

it is not fully and routinely integrated in commonly used GHG accounting frameworks. Lack of scientific understanding

and clear models is often given as a reason. In his presentation, Uwe Fritsche provides a review of current knowledge

on GHG emissions from land-use change, their relevance for GHG accounting and considerations on their current and

future integration in common GHG accounting frameworks.

About Uwe Fritsche

Uwe studied applied physics at the Technical University Darmstadt, and worked since 1984 as a scientist at Oeko-

Institut where he headed the Energy & Climate Division in Darmstadt until 2010. After that, he focused on international

activities and projects concerning sustainable biomass. In 2012, he co-founded IINAS and works there as Scientific

Director. His expertise is material-flow and life-cycle analysis of energy, materials and transport systems, and in de-

veloping sustainability scenarios with respective models and databases. He is National Team Leader of IEA Bioen-

ergy Task 40, contributes to the Global Bioenergy Partnership, and leads the GBEP workstream on indirect land use

changes (ILUC). Besides his scientific work, he is a Reiki master, practices QiGong and likes Nordic Skating, as well

as riding trains.

▶ Use of renewable raw materials in the chemical industry

Henk BoschMaterial science and life science company DSM, The Netherlands

DSM has a very good track record in the production of chemicals based on fossil fuels, of yeasts, enzymes and antibi-

otics from sugars by biotechnology and places a focus on “Eco+ products” with the lowest footprint over the life cycle.

With this background it seems logical that the company seriously engages in the development of new ways to produce

chemicals and plastics from renewable raw materials to achieve lower carbon footprints compared to fossil based

alternatives. This led to the market introduction of one biobased chemical (succinic acid) and two biobased plastics

(a polyamide and a polyester) already.

The lower carbon footprint is based on the fact that the carbon in the material is short cycle and therefore the release

of stored carbon does not affect global warming. As this is not the full picture, we need a life cycle assessment to

clarify whether the overall footprint actually is lower. There are real issues to be solved, particularly with regard to

energy intensities, waste volumes, land-use change, economies of scale, access to suitable raw materials and “new”

environmental issues such as biodiversity and water scarcity. In a few examples the implications will be shown, and

how DSM is dealing with these in order to create brighter lives for people today and for generations to come.

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About Henk Bosch

Henk Bosch is Competence Leader Life Cycle Assessment at DSM. He is responsible for the availability of trained LCA

engineers, LCA software and databases, for developing best practices in the field, and for the quality of LCAs carried

out by DSM employees or consultants.

▶ Communicating environmental indicators of food products in the French National Experiment

Olivier JanBio Intelligence Service, France

The French National experiment has produced a range of different consumer communication approaches, which are

currently evaluated. Olivier Jan will introduce different communication approaches for food products that have been

used by companies.

About Olivier Jan

Olivier Jan is an engineer graduated from the Ecole Centrale de Paris and holds a Master of Science from the Imperial

College in Environmental Management. He started his career with the company Ecobilan in 1992, a life cycle assess-

ment specialist. In 1999 he joined MASAI Consulting, a leading European supply chain specialist, where he became a

partner. He is now managing and developing BIO Intelligence Service's activities in the field of environmental manage-

ment in France.

Track 2: Alternative approaches to assessing sustainability in value chains

▶ WRAP Product Sustainability Forum: Identifying priority product categories for collaborative environmental improvements

Mark BarthelWRAP, UK

Mark Barthel from WRAP (the Waste & Resources Action Programme) in the UK will introduce the work of Product

Sustainability Forum and explain the forum’s approach to identifying the environmental impact hotspots associated with

grocery and home improvement products and the range of impact reduction opportunities associated with them. The

Product Sustainability Forum (PSF) is a collaboration of 80+ organisations made up of grocery and home improvement

retailers, major brand-owners and their suppliers, academics, NGOs and UK Government representatives. With many

companies have already started measuring the environmental performance of products, the PSF was established to

act as an enabling hub in the UK on product sustainability. It’s aim is to undertake research and facilitate and prioritise

collective action to improve the environmental performance of products. Since its creation in late 2011, the PSF has

also been working alongside other similar national and international initiatives to share data, knowledge and insight,

harmonise approaches and undertake a range of collaborative projects. More information on the forum can be found at:

www.wrap.org.uk/psf or by contacting Amanda Gadd at: [email protected]

About Mark Barthel

Mark’s current role as Special Adviser and Head of Design at WRAP (the Waste & Resources Action Programme) puts

him at the centre of WRAP’s efforts to move the UK economy from a linear (extract-make-throw-away resources) to a

circular economy. In this role Mark provides strategic support and advice to the sustainability / corporate responsibil-

ity, construction, product design, technical and supply chain teams at Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury’s, M&S, Wm Morrison’s,

Nestlé and others. Mark is also an adviser to the World Economic Forum’s Driving Sustainable Consumption Initiative,

the UNEP’s Sustainable Food System Programme and the recently formed UK Product Sustainability Forum. Mark

is a non-executive director at the Forest Stewardship Council, a Fellow at the University of Southampton Centre for

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Environmental Science, and a member of the Advisory Board for Sustainable Innovation 2012. He is also a former

part-time Special Advisor to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and led the development of the first

international (ISO) standards on environmental management and greenhouse gas quantification and verification.

Mark is currently involved in national and international standards work on product water foot-printing and LCA.

When not working Mark enjoys languishing in the green splendour of his family’s eco-home in Berkshire in the UK!

▶ Quantification of corporate supply chain impacts based on extended input-output-models for sustainability management

Moritz NillSystain, Germany

Moritz Nill will discuss pros and cons of different approaches to measure environmental impacts in the supply chain and

explain how to use extended input-output models in practice. Based on practical examples Moritz Nill will explain major

sustainability risks and challenges in the supply chain for companies.

About Moritz Nill

Dr. Moritz Nill is Director of Systain’s office in Berlin and is leading the natural resource and waste handling team. As

a trained physicist Mr Nill has received his doctorate degree on the ecological impacts of energy techniques. During

his PhD he has concentrated on Life Cycle Assessment and environmentally extended input-output-analysis and the

evaluation of environmental impacts. Mr Nill has got wide experiences in consulting of companies focussing on envi-

ronmental data management and sustainability strategy.

▶ Valuing natural capital: Techniques & applications for common consumer products

Steve BullockTruCost, UK

Natural resource economist Trucost will present an approach to assessing the environmental impact of individual products in

monetary terms, a process which seeks to provide businesses with a robust framework within which to embed environmental

factors into strategic decision-making and with the ability to integrate that risk into financial planning. The session will include

several examples of such analyses, including food products and clothing, an explanation of the business case for work of this

nature and details of the key challenges faced in developing and applying the methodology.

About Steve Bullock

Steve manages the supply chain research team at Trucost and is responsible for the delivery of supply chain projects

to clients in the public and private sector. Since joining in November 2008, Steve has worked with clients including

Thomson Reuters, The Environment Agency, PUMA and the Formula One Teams Association. Before joining Trucost,

Steve worked for 2 years as a Data Analyst for a performance management consultancy firm. Steve has a BA in

Geography and a MSc in Sustainable Development from the University of Exeter.

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▶ Introducing the Higg Index: An indicator based tool for measuring the environmental and social performance of apparel and footwear products

Karin EkbergAdidas Group and Sustainable Apparel Coalition, Germany

The Sustainable Apparel Coalition is an industry-wide group of over 60 apparel and footwear brands, retailers, suppliers, non-

profits, and NGOs (including members such as adidas, CocaCola, Levi Strauss, Nike, Patagonia, Marks & Spencer, Walmart,

DuPont and Huntsmann) working to reduce the environmental and social impacts of apparel and footwear products around

the world. With the creation of an apparel and footwear index (Higg Index), the Sustainable Apparel Coalition aims to accom-

plish several goals: 1. Understand and quantify sustainability impacts of apparel and footwear products, 2. Dramatically re-

duce redundancy in measuring sustainability in the apparel and footwear industries, 3. Drive business value through reducing

risk and uncovering efficiency, 4. Create a common means to communicate sustainability to stakeholders. Karin Ekberg from

adidas will introduce the Sustainable Apparel Coalition and version 1.0 of the Higg Index.

About Karin Ekberg

Karin has a Master of Science in Chemical Engineering from Gothenburg and Zuerich technical universities. Later,

post-studies in environmental management at the University of Zuerich were conducted, including a project developing

an ethical-social-environmental rating system for companies. Karin has 25 years’ experience working in Switzerland,

Brazil, Sweden and Germany. Karin has worked as a project manager to build plants, consult and manage in all areas

of environment such as end-of-pipe treatment, risk assessments, M&A, ISO 14001, ISO 26000 in global management

positions at global consultancies and industries. In January 2009, Karin joined the Social & Environmental Affairs

Team of the adidas Group in Germany as Head of Environmental Services. Her key responsibilities and advisory func-

tion is focused on the development of Group environmental strategies and management systems including reporting

processes as well as environmental research and material science. Karin is Chair of the Board of Directors of the

Sustainable Apparel Coalition, SAC.

Track 3: Carbon footprinting for beginners/ FAQs

A carbon footprint track for participants who are new to carbon footprinting (carbon footprinting for “beginners” ) will be

offered with basic introduction to methods, initiatives, topics of discussion and frequently asked questions. The session

is designed to be flexible and adapted to the interests of participants.

Chair:

Jan Christian Polanía GiesePCF World Forum/ THEMA1, Germany

About Jan Christian Polanía Giese:

Jan Christian Polanía Giese has an academic background in environmental engineering. He conducted product and

corporate carbon footprint studies in different sectors and is a member of the GHG Protocol Technical Working Group.

He has been a tutor at the Technical University Berlin and recently graduated at the HPI School of Design Thinking

in Potsdam.

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17:00 Further updates on international developments

▶ Carbon footprint communication and consumer education in the Japanese 'CFP Communication Program'

Hanako Negishi PriestnallJEMAI, Japan

JEMAI has been managing the CFP program since April 2012, after completing a three-year pilot project. JEMAI also

manage EcoLeaf (Type III environmental declaration) and are currently entering the trial period in an attempt to fuse

these programs together. Our aim has always been to raise visibility from simply showing figures to communicating

results based on the life cycle thinking. This presentation will mainly provide the current situation of our label projects

and integration from CFP into EcoLeaf in the future.

About Hanako Negishi Priestnall

She has been part of JEMAI's LCA division since June 2010. Currently she is an EcoLeaf (ISO type III environmental

declarations) qualified verifier and operator. She's especially support PCR working groups and companies which don't

have a great deal of experience with LCA. She holds a Bachelor's degree in Biology and previously worked in the field

of environmental education.

17:30 Wrap-up Day 1

18:00 Closing Day 1

20:00 Network Dinner (premium registration required)

As a tradition at the PCF World Summits, the Network Dinner takes place on the evening of the first conference day.

It gives the participants a special opportunity to network in a relaxed atmosphere while experiencing exquisite cuisine.

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Day 2, Thursday 27 September 2012

08:00 Check-in and welcome coffee

09:00 Opening and reporting back from dedicated tracks

Outcomes and main discussion points of the dedicated tracks on Day 1 will be shared with participants in the

main plenary.

09:30 Viewpoints, initiatives and certification schemes on renewable resource use

▶ Climate criteria for agricultural commodities: An appraisal of approaches and challenges of common sustainability certification systems.

Martina FleckensteinWWF, Germany

Martina Fleckenstein from WWF Germany will introduce some of the most common sustainability certification systems for

agricultural commodities (RSPO, RTRS, Bonsucro, ISCC, RSB und BCI), examine approaches taken with regard to GHG

emissions and climate change and highlight obstacles that still need to be overcome.

About Martina Fleckenstein

She is Director of EU Policy, Agriculture & Sustainable Biomass of WWF Germany (World Wide Fund for Nature). Martina

has worked on certification and international commodity markets for several years. She has been involved in the develop-

ment of sustainable certification schemes with a focus on biodiversity and conservation. She is running projects on sus-

tainable land use management and spatial planning in Southeast Asia and Latin-America, esp. for the identification of high

and low risk areas for sustainable commodity production. She is a biologist and has worked in national and international

nature conservation projects for several years. She has worked for WWF since 1992 on a national and international level.

▶ Bioplastics, one of the building blocks for a more sustainable and a more biobased economy

Erwin VinkNatureWorks and European Bioplastics Association, The Netherlands

During the last few decades the society is slowly starting to realize that it needs to put more effort in sustainable devel-

opment from an economic (the continuing increasing demand for energy, food and materials), social (boosting economic

growth and employment) and environmental (protection) point of view. Major needs are actions against global climate

change and to become less dependent on fossil resources. Therefore national and international authorities recognize

that we need to move to a more biobased economy, a process which is enabled by the fast technological innovations in

Industrial Biotechnology. Bioplastics are seen as one of the new building blocks in this new economy. European Bioplas-

tics represents the European bioplastics industry; NatureWorks is one of the pioneers, producing a family of polylactide

biopolymers. This presentation reviews the achievements and challenges.

About Erwin Vink

Since 1984 Erwin Vink has worked in various functions for The Dow Chemical Company. Since the beginning of the nine-

ties he has been a member of the Dow Europe LCA Core Group working on internal and external LCA projects. During

the years of 1996-2000 he was also responsible for EH&S for products sold by Dow in the Benelux area, and worked part

time for Cargill Dow LLC (today's NatureWorks LLC) focusing on the environmental aspects of the life cycle of IngeoTM

biopolymers. He joined NatureWorks LLC full time in November 2000 as Environmental Affairs Manager. His

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responsibilities include the cradle-to-grave life cycle aspects of the current and future IngeoTM biopolymer production and

development. He provides life cycle information, such as scientific data and documentation, to NatureWorks employees,

customers, NGOs, Universities and Research Institutes and government officials, as well as other external organizations

around the globe. He is active in working groups of European Bioplastics, EuropaBIO, NEN, CEN and ISO.

11:00 Coffee break

11:30 Viewpoints, initiatives and certification schemes on renewable resource use (cont'd)

▶ International Sustainability & Carbon Certification (ISCC) beyond biofuels: Upcoming standards for food, feed, and biomaterials

Stefanie StukenborgSGS, Germany

The Renewable Energy Directive (DIRECTIVE 2009/28/EC) was established to promote the use of energy from renew-

able sources. The sustainable production of renewable energy has to be proven for example by ISCC DE or ISCC EU.

ISCC transferred the requirements for sustainable production of biomass to the food and feed production as well as to

technical/chemical and bioenergy applications which had not been considered yet. This new system is called ISCC PLUS.

The comparability and compatibility of the ISCC systems as well as the application to all kind of biomasses contribute to

transparency and avoids multiple certifications.

About Stefanie Stukenborg

Dr. Stefanie Stukenborg is project manager sustainability at SGS Germany with a focus on the International Sustainability

and Carbon Certification System (ISCC) and REDcert. Before she worked as a research assistant at the institute of animal

breeding and husbandry of Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, researching salmonella in pork. She holds a degree in

agricultural science.

▶ Resource use in meat production – is it possible to put a climate label on red meat?

Anna RichertClimate Certification for Food, Sweden

Red meat is the part of our diets causing the largest climate impact. It is difficult to lower the emissions of methane from

ruminants, and there is a growing consumer and environmental organization movement towards “meat-free Mondays” in

order to lower the consumption of red meat. An initiative has been launched in Sweden since 2010 in order to establish

a climate certification for food. In 2012, the first red meat was certified. This guarantees that climate impact has been

lowered in the meat production. The climate certification focusses on efficient use of energy and nitrogen in the produc-

tion, no soy and mainly locally produced grass as fodder, as well as healthy animals. This guarantees to consumers that

improvements have been made, however small. Scientific analysis of the certification system estimates that the improve-

ments range between 5 and 10 % of climate impact from a general cattle production.

About Anna Richert

Anna Richert is currently project manager working with climate aspects of food production and consumption at one of

Sweden's largest organisations offering standards for food Svenskt Sigill. Her work is focused on development of criteria

for a climate certification for the food chain as a joint venture together with the standards organisation for organic food

KRAV. Her background is in research and consultancy and she has previously carried positions such as senior research

manager on organic fertilisers and farming systems, and manager of a consultancy company with a focus on agricultural

aspects of sustainable sanitation.

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12:30 Conversation lunch

14:00 Individual email / Networking time

14:30 Business viewpoints on carbon footprint reality and plenary discussion "Carbon footprinting – too much talking or real change?"

Business viewpoints on carbon footprint reality will provide an understanding of how carbon footprinting implementation is

taking place in reality and what role it actually plays in driving change.

▶ Tchibo: Carbon Footprint as a value chain management tool

Stefan DierksTchibo, Germany

Hamburg-based retailer Tchibo sells to its customer’s coffee as well as a broad variety of Non Food consumer goods. In

the course of the German pilot project Product Carbon Footprint in 2009, the company assessed the carbon footprint of

a coffee from Tanzania and a sports bag from Asia. On the basis of the results of these exemplary assessments Tchibo

implemented a holistic management approach with the target of a continuous reduction of GHG emissions in the relevant

value chains. Stefan Dierks will give in this presentation an insight into the way Tchibo uses the Carbon Footprinting

method as a managing tool for relevant value chains.

About Stefan Dierks

He coordinates since 2006 as a Senior Manager Corporate Responsibility the environmental and climate protections

measures of Tchibo. Due to this function he is, amongst others, project leader of the Tchibo carbon footprinting projects.

These include a.o. the projects LOTOS and the PCF Pilot Project Germany. Stefan Dierks holds a degree in Environmen-

tal Sciences.

▶ Product environmental labelling: Advancing sustainable consumption and production

Paula Lum Young-BautilLevi Strauss, France

Since 2009, Levi Strauss & Co. has developed in-house LCA capabilities to integrate environmental sustainability in its

product design processes, and supports initiatives aimed at promoting sustainable production and consumption. As a part

of this overall commitment to sustainability, LS&Co volunteered in 2011 to participate in the French National Experiment

on Environmental Labelling under the Grenelle II commitments. The environmental footprint of a selection of Levis’s®

brand products was made available to consumers for one year ending June 30, 2012. The Company carried out consumer

surveys to understand their response to the pioneering pilot. The results will help the Company to improve the design and

impact of such initiatives.

About Paula Lum Young-Bautil

She is part of the Global Social and Environmental Sustainability Department in Levi Strauss & Co. (Levi’s®, Dockers®

and Denizen® brands) and has worked for the past 14 years to build and support programs for environmental compliance

and achieve alignment with the Company’s sustainability vision. Paula has always worked in fields related to applied ecol-

ogy in diverse subjects such as fisheries stock assessment and aquaculture, to environmental management in different

industry. She holds an MSc degree in applied ecology from the Free University of Brussels (VUB).

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▶ Carbon footprint in CPF’s food value chain: Strategy, insights and relevance for international trade

Kularb KimsriCPF, Thailand

CPF has established a product carbon footprint since 2008 by participating in the project "Capacity building of Thai food

industries on carbon footprint labelling to promote the development of low-carbon trade between EU and Thailand for

climate change mitigation", Thailand. -EC Cooperation Facility(Phase I). In 2009, CPF has also participated in the pro-

ject "Thailand Carbon Footprint Labelling Pilot Project" organized by the Thailand Greenhouse Gas Management Organi-

zation TGO). CPF is the first company in Thailand that obtained certified carbon footprint for chicken food products. So

far CPF has PCF certified more than 120 items. The benefit of the PCF leading to CPF green food system is it creates

a greener economy by producing more food as well as protecting and enhancing valuable natural resources. Moreover,

CPF has tried to reduce impacts on the environment for many years for an example, producing electricity from biogas

from waste, including manure from swine farming, and waste water from food processing..

About Kularb Kimsri

Kularb is Assistant Vice President of CPF (Thailand) Public Company Limited. She specializes in various international

standards. She has initiated Quality Management System (ISO 9001), Food Safety (GMP & HACCP) and Environmen-

tal management (ISO 14001) in the company since 1996. In 2007 she has led Environmental Management Accounting

(EMA) to improve environmental management. EMA has changed the view of the management regarding environmental

investment. By partnering environment and business, Kularb has led the Carbon Footprint labeling of products in Thai-

land. She is on the Ad hock committee for Product Category Rule (PCR) and she is a verifier of Product Carbon Footprint.

▶ Carbon footprint at Dole Food Company: An important pillar of sustainability

Roberto VegaDole

Carbon footprint is an interesting tool for companies. It allows them to identify the CO2e emission hotspots of their prod-

ucts and work on measures to reduce them. Roberto Vega will consider the effectiveness of carbon footprinting for real

world CO2e emission reductions at Dole Food Company and its products. He will explain from his experience what other

benefits a carbon footprint provides and how communication is limited and should best be approached. He will also briefly

consider the challenges of applying carbon footprinting in a developing economy context.

About Roberto Vega

Roberto Vega works at Dole Food Company since 1998 where he has held several positions: from Strategic Business

Analysis Manager to Controller of the Organic Program of Latin America. He joined the Corporate Responsibility & Sus-

tainability Department in 2008 and holds the position of Director of Sustainability for Dole worldwide. Roberto represents

Dole in the Steering Committee of the World Banana Forum, the Water Footprint Network, the Fairtrade Product Advi-

sory Council for Bananas and other initiatives. He has coordinated Dole’s Carbon Footprint Analysis and Water Footprint

Assessments of bananas and pineapples. Roberto holds a master’s degree in Business Administration with majors in

Finance and International Business and completed the Sustainability Management Program of INCAE Business School in

Costa Rica.

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Plenary discussion: Quo vadis carbon footprinting – Too much talking or powerful tool for real change?

In a facilitated plenary discussion questions around current reality and perspectives of carbon and environmental footprint-

ing will be explored together:

- Is carbon footprinting a powerful instrument to get to grips with the climate change challenge – or is it not?

- How can we develop it into a more powerful tool for change?

- What should corporate climate change efforts focus on?

- What role do government frameworks, such as the EU environmental footprinting project play? How can it best stimulate

business and climate friendly change?

16:30 Networking time

Based on participant needs and inputs networking and reflection time will be designed to address the most pressing needs

and interests of participants – around carbon and environmental footprinting, renewable resource use or related subjects –

with fellow participants.

17:30 Wrap-Up Day 2

18:00 Closing

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Selected past activities of the PCF World Forum

PCF World Summits

▶ 1st PCF World Summit, Berlin, February 2009International Approaches to Product Carbon Footprinting and Carbon Labelling – The Road Ahead for Business

▶ 2nd PCF World Summit, Berlin, September 2009On the Road to Harmonisation? Business Responsesto Diverging Approaches

▶ 3rd PCF World Summit, Berlin, March 2010Sector Approaches to Product Carbon Footprinting

▶ 4th PCF World Summit, Berlin, October 2010Product Carbon Footprinting: From Standardisationto Communication

▶ 5th PCF World Summit, Zurich, April 2011Implementing the International PCF Standards:Building Credibility in Carbon Footprint Information

▶ 6th PCF World Summit, Berlin, October 2011Environmental Footprinting in Europe and Beyond: How Will it Shape the Corporate Agenda?

▶ 7th PCF World Summit, Berlin, April 2012From Environmental Footprinting to Implementation: Renewable Energy in the Value Chain

Dedicated Workshops

▶ International Standardisation, Legislation and Consistency in Product Carbon Footprinting, Berlin, July 2009

▶ French Environmental Labeling Scheme: What to Expect from Grenelle 2, Berlin, June 2010

▶ First Round Table Product Category Rules, Berlin, October 2010

▶ Second Round Table Product Category Rules, Zurich, April 2011

▶ Third Round Table Product Category Rules, Berlin, October 2011

▶ Fourth Round Table Product Category Rules, Berlin, April 2012

The previous PCF World Summits attracted interest and commitment from more than 450 stakeholders from 30 countries and stimulated wide-ranging discussions.All summits are fully documented. Complete DVDs and individual presentations are available atwww.pcf-world-forum.orgwww.youtube.com/pcfworldforumwww.facebook.com/pcfworldforum

The PCF World Forum was initiated by the Berlin based think-do-tank THEMA1: www.thema1.de

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Participating Organisations

The previous PCF World Summits attracted interest and commitment from more than 400 stakeholders from over 30 countries and stimulated wide-ranging discussions. For the last three years, the PCF World Forum has brought together international stakeholders including senior executives from:

3M4C AssociationAENORADEMEAdidasADM HamburgAENORAISTAkzoNobel Technology & EngineeringAlanus Universityalesco green packagingAlfred RitterAlnaturaAlstom PowerANEC Environment Working GroupANH ImmobilienAsahi Photoproducts EuropeAustrian Research Institute for Chemistry and TechnologyBangor UniversityBarillaBASF BayerBayerische Landesan-stalt für LandwirtschaftBayreuth UniversityBehaviour Change Beiersdorf Berndt & PartnerBio Intelligence Service Blauer EngelBlue Horse AssociatesBP EuropeBREAD & butterBritish CouncilBritish EmbassyBSIBureau de Promotion des Produits du Bois du Québec, CanadaBureau de Normalisation du Québec, CanadaBVL MagazineC.A.R.M.E.N. Canon Switzerland

capitalCarbon Disclosure ProjectCarbon Fix Carbon Footprint of Products Project, JapanCarbon TrustcarboNzeroCasinoCentre for Low Carbon FuturesCentre for Sustainable Consumption and Production / Finnish Environment InstituteChainfood Chair of Economic Geography, BerlinChina National Institute of StandardizationCIRAIGClimatePartnerClimatop CP KelcoCoca-ColaCOLEACPConsumers InternationalCoopcopeCOWICtiflDEKRACUEIMDanonedefra UKdelfortgroupDeloittedenkstattDer SpiegelDeutsche Bahn Deutsche Lebensmittel-rundschauDeutsche Milchwirt-schaft / Trade JournalDeutsche TelekomDevelopment Research NetworkDG Environment

DHL Innovation CenterDigitaleuropeDIN / NAGUSDNVDoyleDQS DSMDuPontDutch Product Board for HorticultureE.ONEarthsterEcoFinanceEcofys UK ecoinventEcology and Environment do BrasilEmbassy of Malawi, GermanyEnviron GermanyEnvironmental EconomistEPDERMErnst & Young EUREFEuropean CommissionEuropean Commission‘s Joint Research CentreEvonikEvonik DegussaFederal Environment Agency, AustriaFederal Environment Agency, GermanyFederal Ministry for Environment, AustriaFederal Ministry for the Environment, GermanyFederal­Press­Office,­GermanyFederal Public Service Environment, DG EnvironmentFederation of German Consumer OrganisationsFedisFindusFinnish Meteorological Institute

First Climate GroupFlo-CertForest Carbon Group Forest Stewardship CouncilFraunhofer IMLFreie Universität BerlinFresenius Medical CareFRoSTAFujitsu Technology So-lutionsFutureCamp ClimateFuturepastGDA GEOGetec Climate ProjectsGHG ProtocolGies KerzenGITEC Consult Glocalist MedienGoodGuideGovernment of QuebecGrantham Research Institute / LSEGreenextGreenpeaceGreenpeace MagazineGroupe Casinogrüneköpfe GS1 GermanyGTZGuangdong Energy Conservation Center, ChinaGuardian UKGUTcertGZETI H&MHartmannHeinekenHeinrich Bauer Produktions HenkelHewlett-PackardHiltiHolcimHoofHop-CubeHugo Boss

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HSEHuntsmannHydroIBM IdeenscoutIHK BerlinIhobeIIIEEILIBIndustrie Forum Design Initiative for Sustainable Use of PaperInnovysInst. for Adv. Study in the HumanitiesInstituto TerraInternational Trade Centre IntertekIseal AllianceISOJEMAIJohnson & JohnsonJustus Liebig University GießenKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyKasetsart University, ThailandKEITI Kellogg EuropeKing Mongkut‘s Universi-ty of Technology Thonbu-ri, ThailandKings College LondonKist Europe KlimAktivKMPGKorea Eco-Products InstituteKorea Specialty Chemi-cal Industry AssociationKRAV ek förKvantita OyLagos State Environ-mental Protection Agency Landcare ResearchLandmark EuropeLebensmittelzeitungLeuphana UniversityLockheed MartinLoNam MagazineLUBW KarlsruheLVT Lebensmittel-verfahrenstechnikMaersk Container IndustryMANMcDonald‘s Europe

memo Merck MieleMigrosMinistry for Sustainable Developement, FranceMinistry of Agriculture and Forestry, New Zea-landMinistry of Economy, Trade and Industrie, JapanMinistry of Economic Development, Innovation and Export of Québec, CanadaMitsubishiMizuho Information & Research InstituteMTT FinlandmyclimateNature & MoreNatureWorksNike Noble Carbon Credits Novozymes NZ Netzeitungofi­Austrian­Research­Institute for Chemistry and TechnologyOrganic & Wellness News / MagazineORSAYOstfalia - University of applied sciencesOstfold ResearchOverseas Environmen-tal Cooperation Center JapanOVIDPA-EuropePanasonic EuropePE InternationalPepsiCoPforzheim UniversityPhilips LightingPlasticsEuropePotsdam Institute for Climate Impact ResearchPRé ConsultantsPriceWaterhouseCoopersPUC RioRainforest AllianceRDC-EnvironmentRecarbon DeutschlandRed OnionRepsol

Research Institute of Organic Agriculture Roland BergerSAINT GOBAIN PACKAGINGSAPSara LeeSavage & HallSCA Hygiene Products SCHOTT Solar Scottish Development InternationalSecretariat ISO 14067SEEAP NepalSER Sustainable Equity ReturnSERISGS Sustainability ServicesSGS Institut FreseniusShell Global SolutionsSIK, the Swedish Institute for Food and Bio technologySoil & More SolarWorldSonterraSony GermanySouth Pole Carbon Asset ManagementSouth West College, UKSteinbeis Centre of Management and TechnologyStiftung WarentestStraubing Centre of ScienceSustainSustainable Business InstituteSustainable Consumption InstituteSvenskt SigillSwedish Environmental Management CouncilSwedish Environmental Protecting AgencySwedish Institute for Food and BiotechnologySwedish Standards InstituteTaiwan Environmental Management Associationtape.tvTchibo TechniData Tengelmann Energie Tesco

Tetra PakThai Carbon Footprint and Labelling Initiative The Climate ConservancyThe Guardian & The ObserverThe Himalayan Global FundThe Sustainability ConsortiumTransitionsTricorona GermanyTUNAP GroupTÜV Nord TÜV Rheinland TÜV Süd UNEP / SETAC Life Cycle InitiativeUnited Nations Environment ProgrammeUnited Nations Industrial Development OrganisationUniversità BolognaUniversità ca‘ FoscariUniversity of BonnUniversity of BremenUniversity of GöttingenUniversity of HohenheimUniversity of ManchesterUniversity of PaduaUniversity of PforzheimUniversity of Technology MunichUniversity of TokyoUniversity of Witten /Her-deckeUPM-KymmeneUPS GermanyUtopiaVertis Environmental Finance VITO NVW.L. Gore & AssociatesWacker Chemie WBCSD / WRIWeGreenWestLBWindMadeWipak Walsrode World Resources InstituteWWFZEIT DIGITALZEIT MagazineZEIT OnlineZero Emissions Technologies

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Registration Form – Fax to +49 30 779 0 779 99 | 8th PCF World Summit | 26-27 September 2012 | Berlin

Renewable Resources in the Value Chain: A Viable Option for Reducing Environmental Footprints?

8th PCF World Summit, Berlin 26-27 Sep 2012

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VenueQuadriga ForumWerderscher Markt 15, 10117 BerlinNear metro U2 Hausvogteiplatzwww.quadriga-forum.de

ProgrammeThe organisers reserve the right to make changes to the programme without notice.

PricesInclude conference drinks and lunch buffet.

PaymentWe will send you an invoice. By registering online on the PCF World Forum webshop, you can pay by credit card: www.pcf-world-forum.org/tickets. Full payment must be received before the event. The organisers reserve the right to limit the number of conference participants.

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Cancellations after 27 July 2012 will incur an administrative charge of 25%. If you cancel your registration after 24 August 2012, we will be obliged to charge the full fee. Please note – you must notify THEMA1 of a cancellation in writing ([email protected]) or we will be obliged to charge the full fee. The organisers reserve the right to make changes to the programme without notice.

Audio / Video RecordingFor documentation purposes the 8th PCF World Summit will be audio and video recorded. By attending the PCF World­Summit­you­consent­to­being­filmed­and­recorded­for documentation and promotion purposes. You release THEMA1 GmbH of any liabilities connected with these recordings and waive all rights to any claims for payment or royalties with regard to the resulting material.

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Additional Information | 8th PCF World Summit | 26-27 September 2012 | Berlin

Renewable Resources in the Value Chain: A Viable Option for Reducing Environmental Footprints?