a national treasure the colorado river is a symbol of the southwest

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A National Treasure The Colorado River is a symbol of the Southwest. Its water is not merely a commodity, but the lifeblood of economies in the seven basin states. Just as humans rely on healthy blood flow for survival, residents of the Southwest rely on water flow from this mighty river to thrive.

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A National Treasure The Colorado River is a symbol of the Southwest.
Its water is not merely a commodity, but the lifeblood of economies in the seven basin states. Just as humans rely on healthy blood flow for survival, residents of the Southwest rely on water flow from this mighty river to thrive. The Basin Region Nearly 40 million Americans depend on the Colorado River for their water supply. The Colorado River Basin spans parts of the seven basin statesArizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming. The Basin covers approximately 242,000 square miles (one-twelfth of the continental U.S.). One of the most critical sources of water in the West. Supplies water for nearly 40 million people for municipal use, irrigates 5.5 million acres of land, and provides water for 22 federally recognized tribes, 7 National Wildlife Refuges, 4 National Recreation Areas, and 11 National Parks. Hydropower facilities along the Colorado River provide more than 4,200 megawatts of electrical generating capacity. Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study More Than Just a Commodity
The Colorado River supports a quarter million jobsand produces $26 billion in economic output from recreational activities alone. This economic output is drawing revenue from the 5.36 million adults who use the Colorado River for a variety of activities each year. Source: Environmental Defense Fund Uncertain Future As water demand formunicipal and agriculturalpurposes increases to servethe needs of growingpopulations, ensuring theavailability of water for non- consumptive uses such asthe environment, recreation,and hydropower becomesincreasingly challenging. Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study Uncertain Future As water demand formunicipal and agriculturalpurposes increases to servethe needs of growingpopulations, ensuring theavailability of water for non- consumptive uses such asthe environment, recreation,and hydropower becomesincreasingly challenging. Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study Population Colorado River Basin States | 2014
0.58M 2.84M 2.94M 5.36M 38.80M 6.73M 2.09M Colorado River Basin Population Total = 59.34M U.S. Total = M Colorado River Basin Share of U.S. Population = 18.6% Note: California makes up 65.4% of total Colorado River Basin population. Colorado River Basin Total: 59.34M United States Total: M Source: U.S. Census Bureau, population estimates as of July 1 of each year Population Growth State Comparisons | 2013-2014
United States: +0.7% Excludes District of Columbia Source: U.S. Census Bureau, population estimates as of July 1 of each year, Population Growth Colorado River Basin States | 2013-2014
+0.2% +1.7% +1.4% +1.6% +1.0% +1.5% -0.1% Colorado River Basin Population Total YoY Growth = +1.1% (59.3M in 2014 vs 58.7M in 2013) U.S. Population Growth = +0.7% Colorado River Basin Share of U.S. Population = 18.6% Colorado River Basin Total: +1.1% United States Total: +0.7% Source: U.S. Census Bureau, population estimates as of July 1 of each year, Population Growth Colorado River Basin States | 2004-2014
+14.7% +21.0% +22.5% +17.1% +9.1% +19.1% +9.6% Colorado River Basin Population Total Growth 2004 vs 2014 = +12.0% (59.3M in 2014 vs. 53.0M in 2004) U.S. Population Growth = +8.9% Colorado River Basin Share of U.S. Population = 18.6% Colorado River Basin Total: +12.0% United States Total: +8.9% Source: U.S. Census Bureau, population estimates as of July 1 of each year, Employment Colorado River Basin States | 2015
Trailing 12-Month Average; Establishment-based Employment. Colorado River Basin Employment Total = 24.91M U.S. Employment = M Colorado River Basin Share of U.S. Employment = 17.6% Note: California makes up about 64.4% of total Colorado River Basin employment. Colorado River Basin Total: 24.91M United States Total: M Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, estimates as of October 2015, Not Seasonally Adjusted Employment Growth State Comparisons | 2014-2015
United States: +1.9% Excludes District of Columbia Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Establishment-Based Employment Growth, October 2014 vs. October 2015, Not Seasonally Adjusted Employment Growth Colorado River Basin States | 2014-2015
+0.2% +3.4% +3.5% +2.1% +2.9% +2.3% +0.3% Colorado River Basin Employment Growth Average (TTM) = +2.7% U.S. Employment Growth Average (TTM) = +1.9% Colorado River Basin Share of U.S. Employment = 17.6% Colorado River Basin Average: +2.7% United States Average: +1.9% Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Establishment-Based Employment Growth, October 2014 vs. October 2015, Not Seasonally Adjusted Employment Growth Colorado River Basin States | 2005-2015
+9.9% +2.0% +19.7% +13.1% +7.7% +4.1% +1.9% Colorado River Basin Employment Growth Average (TTM) = 7.9% U.S. Employment Growth Average (TTM) = 6.0% Colorado River Basin Share of U.S. Employment = 17.6% Colorado River Basin Average: +7.9% United States Average: +6.0% Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Establishment-Based Employment Growth, October 2005 vs. October 2015, Not Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rate State Comparisons | October 2015
United States: 5.0% Excludes District of Columbia Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rate Colorado River Basin States | 2005-2015
New Mexico: 6.8% Nevada: 6.6% Arizona: 6.1% California: 5.8% Wyoming: 4.0% United States Unemployment Rate: 5.0% Average Colorado River Basin States Unemployment Rate: 5.2% Colorado: 3.8% Utah: 3.6% Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Seasonally Adjusted Private Businesses Colorado River Basin States | Q1 2015
24.4K 76.5K 87.8K 180.5K 1.4M 53.0K 147.5K Latest available data. Colorado River Basin Private Businesses Total = 1.94M U.S. Total = 9.17M Upper Basin Share of U.S. Private Businesses = 21.2% Note: California makes up 70.7% of total Colorado River Basin private businesses. Colorado River Basin Total: 1.9M United States Total: 9.2M Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Gross Domestic Product Colorado River Basin States | 2014
Colorado River Basin GDP Total = $3.3 trillion U.S. Total GDP = $17.3 trillion Colorado River Basin Share of U.S. GDP = 19.1% Note: California makes up 69.8% of total Colorado River Basin GDP and 13.3% of US GDP. Colorado River Basin Total: $3.3T United States Total: $17.3T Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis Total = $1,298 billion Source: Arizona State University, The Economic Importance of the Colorado River to the Basin Region Gross Domestic Product State Comparisons | 2014
United States Average: $344.0B Excludes District of Columbia Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis Personal Income Colorado River Basin States | 2014
Colorado River Basin Personal Income Total = $2.8 trillion U.S. Personal Income = $14.7 trillion Colorado River Basin Share of U.S. Personal Income = 19.0% Note: California accounts for 69.5% of total Colorado River Basin personal income. Colorado River Basin Total: $2.8T United States Total: $14.7T Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis Personal Income Per Capita State Comparisons | 2014
United States: $46,129 Excludes District of Columbia Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis The river supports a diversity of industries located in the seven Colorado River basin states, including a $26 billion recreation economy that is not fully accounted for in the ASU study. Source: Arizona State University, The Economic Importance of the Colorado River to the Basin Region The Challenge The future of the Colorado River is at risk because demand for the water is already exceeding its supply. If we do not address the problem, the Colorado River cannot continue to support the 40 million people who depend on it. Picture is of Echo Bay at Lake Mead (2015) Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation The Challenge The future of the Colorado River is at risk because demand for the water is already exceeding its supply. If we do not address the problem, the Colorado River cannot continue to support the 40 million people who depend on it. Picture is of Echo Bay at Lake Mead (2015) Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation For more than 14years, the basin and theWestern states havebeen plagued bydrought. Almost everyyear, all of the waterfrom the Colorado Riveris pumped out beforeemptying into the Gulf ofMexico. Source: The Washington Post, Online Edition 3/30/2015 Lake Powell at 45 Percent of Capacity
Lake Powell is at 45 percent of capacity and is at risk of its surface elevation falling to the lowest level on record. Source: The Washington Post, Online Edition 3/30/2015 Update: As of 12/13/15, Lake Powell is at 49.7% of capacity. Source: The Washington Post, Online Edition 3/30/2015 Beach That Used To Be at the Bottom
Lake Powell: A beach that used to be at the bottom of the lake. Source: The Washington Post, Online Edition 3/30/2015 Glen Canyon Dam: The divider between the Upper and Lower Colorado River Basins
Source: The Washington Post, Online Edition 3/30/2015 Lake Powell: The Bathtub Ring Water Shortage Impacts Alabama (2007): Temperatures were higher than those witnessed in more than 50 years:
1. The Tennessee Valley Authority shut down one of three reactors at Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant to avoid heating the Tennessee River to dangerous levels (first icon). 2. Power bills increased because there was not enough water to produce hydroelectric power (second icon). Nevada (2008): A report detailing the impacts of potential water shortages noted the following:
1. Population growth would be hurt. 2. Consumer spending would decline (first icon). 3. Golfing would be one of the h