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  • ADDENDUM—

    Engaging Students for Enhanced Reading Comprehension

    Compiled by Dr. BJ Wiemer ACSI 2016 Professional Development Forum (O’Fallon, MO)

    Teaching Ideas after reading

     Extended Anticipation Guide  Rating Scale  Thick and Thin Questions  3-2-1  Save the Last Word for Me  Summary Cubes  Minute Papers  Graphic/Visual Organizers

    Teaching Ideas before Reading

     Anticipation/Reaction Guides  KWL  Expectation Grid  Give One, Get One  Book Tour/Picture Walk  Making Connections  Predict-o-Grams  Present New Vocabulary

    Teaching Ideas during Reading

     Visualization  Topic-Detail-Main Idea  Text Coding/Post-it Notes  QAR  Running Records  Response Journals  Monitoring and Clarifying  Graphic/Visual Organizers

  • ADDENDUM—

    Engaging Students for Enhanced Reading Comprehension

    Compiled by Dr. BJ Wiemer ACSI 2016 Professional Development Forum (O’Fallon, MO)

    Teaching Ideas before Reading

     Anticipation/Reaction Guides (To give purpose to reading and reinforce key concepts or vocabulary)

     KWL (To affirm prior knowledge, set purpose to reading, and note new information)

    K W L

    1. Write 3-5 statements related to the informational text. The statements may or may not all be true.

    2. Before reading the text, ask students to read each statement.

    3. Students circle whether they agree or disagree with each statement.

    4. Read the selection. 5. Read back through each statement and ask

    students to decide whether or not they would change their original response.

    6. If they decide they would change their answer, how would they write it to agree with the statement?

    1. Brainstorm with the students about what they know about the given topic. All answers are written in the K column.

    2. Discuss what students might like to learn about the topic. Write these items in the W column. 3. Have students read the assigned text. 4. After reading, students list what they have learned from their reading in the final (L) column. 5. Go back to the first column (K) and make changes to facts, as needed. 6. See if all of the students’ questions have been answered from the W column. 7. Use the information recorded to summarize what students know about the subject.

    Spice it up with some alternative materials and procedures such as using different colored post-it notes, notecards,

    or large chart paper. Try working with a partner or set a timer for completing each part.

  • ADDENDUM—

    Engaging Students for Enhanced Reading Comprehension

    Compiled by Dr. BJ Wiemer ACSI 2016 Professional Development Forum (O’Fallon, MO)

     Expectation Grid (To provide overview of topic and key vocabulary)

     Give One, Get One (To provide overview of topic and key vocabulary.

     

     Book Tour/Picture Walk (To provide overview of the text)

    1. Have students write the title or main topic in the center of their grid.

    2. Students will skim the assigned reading selection looking for information or vocabulary to be added to each grid.

    3. After reading, complete the grids with specific details for each concept or word.

    4. Discuss the different details students found in their reading.

    Mosquito-

    borne illness

    Dengue

    Fever

    Seems

    effective/ 79% British company

    Vaccines

    ineffective

    1. Have students skim over their reading selection jotting down any information they find interesting, important or unusual in the first column.

    2. Have students pair up and share the information they wrote on their sheet with their partner.

    3. If the partner provides something that is new, the student writes it in the second column.

    4. When done, discuss what has been shared with the class.

    Preview the text with the students

    “walking” through each page of the

    selection. Point out the differences

    when reading a non-fiction from a

    narrative text. Discuss how formats

    such as headings, bold print, and

    illustrations help to organize and

    present the material for easier

    learning. Begin to predict what will

    be learned in the selection.

  • ADDENDUM—

    Engaging Students for Enhanced Reading Comprehension

    Compiled by Dr. BJ Wiemer ACSI 2016 Professional Development Forum (O’Fallon, MO)

     Making Connections

     Predict-o-Grams (To predict using selected elements in the selection)

     Present New Vocabulary

    Bring in pictures or items to help

    familiarize students with something

    they’ve never seen or experienced. Try

    to make links to that which is familiar to

    them.

    1. Select key vocabulary from the text. 2. Have students work with partners to

    decide under which heading the word should be included.

    3. Read the selection. Make changes, if needed.

    Young

    Habitat

    Feeding

    Threats

    Habitat

    Habitat

    Habitat

    Adaptations

    Vocabulary Words:

    Bering Sea

    McLaughlin & Allen (2009). Guided Comprehension in Grades 3-8. International Reading Association.

    • Focus on key vocabulary • Include signal and directional words • Connect to book tour with pix and charts • Highlight, post-its, notecards, flip charts, t-notes • Decode, analyze, spell • Use it or lose it!

  • ADDENDUM—

    Engaging Students for Enhanced Reading Comprehension

    Compiled by Dr. BJ Wiemer ACSI 2016 Professional Development Forum (O’Fallon, MO)

    Teaching Ideas during Reading

     Visualization  Graphic/Visual Organizers  Guided Imagery

     Pictographs of the Mind

     Topic-Detail-Main Idea

    1. Read a selection aloud to the students. 2. As you read, students “doodle” whatever

    comes to mind as they listen. Encourage them to include details for what is being read.

    3. If there are specific parts, have students stop at each section and start a new drawing for the next part.

    4. After reading, have students share what they have drawn and discuss the key concepts in the selection.

    Change it up by using small post-it pads or have students

    on large mural-size paper. Others may enjoy drawing with

    a partner.

    1. Create two-column notes to be completed as the students read through the text.

    2. Begin with the main topic. 3. JOTT details: Just One Two or Three words. 4. Write a question for each detail. 5. After reading, JOTT a main idea, or summary

    of the selection. (This may involve may than three words.)

  • ADDENDUM—

    Engaging Students for Enhanced Reading Comprehension

    Compiled by Dr. BJ Wiemer ACSI 2016 Professional Development Forum (O’Fallon, MO)

     Text Coding/Post-it Notes (This is especially helpful for students who forget or do not readily participate in class discussions because they “have nothing to say.”)

     QAR: Question-Answer Relationships (To encourage self-questioning/making connections)

    1. Have a stack of post-it notes available for each student.

    2. As the student reads, a post-it note is used to label specific parts of information to be remembered or for which the student has questions or may find particularly interesting.

    3. If the student can write in the text, symbols can be used directly on the page (? ! +) instead of post-it notes.

    In the Text

    In My Head

    Think & Search-

    Right There-

    Author & You-

    On Your Own-

    1. As students read, they create questions about what they have read.

    2. Examples of QAR questions include: • Right There- the answer is within

    one sentence in the text. • Think & Search-the answer is

    found in more than one sentence in the text.

    • Author & You- the answer needs information from the student’s background knowledge and text.

    • On Your Own- the answer needs information from only the student’s background knowledge.

    3. Discuss why they thought of the question and what response they would expect in answer to it.

    McLaughlin & Allen (2009). Guided Comprehension in Grades 3-8. International Reading Association.

  • ADDENDUM—

    Engaging Students for Enhanced Reading Comprehension

    Compiled by Dr. BJ Wiemer ACSI 2016 Professional Development Forum (O’Fallon, MO)

     Running records  Stop-Think-Write

     Fab Four Door Chart

     Response Journals

    1. Have students begin reading a selected text. 2. After 2-3 minutes, call, “Stop!” 3. Students write down whatever comes to mind from

    their reading. This may be something they learned; connections they made; questions they have; or interesting words or ideas.

    4. After a couple minutes for writing, resume reading. 5. Repeat the process until the text is completed. 6. Discuss the students’ responses.

    Lori Oczkus

    1. Create four flaps for students’ responses using a large sheet of