air logistics of alaska wins alyeska contract renewal

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Bristow World 2007 / Issue III ISSUE 3 / 2007 A seven-year contract extension with Alyeska Pipeline Service Company in Alaska will keep 20 pilots and mechanics busy providing comprehensive services to one of Air Logistics’ longest-running customers. Air Logistics of Alaska has provided aviation services to Alyeska, the operator of the 800-mile Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), for more than 26 years. The con- tract extension went into effect June and initially calls for five helicopters – one BO- 05, two Bell 407s and two Bell 206L-3s. “Alyeska is presently our largest customer in Alaska, so this is clearly an important contract for us,” says Dave Scarbrough, director of Marketing. Missions for Alyeska include flying security personnel along the pipeline, coupled with operations and maintenance activities and oil spill response support. The terrain ranges from offshore to 6,000-foot snow-covered peaks, and pilots can face temperatures of -40˚ F in winter and 85˚ F in summer. “The variety of mission tasks the flight and maintenance crews confront and the Air Logistics of Alaska wins Alyeska contract renewal environmental conditions make it a pretty interesting contract,” Scarbrough says. Aircraft and crews are stationed at five locations along TAPS. Pilots supporting the contract are required to have Airline Trans- port Licenses and First-Class Medicals. Stretching from Prudhoe Bay on Alaska’s North Slope to the pipeline terminus at Val- dez, the northernmost ice-free port in North America, TAPS has carried more than 5 billion barrels of oil since start-up in 977. Snow-covered communications repeater sites along the pipeline make interesting-looking landmarks for pilots. Move to global standards gains momentum The formation of a corporate global standards group is the latest step in building a one-team approach to flight operations, flight mainte- nance and engineering, and safety. Led by Bill Hopkins, vice president of Global Standards, the new organization complements the efforts begun several years ago by teams of Bristow and Air Logistics pilots, engineers and mainte- nance people. Those teams will continue to develop and recommend standards. Global Standards will help coordinate those efforts to develop and promote the standards worldwide. (continued on page 7) Air Logistics pilots fly from five locations along the entire 800-mile-long Trans Alaska Pipeline System, one of the largest pipeline systems in the world. Passenger surveys under way in New Iberia, Aberdeen In July, Bristow began surveys of passengers in New Iberia and Aberdeen to measure and help improve the service they receive. Surveys of the aviation customers that hire Bristow also are part of the effort, which is designed to give Bristow operations managers and marketers the information they need to improve and promote service quality. Look for the passenger surveys to be ex- panded in October if the tests in New Iberia and Aberdeen are successful, says Stuart Walker, manager, Planning. “The survey will monitor passengers’ views toward safety, the overall in-flight experience, arrival and departure processes, and the Bristow brand,” Walker says. “The operations goal is to improve service levels, but there’s also a marketing goal. We want to provide decision makers with service information that will help them recognize the value Bristow provides.” In October, Bristow managers will be able to access the survey information in near real-time using a “dashboard” application on their PCs. Bill Hopkins

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Issue 3 / 2007
A seven-year contract extension with Alyeska Pipeline Service Company in Alaska will keep 20 pilots and mechanics busy providing comprehensive services to one of Air Logistics’ longest-running customers.
Air Logistics of Alaska has provided aviation services to Alyeska, the operator of the 800-mile Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), for more than 26 years. The con- tract extension went into effect June and initially calls for five helicopters – one BO- 05, two Bell 407s and two Bell 206L-3s.
“Alyeska is presently our largest customer in Alaska, so this is clearly an important contract for us,” says Dave Scarbrough, director of Marketing.
Missions for Alyeska include flying security personnel along the pipeline, coupled with operations and maintenance activities and oil spill response support. The terrain ranges from offshore to 6,000-foot snow-covered peaks, and pilots can face temperatures of -40 F in winter and 85 F in summer.
“The variety of mission tasks the flight and maintenance crews confront and the
Air Logistics of Alaska wins Alyeska contract renewal
environmental conditions make it a pretty interesting contract,” Scarbrough says.
Aircraft and crews are stationed at five locations along TAPS. Pilots supporting the contract are required to have Airline Trans- port Licenses and First-Class Medicals.
Stretching from Prudhoe Bay on Alaska’s North Slope to the pipeline terminus at Val- dez, the northernmost ice-free port in North America, TAPS has carried more than 5 billion barrels of oil since start-up in 977.
Snow-covered communications repeater sites along the pipeline make interesting-looking landmarks for pilots.
Move to global standards gains momentum
The formation of a corporate global standards group is the latest step in building a one-team approach to flight operations, flight mainte- nance and engineering, and safety.
Led by Bill Hopkins, vice president of Global Standards, the new organization complements the efforts begun several years ago by teams of Bristow and Air Logistics pilots, engineers and mainte- nance people. Those teams will continue to develop and recommend standards. Global Standards will help coordinate those efforts to develop and promote the standards worldwide. (continued on page 7)
Air Logistics pilots fly from five locations along the entire 800-mile-long Trans Alaska Pipeline System, one of the largest pipeline systems in the world.
Passenger surveys under way in New Iberia, Aberdeen
In July, Bristow began surveys of passengers in New Iberia and Aberdeen to measure and help improve the service they receive.
Surveys of the aviation customers that hire Bristow also are part of the effort, which is designed to give Bristow operations managers and marketers the information they need to improve and promote service quality.
Look for the passenger surveys to be ex- panded in October if the tests in New Iberia and Aberdeen are successful, says Stuart Walker, manager, Planning.
“The survey will monitor passengers’ views toward safety, the overall in-flight experience, arrival and departure processes, and the Bristow brand,” Walker says. “The operations goal is to improve service levels, but there’s also a marketing goal. We want to provide decision makers with service information that will help them recognize the value Bristow provides.”
In October, Bristow managers will be able to access the survey information in near real-time using a “dashboard” application on their PCs.
Bill Hopkins
HeLICOPTeR seRVICes
sOuTHeAsT AsIA shell Development Australia The current contract for one AS 332L sup- porting a drilling campaign in the Browse Basin, based out of Broome in Western Australia, has been extended until Decem- ber 2009. A second AS 332L will be added to the contract on November , 2007.
santos A 2-month contract (including options) began in June for an AS 332L based out of Karratha, Western Australia. The helicopter supports a drilling campaign on the North West Shelf.
Aviation Consortium Bristow has established a consortium of Woodside, BHP Billiton and Apache Energy for aviation support based out of Learmonth, Western Australia. Initial support provides up to two AS 332Ls and one S-76A+, along with management of Learmonth heliport and travel logistics support, including manage- ment of fixed wing. Previously, this work was performed under separate contracts.
PRODuCTION MANAGeMeNT Grasso Production Management has won new Gulf of Mexico contracts from Hunt Oil, National Offshore, Hunt Crude, Conn Energy, Merit Energy and Apache Corporation. The work ranges from production management and loop assignments to barge loading.
MeDIC seRVICes Medic Systems has won contracts for a combination of paramedics and support personnel in the Gulf of Mexico and the Rocky Mountains. Customers include Mariner Energy, Veritas Geophysical, ExxonMobil and BP.
Paul Gliddon flies into retirement
After 34 years with Bristow, Paul Gliddon is retiring. Most recently the head of the Southeast Asia Business Unit, Gliddon is a pilot with more than 3,000 hours of flying experience in the North Sea,
Dubai and Nigeria. Following being appoint- ed chief pilot in 989 and managing pilot in 990, he became manager of European Operations Quality in 997.
power recovery. Flights are two hours long and are scheduled back-to-back.
After a debrief, I’m ready for the next stu- dent. That second session might be a simu- lated IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) flight, with the student under a hood flying the ILS (Instrument Landing System) 36 approach to Space Coast Regional Airport or the VOR (VHF Omni-directional Radio Range) 9R at the nearby Melbourne airport.
Some days I also work in the simula- tor with a beginning instrument student to prepare their visual scanning technique and procedures for instrument approaches. This is a welcome break, as I get to enjoy the simulator’s powerful air conditioning while my student sweats out an NDB (Non-direc- tional Beacon) hold with a strong crosswind.
Sometimes I have a night cross-country scheduled. Not all my days are quite so long, though, as I teach ground school just five days a month. Still, it’s almost always hectic. While I’m not teaching ground school, I typically schedule simulated IFR flights for the early morning hours to avoid afternoon thunderstorms that pop up around 400 hours like clockwork in the summer. On days when the weather pre- vents flying, my schedule is all one-on-one ground sessions.
I enjoy the variety in my workday. Working outdoors and being able to call the cockpit of a helicopter my “office” make it quite worthwhile. The feeling of accomplishment I get when a student passes a checkride always gives me a boost because I know that I’ve really helped them do something significant. It’s not easy being a flight in- structor, but right now I wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.
What’s it like to teach at Bristow Academy in Titusville, Florida? We asked instructor Ben Kao for a bird’s-eye view.
I’ve been instructing at Bristow Academy since January 2007, and let me tell you, it’s a hectic lifestyle. We strive to provide the highest standards of instruction. That means giving as much time as possible to students. Sometimes that requires giving up some personal time, but I’m not complain- ing. After all, I’m working at the largest civil- ian and (in my opinion) the best helicopter flight training academy in the world. And I love it.
I’m originally from the Washington, D.C., area, although I was born in Wisconsin (yup, I’m a reformed cheese-head). Being Ameri- can puts me in the minority here. Most of our students and many of our instructors right now are from Norway, but usually we have many students from around the globe. Our hangar is decorated with the flags of their nations.
My typical day starts out teaching ground school at 0800 hours. I teach Weather and Weather Services to the FAA Private Ground School class. Classes range from 8 to 20 students, and they are a diverse bunch. My first ground school class included a group from the Nigerian Army, one student from the Seychelles Islands and, of course, some Norwegians.
Ground school runs until 200 hours, and then I’m off to flight line to meet with my first student. Usually it’s a VFR (Visual Flight Rules) flight with a pre-private-level student. That involves doing some autorota- tions, quick stops or practicing settling with
My Job Teaching at Bristow Academy
Ben Kao loves teaching and flying.
Approximately 45 flight instructors use more than 50 helicopters to teach beginning pilots at Bristow Academy in Florida and California.
Paul Gliddon
by Guy Pilcher-Clayton, Chief Engineer Atyrau-Bristow Airways Services (ABAS)
In this column we highlight how Bristow people around the world are putting the company’s values into action.
Quality and excellence In some countries where Bristow operates, the road to quality and excellence is paved with consistent, gradual improvement. In Kazakhstan, often the road isn’t paved at all. We face ob-
stacles that require us to create new paths. When we do that, the improvements can be relatively sudden and amazing – even to us.
First, a little background. Working in Ka- zakhstan requires flexibility, hard work and a sense of humor. We face temperatures that range from -40º C (-40º F) in winter to +45º C (3º F) in summer. To commute to work, Bristow employees travel between continents. The town of Atyrau, where our base is located, is on the Ural River, on the border between Europe and Asia.
Adversity anyone? On February 2, 2006, when the wind chill factor made it feel like -65º C, we were in- formed that our hangar rent was going to be increased by 750 percent. Our other option? Move, with one day’s notice. Of course, we had to maintain 00 percent availability for our client, Agip KCO, during the move.
Somehow we did exactly that. Fortunate- ly, our local partner had an available hangar. We begged, borrowed and scrounged manpower, transport and lifting equipment. It was all hands to the deck, including off- duty pilots.
Our move to a new hangar was followed a few days later by the start of a “D” check. D checks require, more or less, that you take apart the entire helicopter for inspec- tion. It takes more space and time than all other kinds of maintenance checks.
Neither of these assignments had our engineering team of 20 jumping for joy, to say the least. Then we discovered the silver lining. We had the opportunity to restart our engineering operation from scratch. It was a chance to take all that was good with us and leave behind all that was not.
Better than ever During the following months we provided a high level of availability for the client, com- pleted back-to-back D checks and rebuilt our engineering operation. In October, the
UK CAA Auditor said that we were better than ever.
Far from resting on our laurels, we are now focused on improving our excel- lent safety record, upgrading our facilities and increasing the level of training for our national engineers in order to win a major contract extension with Agip KCO in 2009.
I know that other Bristow operations face their own challenges to delivering quality and excellence. We’ve certainly faced ours in Kazakhstan. I’m proud and surprised at what we’ve accomplished.
Core Values in Action
Guy Pilcher- Clayton
On May 2, 2007, the company completed its first commercial flights in Kazakhstan with the S-76C++. Less than two weeks later, the prime minister of Kazakhstan flew on one of the new helicopters to tour offshore oil installations.
Management Changes
Grant Ireland, formerly manager of Techni- cal Services, Eastern Hemisphere, and Mark Fontenot, formerly operations manager for the South American Business Unit, have joined the new Global Standards team in Houston. Ireland will manage global engineer- ing/maintenance standards, while Fontenot will manage global flight operations standards. … Juan Camarillo is the new internal audit
director, reporting to General Counsel Randy Stafford as well as Ken Tamblyn, chairman of the Audit Committee. … Gary Tucker is headed back to New Iberia from Alaska to fill the newly created position of Air Logistics operations quality and standards manager. … Paul Blackburn takes up the new post of financial controller for Eastern Hemisphere Central- ized Operations. … Mark embleton becomes Eastern Hemisphere finance manager
on September . … Brad Beaver has joined Bristow Academy as accounting manager.
Brad Beaver
Gary Tucker
Bristow Core Values
Bristow’s values represent our core beliefs about how we conduct our business.
• Safety — Safety first! • Quality and Excellence — Set and achieve high standards in everything we do. • Integrity — Do the right thing. • Fulfillment — Develop our talents and enjoy our work. • Teamwork — Communicate openly and respect each other. • Profitability — Make wise decisions and help grow the business.
Faced with a 750 percent hangar rent increase, Bristow in Kazakhstan relocated overnight. Currently, offices are being added within the hangar.
4 Bristow World 2007 / Issue III
BeTTeR TOGeTHeR Joint ventures help Bristow grow, serve customers
JVs are also created for special purposes. UK Air Rescue, a UK company jointly owned by Bristow, Serco and FB Heliservices (a Bristow JV), was created to compete for a huge search and rescue contract in the United Kingdom.
Typically, Bristow has 50 percent or less ownership of individual joint ventures. In some cases, Bristow employees have day- to-day management responsibilities. In all cases, we have representation on JV boards of directors.
Affiliating with Bristow helps local provid- ers to capitalize on our capabilities and reputation. Most JV affiliates have adopted the Bristow Code of Business Integrity, as well as our core values and safety standards. Some joint venture affiliates even adopt the Bristow brand.
“Joint venture affiliates are an important part of the Bristow team and facilitate our business opportunities overseas,” says Allan Blake, director of Corporate Affairs, Eastern Hemisphere. “As we expand more interna- tionally, they’ll continue to be essential to our success.”
From Mexico to Egypt to Russia and beyond, Bristow depends on joint ventures with local companies to provide customers with safe and reliable helicopter services.
Bristow joint ventures operate more than 40 aircraft and perform duties ranging from oil company crew changes to fire-fighting to medical evacuation. They are essential to our success. In fact, in many countries we couldn’t operate without them.
Local laws frequently restrict or prohibit foreign ownership of airlines and foreign companies from obtaining aviation operating certificates. Joint ventures with local opera- tors enable us to serve customers around the world and comply with all local laws. Joint ventures also allow us to reduce risk, preserve capital, add capabilities and benefit from local market knowledge.
“Joint ventures give us immediate access to local pilots, engineers and professional managers,” says Pedro Blazquez, who man- ages the Other International and Southeast Asia business units. He estimates that more than 50 percent of revenue from Other Inter- national comes from JVs in Russia, Kazakh- stan, Turkmenistan and Egypt.
MAJOR JOINT VeNTuRes
Atyrau-Bristow Airways services (ABAs) Location: Kazakhstan Bristow ownership: 49% Number of employees: 50 Aircraft: 4 Primary aircraft: S-76C++, B22 (provided by Bristow), Mi-8MTV (provided by Atyrau Aye Zholy) Major customer: Agip Kazakhstan North Caspian Operating Company N.V. Passengers flown in 2006: 26,574 Highlights: Provides crew change flights to North Caspian platforms, together with SAR cover, VIP flights and ice surveys.
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5Bristow World 2007 / Issue III
In fiscal 2007, joint ventures provided $68 million in value to Bristow, a combination of revenues from aircraft leases and earnings from equity.
Aviashelf Location: Russia Bristow ownership: 48.5% Number of employees: 96 Aircraft: 7, including aircraft operated by Sakhalin Bristow Air Services Primary aircraft: Mi-8MTV, Mi-8T Major customer: Shell/Gazprom consortium (Sakhalin Energy Investment Corporation) Passengers flown in 2006: 209,29 Highlights: Flies crew changes to platforms and marine drilling ships. Additional assign- ments include ice patrol flights, cargo flights, fire-fighting, filming, search and rescue, grass seeding, oil and gas pipeline works, medical evacuation for Sakhalin hospital.
Heliservicio Campeche Location: Mexico Bristow ownership: 49% Number of employees: 95 Aircraft: 23 Primary aircraft: Bell 42 Major customers: Mexican Federal Electric Commission, PEMEX Passengers flown in 2006: 7,775 Highlights: Provides crew transportation, tower lifting, seismic surveys, fire-fighting support. A longtime provider of services to Mexican national oil company PEMEX, Heliservicio stands to benefit from increased deepwater exploration.
FB Heliservices Location: United Kingdom Bristow ownership: 50% Number of employees: 646 Aircraft: 60 Primary aircraft: Bell 22, Eurocopter Squirrel, Bell 42EP Griffin Major customer: Ministry of Defence Helicopter Flying School (British Army/RAF/ Navy) Highlights: Joint venture begun in 995 with FR Aviation Group (part of Cobham PLC). Provides helicopters and associated services to the military and governments worldwide. Has 5-year contract to supply helicopters and instructors for a school that trains all UK military helicopter pilots.
Norsk Helikopter Location: Norway Bristow ownership: 49% Number of employees: 20 Aircraft: 3 Primary aircraft: Eurocopter AS 332 L and L2 Super Puma, Sikorsky S-76 C+, Sikorsky S-92A Major customers: Statoil, ExxonMobil, BP, Talisman Energy, TotalFinaElf and ConocoPhillips Passengers flown in 2006: 245,000 Highlights: Provides transportation and search and rescue in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. Also owns Lufttransport, which operates 26 aircraft and provides air ambulance services in Scandinavia.
Petroleum Air services Location: Egypt Bristow ownership: 25% Number of employees: 827 Aircraft: 45 Primary aircraft: Bell 42, 22, 206; Dash 7 and 8 Major customers: BP, Shell, Petrobel, Gupco/BP, IEOC/ENI Passengers flown in 2006: 366,986 Highlights: In addition to providing helicop- ter and fixed-wing support for the oil and gas industry, PAS charters spare fixed-wing capacity to tourism operators. The majority owner is Egyptian General Petroleum Corpo- ration. PAS was established in 982.
Turkmenistan Helicopters Location: Turkmenistan Bristow ownership: 5% Number of employees: 20 Aircraft: Primary aircraft: S-76A++ Major customer: Petronas Carigali (Turkmenistan) Sdn. Bhd. (PCT) Passengers flown in 2006: 7,52 Highlights: JV formed in 998. Has pro- vided helicopter services for two short-term campaigns and one long-term program.
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Maintain responsiveness To win a large market share requires industry-leading responsiveness. On-time flights is just one example of the performance indicators we use to gauge and help guide improvement.
The other part of being an industry leader is developing new products, services and technologies. The industry knows us for HUMS (Health and Usage Monitoring Systems) and HOMP (Helicopter Operations Monitoring Program). Recently, we led the development of the ALERTS flight data recorder and playback system for small, analog helicopters.
Expanding Grasso Production Management is another priority. Led by Mike Simon, Grasso is looking at adding service lines in the Gulf of Mexico and expanding internationally. We believe an active and expanding energy industry will provide plenty of opportunities.
William E. Chiles President and CEO
In the previous issue of Bristow World, I described the role that employees play in our five-year strategy. This issue, I want to focus on the customer portion of our strategy.
Unlike some competitors that compete primarily on price, Bristow focuses on key customers that value quality and safety as much as we do. Typically, these customers are major oil companies, large independents and national oil companies. These market leaders are willing to pay more for service, but they also expect more in return.
These customers value relationships with their suppliers in which both parties win. That’s what Bristow wants, too. We want customers that will share their strategies and plans with us, develop performance expectations with us and provide financial incentives for exceeding those expectations.
Achieve top market position Our goal is to be one of the leaders in every strategic market where we operate. To do that we have to stay aware of our customers’ strategies and the market dynamics. It’s clear that major oil companies will remain a large part of our business, but national oil companies will grow in importance. As always, we’ll go where the work is and position ourselves in geographic markets where key customers are expanding.
How are we doing toward achieving our goal of market leadership? Excellent. We are no. or no. 2 in market share in all but a few countries where we operate. We are implementing strategies in those few countries and in new markets to gain the no. or no. 2 position.
To grow in key future markets such as North Africa, Southeast Asia and South America, we may have to start small. Our recent project in Kenya is an example. While this first job was relatively small, it’s a good starting place for becoming a major provider in the emerging East Africa basin.
We also look for complementary businesses that require our skills and equipment. Search and rescue (SAR) work is a prime example. We’re extremely proud of our long SAR track record in the United Kingdom. We believe this experience can help us win SAR business in other markets, with both governments and companies.
strategy targets demanding customers
Focus on Key Customers • Manage proactively the evolving marketplace • Grow by focusing on global market leaders
Achieve #1 or #2 Position in each Market Identified as Being of strategic Importance • Develop 5-year strategic business plan • Seek opportunities in other sectors of helicopter services • Make long-term strategic investment decisions
Maintain Industry-Leading Responsiveness • Provide consistent on-time delivery of service
Develop New Products/services/Technologies • Modernize fleet • Globalize SAR business • Innovate with new services and technologies
expand Grasso Production Management • Explore expansion alternatives
Target Zero workshops
Workshops for more than 450 Target Zero leaders around the company began April 23. Shown here is the workshop conducted at corporate headquarters in Houston. Participants are currently developing action plans to cascade to their staffs.
7Bristow World 2007 / Issue III
Move to global standards (continued from page 1)
Why global standards? Safer operations, enhanced value for global customers, better passenger experiences and greater efficiency are reasons Hopkins cites for creating global standards. “Cus- tomers want on-time flights and the highest level of safety and quality with consistency. Standardizing our approach will help us deliver that.”
Mark Fontenot, who heads the flight operations portion of Global Standards, emphasizes the safety benefits. “When you define the best way to do things and standardize, you have less room for quality fluctuations, and safety can improve.”
“In about 18 months I think we’ll be able to tell customers that we truly have global standards.” — Bill Hopkins
Grant Ireland, who leads the engineer- ing and maintenance component, forecasts that coordination of items such as aircraft certifications, base maintenance procedures and engineering practices will make it easier for both aircraft and personnel to move between countries and regions.
Andy Evans leads the quality and safety component, which includes the Target Zero initiative and standardization with Grasso Production Management. The whole team will also work closely with the new Global Training division led by Patrick Corr.
News Briefs
The 40th year of Bristow’s Aberdeen operations was featured in an Aberdeen Press & Journal article quoting John Clog- gie, director, European Operations. He described the company’s recent North Sea activities, including bringing in six EC225s, four EC55s and an S-92 to serve clients. “We’re investing because we see a long- lived market, though it may not be on the same scale as today,” he said.
The last Bell 214sT helicopter in the Aber- deen sector of the North Sea was retired in June after logging nearly two million miles of service. At the controls were Captains Dave Turner and Rick Balfour. Turner made his first trip offshore in the same aircraft 2 years ago. The helicopter will be shipped to the U.S. for spare parts.
Bristow continues to raise money to fund aircraft purchases. In June the company closed a private offering of $300 million of senior notes due 207. The notes carry an interest rate of 7½%.
Carlson Wagonlit has been named Bristow’s worldwide travel agency as part of our transi- tion to a global company. The change will help the company reduce travel expendi- tures, better negotiate with travel providers and improve the ability to contact employ- ees in emergencies. Carlson Wagonlit is the world’s second-largest travel management company and has locations in 5 coun- tries. The move to Carlson Wagonlit will be phased in later this year.
suldo, Corr named HAI leaders
Congratulations to Mike Suldo and Patrick Corr, named chairman and vice chairman, respectively, of the Helicopter Association International (HAI).
Suldo, Air Logistics president and Bristow senior vice president, Western Hemisphere, is former vice chairman and treasurer of HAI. He began his flying career in the U.S. Navy and flew 750 combat missions in Vietnam. He joined Air Logistics in 2002. Corr leads Bristow Academy and is senior vice president of
Bristow Global Training. Corr has been active in HAI for 8 years, and has served on the board of directors and as treasurer.
On May 30, Air Logistics in New Iberia hosted its first Client Safety Day to encourage greater safety communication with customers.
Safety and operational employees representing customers who have more than 70 helicopters on monthly contracts attended the event. Each customer representative was invited to voice specific areas of interest to be addressed.
Activities included briefings on Target Zero, Safety Management Systems, the Focus program, training, maintenance and operations.
Air Logistics hosts client safety event
In addition to discussions on safety topics and a facil- ity tour, customers were given an opportunity to fly the Air Logistics’ Bell 206 simulator.
Fantastic Voyage
The first of six new S-92 helicopters was recently received from Sikorsky and is now being deployed for IAC (Integrated Aviation Consortium) operating out of Scatsta in Scotland. Joint venture affiliate Norsk Helikopter was a launch customer on the S-92 and began operating the 9-passenger heavy in 2005.
Mike Suldo
Patrick Corr
Click ’n’ Fly Navigate your way around the World Wide Web on the new Bristow mousepad, available soon at the online company store.
Weather Watch
Bristow personnel see more than their share of unusual weather. Medic Systems Para- medic and National Weather Observer Koby O’Neal captured this photo of a waterspout approaching a Mariner Energy production platform in the Gulf of Mexico. “In my 0 years offshore I have seen many water- spouts but never this close,” he says. The spout dissipated before making contact with the platform.
Bristow World 2007 / Issue III8
High Flyers
Bristow people are making connections and doing good deeds around the world. Example: Jose Maldonado, manager of the Bristow Academy Military Training Program (MTP), and a host of employees are helping to fund an orphanage in Peru. While work- ing on a DynCorp contract with the U.S. em- bassy in Peru last year, Jose discovered the destitute orphanage in the town of Pucallpa. MTP personnel and other employees caught Jose’s enthusiasm for helping the orphan- age and donated generously. Patrick Corr, who leads Bristow Academy, volunteered to match employee contributions. Dona- tions were used to repair the roof, purchase medicine and restore the bakery. Jose also found a sponsor for a baker to provide the children with fresh bread daily. With Jose’s encouragement, U.S. embassy employees and DynCorp employees are also contrib- uting to the project. … Andy Robinson,
a paint sprayer in the overhaul shop in Redhill, was part of the England Air Pistol Men’s team that took part in the annual InterShoot
competition held in Den Haag, The Neth- erlands. Andy has been shooting for 25 years and hopes to make the England team traveling to the Commonwealth Games in Delhi in 200.
Andy Robinson
editor: Stacie Fairchild [email protected] 73.267.7607
editorial Team Erica Baker – S. America Melissa Berry – S.E. Asia (Australia) Allan Blake – Eastern Hemisphere (Redhill) Robert Goebel – N. America (Alaska) Anisha Hopkinson – Bristow Academy Edie Hunt – Corporate (Houston) Clive Knowles – West Africa (Nigeria) Agnita Moore – N. America (Gulf of Mexico) Jeff Peabody – N. America (Alaska) Amla Ramnasibsingh – Caribbean Sandie Richardson – Other International (Redhill) Audrey Smith – Europe (Aberdeen) Joe Thompson – Grasso/Medic Systems
Submit your story idea to your local team member.
Bristow Group Inc. 2000 W Sam Houston Pkwy S Suite 700, Houston, TX 77042 t 73.267.7600 f 73.267.7620 www.bristowgroup.com
© 2007 Bristow Group Inc.
Recruiting brochure hits the streets
A new brochure is being used by Bristow around the world to recruit pi- lots, engineers, production personnel and more. Need copies? Contact your Human Resources representative.
story Ideas? Have an idea for a Bristow World article? We want to hear from you. Contact your local editorial team member or email Stacie Fairchild.
Moving Forward
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company that’s always going places. Join
the thousands of Bristow (NYSE:BRS) team
members providing safe and efficient services
to the oil and gas industry worldwide.
One Mission. One World. One Team.
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as well as search and rescue operations. Operates fleet
of 120 modern, mostly twin-engine large and medium
aircraft. Opportunities in established oil and gas regions
of Europe, West Africa, Southeast Asia and a growing
number of emerging countries.
Ph. +44 (0)1737 822353 • Fax +44 (0)1737 822694
Bristow on TV
Following a three-month, 35 percent gain in Bristow’s stock price, CEO Bill Chiles was interviewed on the influential CNBC-TV net- work. He described the company’s business and talked about expansion of the fleet.
Waterspouts are tornadoes that develop over water.