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Signs of Spring

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  • THE BACKYARD BOOK

    Samantha Gray

  • THE BACKYARD BOOKBy Samantha Gray

    Table of Contents-Black Raspberry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 5-Black Tupelo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-Blue Ice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-Blue Ray Blueberry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-Chestnut Oak. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 5-Common Sassafras. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 7-Dragon Lady. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 9-Eastern White Pine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1-Lowbush Blueberry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 2 5-Minuet Lilac. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 7-Prairifire Crabapple. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 9

    -Red Maple. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1-Red Sprite Holly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..3 5-Red Sunset Maple. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ..3 7- Starking Hardy Giant Pecan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9-Stuart Pecan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1-Tulip Poplar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3

  • 1

  • INTRODUCTION

    This book serves as an informal guide to my world in the spring; my father taught me how to identify the trees in our yard by their bark and their buds, so I have collected photographs of these identifying factors, as well as interesting (to me, at least!) facts about each plant. In addition, this book shows glimpses of the springtime nature around and in my backyard, located in Birdsboro, Pennsylvania. This little space in the middle of nowhere has quite a bit of charm to it; something that I had not entirely appreciated before I began photographing for this book.

    -Samantha Gray, Spring 2011

  • Black Raspberry; Rubus occidentalis

    5

  • It can be difficult to tell the difference between black raspberries and blackberries; however, blackberries are larger, smoother, and shinier than black raspberries are. 1

  • Black Tupelo; Nyssa sylvatica

    7

  • The Black Tupelo, or Black Gum, is sometimes associated with wet areas; its latin genus name, Nyssa, is the name for a Greek mythological water sprite. 2

  • Blue Ice Cypress; Cupressus arizonica

    9

  • The Blue Ice Cypress is commonly used as a Christmas Tree, despite the fact that its delicate branches can only support the weight of tinsel and Christmas lights. 3

  • Blue Ray Blueberry bush; Vaccinium corymbosum

    11

  • The Blue Ray Blueberry is unique in that it can grow best on sites where most other crops would fail; they are hardy in cold regions with difficult winters. 4,5

  • Chestnut Oak; Quercus prinus

    15

  • The Chestnut Oak is also called Rock Oak, Rock Chestnut Oak, or Mountain Oak. This is because it can be found in dry, rocky soils at the tops of hilly ridges. 6

  • Common Sassafras; Sassafras albidum

    17

  • The roots, leaves, twigs and fruit of the Common Sassafras have a spicy odor; the oil contained in these parts is used for a tea in medicines, perfumes, and more. Its wood is used chiefly for fuel and fence posts. 7

  • Dragon Lady Holly; Ilex x meserveae

    19

  • The Dragon Lady Holly is one of the most deer resistant hollies available because of its stiff, pointed spines, which arent exactly appetizing to deer. 8,9

  • Eastern White Pine; Pinus strobus

    21

  • The bark of the Eastern White pine is used as an astringent, while the wood has been used to produce white pine tar - an antiseptic, expectorant, and protective. 10

  • Lowbush blueberry; Vaccinium angustifolium

    25

  • The Algonquin Indians used an infusion of Lowbush Blueberry leaves to treat infants with colic and women after a miscarriage. In addition, an infusion of Lowbush Blueberry roots was used by Algonquin women to induce labor. 11

  • Minuet Lilac; Syringa x prestoniae Minuet

    27

  • If it is grown under ideal conditions, the Minuet Lilac can be expected to live for about 30 years. 12

  • Prairifire Crabapple; Malus Prairifire

    29

  • The Prairifire Crabapple was introduced by D. F. Dayton of the Department of Horticulture at the University of Illinois, Urbana in 1982; it is most notable for its foliage being completely disease resistant. 13

  • Red Maple; Acer rubrum

    31

  • The nations largest Red Maple lies in the Great Smokey Mountains Nation-al Park; it was declared the largest in 1997, and is 141 feet tall and just over 7 feet in diameter. 14

  • Red Sprite Holly; Ilex verticillata

    35

  • A man named P.A. Sicbaldi first discovered a Red Sprite Holly seedling in the wild of Hampden, Massachusetts in 1980. 15,16

  • Red Sunset Maple; Acer rubrum

    37

  • The sap of a Red Sunset Maple tree can be used to make sugar, but it is not as desireable to use as the appropriately-named Sugar Maple. 17

  • Starking Hardy Giant Pecan; Carya illinoinesnsis

    39

  • The Starking Hardy Giant resulted from a campaign started in 1938 by a man named George James to find the best pecan for the central Missouri district. 18

  • Stuart Pecan; Carya illinoensis

    41

  • The Stuart Pecan tree was originally discovered by Colonel Stuart in Mississippi, growing on a fence row, and as a result Stuart was recognized as the father of modern pecan orchards. 19

  • Tulip Poplar; Liriodendron tulipifera

    43

  • Thomas Jefferson nicknamed the Tulip Poplar The Juno of our Groves when he sent a packet of the Tulip Poplars seeds to his friend in 1805. 20

  • SOURCES1. Differece Betweenhttp://www.differencebetween.net/object/comparisons-of-food-items/difference-between-blackberry-and-black-raspberry/

    2. About Forestryhttp://forestry.about.com/library/tree/blbltup.htm

    3. Super Glossaryhttp://www.superglossary.com/Definition/Christmas_Trees/Blue_Ice_Cypress.html

    4. Nature Hillshttp://www.naturehills.com/product/blueray_blueberry.aspx

    5. American Meadowshttp://www.americanmeadows.com/blueberry-blue-ray

    6. ODNR Division of Forestryhttp://www.dnr.state.oh.us/Home/trees/oak_chestnut/tabid/5391/Default.aspx

    7. Cook Foresthttp://www.cookforest.com/articles/trees/Common-Sassafra