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Basic Filters: Basic Concepts. Filtering is an important computation process in Geophysics that can be divided in two principal categories: Natural filtering. It is produced when an observation or record is deformed or affected by the media characteristics. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Basic Filters: Basic ConceptsFiltering is an important computation process in Geophysics that can be divided in two principal categories:

    Natural filtering. It is produced when an observation or record is deformed or affected by the media characteristics.

    Artificial filtering. It is produced by the observer when the observation or phenomena is recorded. In general, the record will be constituted a complex mixture of several components that will be necessary to separate (or filter), for a subsequent analysis.

  • Basic Filters: Basic DefinitionA filter operates converting an input signal x(t) to an output signal y(t):where h(t) is determined by the system properties. This general definition of a filter must be restricted to apply the spectral analysis, performed by the FFT. For it, the system given by h(t) must satisfy the fundamental properties listed below (bath, 1974).

  • Basic Filters: Fundamental PropertiesProperty of linearity. The differential equations of the system are linear equations. Thus, the system is a linear system:The system is stationary. The differential equations of the system have constant coefficients. Then, the system properties are time independent.

  • F(w) = input-signal spectrum ,, H(w) = filter-response spectrumG(w) = output-signal spectrum Basic Filters: Convolution FormulaWhen a filter satisfy the properties above mentioned, the output signal g(t) can be computed by the convolution formula (bath, 1974):amplitude spectrum phase spectrum

  • Basic Filters: DistortionsAmplitude-distorting filters. When the amplitude spectrum of a filter is not a constant, this filter produces distortions in the amplitude spectrum of the output signal (bath, 1974).

    Phase-distorting filters. When the phase spectrum of a filter is not zero, this filter produces distortions in the amplitude spectrum of the output signal. The output signal will be displaced on time respect to the input signal (bath, 1974).

    No-distorting filters. When the amplitude spectrum of a filter is a constant and the phase spectrum is zero, this filter doesnt produce distortions in the amplitude spectrum of the output signal (bath, 1974).

  • Basic Filters: Low-pass FilterWhen the amplitude spectrum of a filter is written as (bath, 1974):This filter is a low-pass filter. The effects of this kind of filter can be observed by using of the program SPECTRUM.

  • Basic Filters: High-pass FilterWhen the amplitude spectrum of a filter is written as (bath, 1974):This filter is a high-pass filter. The effects of this kind of filter can be observed by using of the program SPECTRUM.

  • Basic Filters: Band-pass FilterWhen the amplitude spectrum of a filter is written as (bath, 1974):This filter is a band-pass filter. The effects of this kind of filter can be observed by using of the program SPECTRUM.

  • Basic Filters: Instrumental ResponseThe problem arisen in the recording of a physical phenomena is well illustrated below. The instrument used to perform this record distorts the original true-signal x(t) given the output signal y(t). For this reason, a further process called deconvolution must be performed to recover the input signal x(t). Unfortunately, the input signal x(t) is never recovered completely. Thus, the signal recovered by the decondition filter is not exactly equal to x(t). Nevertheless, if the deconvolution process is well done, the recovered signal can be used instead of the original signal x(t), with a small error (Brigham, 1988).

  • Basic Filters: Instrumental ResponseThe distortions produced by the instrument give the output signal g(t). This perturbed signal g(t) is the convolution of the true signal f(t) and the system response h(t), written asWhen the true spectrum F(w) is computed from the output spectrum G(w) and the instrumental spectrum H(w), the original true-signal f(t) is recovered computing the FFT backward applied to the true spectrum F(w).

  • Basic Filters: Instrumental ResponseThe instrumental response or spectrum H(w) is always known for the instrument used in the recording of the input signal f(t). In the case of seismological instruments, the amplitude and phase of H(w) are plotted below for two typical seismographs.

  • Basic Filters: Instrumental ResponseThe instrumental response or spectrum H(w) will produce distortions on the amplitude and phase of the signal recorded. The figure presented below shows as the true amplitude and phase can be recovered, after the instrumental correction performed for the LP-WWSSN instrument.

  • Basic Filters: Instrumental ResponseThe instrumental response or spectrum H(w) will produce distortions on the amplitude and phase of the signal recorded. The figure presented below shows as the true amplitude and phase can be recovered, after the instrumental correction performed for the broad-band instrument.

  • Basic Filters: ReferencesBath M. (1974). Spectral Analysis in Geophysics. Elsevier, Amsterdam.

    Brigham E. O. (1988). The Fast Fourier Transform and Its Applications. Prentice Hall, New Jersey.Basic Filters: Web Pageshttp://airy.ual.es/www/series.htm

    http://airy.ual.es/www/spectrum.htm

    http://airy.ual.es/www/spectrum2D.htm