ben kunz mediassociates speech to boise ad federation

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Greetings -- I hope you enjoy this exploration of the history of human networks, how media can best use them, and the ethical conundrum we now face over how far to take personal minds in our marketing. For more information, ping me at 203 506 7269. Cheers. @benkunz

TRANSCRIPT

PowerPoint Presentation

How can you get more ROI from my $10MM budget?

How much does advertising cost?

Im Joe, a boxer in Alaska, and I have a great media idea for you.

$100,000

In 2007, we were approached by a boxer who offered to tattoo our brand or a client brand on his chest.7

It was tempting. Think of the splash. But should humans be treated this way?

My thesis for today is simple: Advertisers and marketers face a unique temptation in how we use human networks. And if were not careful, were going to do something dangerous.

SolarCityto IPO and 3x market share

CDCto digital and 2x awareness

Gulfstream to international digital lead gen

+400%+300%+200%+100%0%-100%Astrum Solar-61% in CPLBlack & Decker+4x in conversionsCessna Aircraft-28% in CPLGulfstream-51% in media costsCDC+124% over-deliveryHHS+290% impsSolarCity+300% market shareSNHU+400% revenue in 2 yearsVarian-77% in cost per responseBasically, we think of how to connect media to results

So who am I? A guy very interested in media.

In 2007 I started writing a marketing blog called ThoughtGadgets. It got noticed by Rachael King, a reporter for Businessweek, and I started writing columns there.

In December 2009, I got lucky reading patents and supplier news, I guessed Apple would launch a tablet and call it the iPad. Businessweek went with the story online and in print, and Steve Jobs announced it a few weeks later on Jan. 27, 2010.

My main interest is human networks, and how media is starting to use them.

Network

Net-work

Iron net-work

James Gleick recounts in his book The Information that when wires began being draped over the world, they freaked people out.

Gleick has a fascinating story. When Europeans arrived in the African Gambia River in the 1700s, they saw men and women carrying carved wooden drums, each making two tones. It was nice music. What they didnt realize was they were witnessing the fastest form of communication on Earth.

Gleick also has a fascinating story. When Europeans arrived in the Gambia River in the 1700s, they saw men and women carrying carved wooden drums, each making two tones. It was nice music. What they didnt realize was they were witnessing the fastest form of communication on Earth.

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alambaka boili

_ _ _

_ _ _ _

Many African languages are tonal languages, where the rising or falling pitch carries meaning. This Kele phrase means either he watched the riverbank or he boiled his mother in law. Two-toned drums can carry much of the meaning.

African languages were tonal languages, and rising or falling pitch changed the meeting. The Kele phrase above could mean eitherhe watched the riverbank orhe boiled his mother-in-law depending on the inflection. Two-toned drums could replicate the speech.

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For perhaps thousands of years, African culture blew away European society in the speed of communications. People could run

Pheidippides was the marathon man who died in September 490 B.C. He did more than run from Marathon to Athens -- in the week prior, he ran 147 miles in two days to share news of battle, then fought in the battle of Marathon, and then ran 26 miles to deliver news of victory. 173 miles total in a week.

Before this discovery, communications was hard, physical, slow.

Pheidippides was the marathon man who died in September 490 B.C. He did more than run from Marathon to Athens -- in the week prior, he ran 147 miles in two days to share news of battle, then fought in the battle of Marathon, and then ran 26 miles to deliver news of victory. 173 miles total in a week.

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By the 1790s, the French were building telegraph towers in visible lines north of Paris. One of the first station lines was 120 miles long.

Each tower had jointed arms that were pulled by ropes, and could take seven different angles and create 98 different visual signals. Across a network, only 2 of 3 messages arrived successfully in a day.

By the 1790s, the French were building telegraph towers in visible lines north of Paris. One of the first station lines was 120 miles long.

Each tower had jointed arms that were pulled by ropes, and could take seven different angles and create 98 different visual signals. Across a network, only 2 of 3 messages arrived successfully in a day.

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But the Africans had an information system that could travel from village to village, 7 miles down the river in each leg, up to 100 miles per hour, outpacing racing horses or running men. Detailed news of storms, fires, childbirth, fighting, and village life all fit into this system. Europeans didnt understand for hundreds of years.

But the Africans had an information system that could travel from village to village, 7 miles down the river in each leg, up to 100 miles per hour, outpacing racing horses or running men. Detailed news of storms, fires, childbirth, fighting, and village life all fit into this system. Europeans didnt understand for hundreds of years.

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Most networks are created before we know what to do with them.

fragmentsTHE CHALLENGE OF MEDIA

This is my office where I wrote most of this speech.

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It has seven different communication systems (not counting my camera, No. 8).

PhoneCellphoneVoicemail (work)Voicemail (cell)Text messagingFaxMailEmail (work)Email (Gmail)FacebookFacebook messagesTwitterTwitter direct messagesLinkedInInstagramVineSnapchatInstant messenger (Google)Instant messenger (Yahoo!)Whiteboard (office)WordExcelPowerPointKeynoteTableauPagesNumbersiPhotoScratch paperNotebooksCRM systemiMacDell localCompany serverGoogle DocsDesk foldersOffice safeGPS (TomTom)GPS (Google maps)

TVs (home) Radios (home)Radios (car)Stereo (work)Stereos (home)iPodiPhone appsTurntable PandoraSiriusBooksiPad 1iPad 2NetflixYouTubeHuluNewspaperWhiteboard (home)PostIts (kitchen counter)Bathroom mirror

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If a rocket scientist were teleported here from the 1950s, hed say:

WTF?

The CueCat is my favorite failed dongle. The idea was youd see a print ad, youd scan a code with this tethered to your computer, and it would boot up a website, where you could read more information.

Lena is another gadget that monitors how much you talk to a baby.

The device tethers to a computer, so dads and moms can track if they are speaking to children enough to spur intellectual development. Think of it as Nike+ for parents who want their children to get into Harvard.

iTunesAmazonNetflixGoogle search

Hardware.Media.Data.Advertising.

FacebookGoogleAppleAmazonPaperNetflixInstagramSkypeCreditsBankingMacsAppsiTunesiPadsNike+iWatchCloudKindleFireStar TrekPrimeFree ShippingG+HangoutsAndroidGlassYouTubeChromecastDocsAndroid TV

Hardware.Media.Data.Advertising.

FacebookGoogleAppleAmazonPaperNetflixInstagramSkypeCreditsBankingMacsAppsiTunesiPadsNike+iWatchCloudKindleFireStar TrekPrimeFree ShippingG+HangoutsAndroidGlassYouTubeChromecastDocsAndroid TV

And honestly,

human psychologykind of likes it.

In the 1960s, anthropologist Edward Hall and psychologist Robert Sommer discovered three distance fields in which humans take in communications. Intimate (18 inches), personal (18 inches to 4 feet), and social (4 to 12 feet).

Todays three major forms of gadgets fit perfectly into these distance fields. And because human needs different at each distance, gadgets will never converge. We cant combine the privacy of our intimate space with the entertainment of our social space. This is why you dont log on to your TV.

And more media gadgets are coming

Apple tends to signal major hardware upgrades with a pre-release of OS redesigns. The first releases of OSX 12 years ago had a plasticky window to match the white plastic Apple computers. The OS switched to metallic in 2002, and soon aluminum was used in most Apple computer hardware.

In November 2010, Apple patented a 3D screen system that would project holographic images to different viewers in the same room, without their wearing glasses. The system would also pick up ambient light so if you beamed yourself into a conference room screen on the other side of the country, the light from the window could cast a shadow on the other side of your face.48In 2013, Apple rebooted its mobile operating system, focused on parallax 3D type imagery with layers floating on layers.

In November 2010, Apple patented a 3D screen system that would project holographic images to different viewers in the same room, without their wearing glasses. The system would also pick up ambient light so if you beamed yourself into a conference room screen on the other side of the country, the light from the window could cast a shadow on the other side of your face.49

And theres this. In November 2010, Apple patented a 3D large screen system that would propel holographic images to different people in the room (without goggles). The sensors would also pick up ambient lighting, to cast realistic shadows on any image floating before the screen.

In November 2010, Apple patented a 3D screen system that would project holographic images to different viewers in the same room, without their wearing glasses. The system would also pick up ambient light so if you beamed yourself into a conference room screen on the other side of the country, the light from the window could cast a shadow on the other side of your face.50

Amazon is already there. An upcoming Amazon smartphone: Holographic interface, 6 cameras 1 back, 1 front, and 4 for gesture control?

Holographic scr