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Best Practices for Successful Community Collaborations: A Simulated Partner Experience Katherine Delgado, CIRS, CRS #AIRS2013

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#AIRS2013. Best Practices for Successful Community Collaborations: A Simulated Partner Experience. Katherine Delgado , CIRS, CRS. Objectives. Review similarities and differences between non-profits and private sector Review meaning of partnerships and collaborations - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Best Practices for Successful Community Collaborations:A Simulated Partner ExperienceKatherine Delgado, CIRS, CRS

#AIRS20131#AIRS2013ObjectivesReview similarities and differences between non-profits and private sector

Review meaning of partnerships and collaborations

Advantages of non-profits as community partners

The right climate for partnerships and collaborations

Overview of best practice resources for developing and sustaining partnerships and collaborations and an example of I&R partnership

Partner simulation to identify resources and partners within the community

How nonprofits are similar tothe private sectorWe have products and servicesWe have investorsWe have clientsWe need to keep them both happyWe need to produce revenue to stay in businessHow nonprofits are dissimilar tothe private sectorOur clients are often dependent on our products/servicesOur products and services are usually paid for by a third party, not the clientWe compete for investors, not customersOur investors demand are a lot more from us than ROI; we also have to be good stewards of invested dollarsRevenues often do not cover costs, let alone produce a profitHow Non-Profits Compare in a Bad EconomyPrivate SectorNonprofitsSales DeclineSales SpikeIncome DeclinesThere is no Direct Income from SalesProduction SlowsProduction IncreasesProduction Costs DeclineProduction Costs IncreaseInvestment Income DeclinesInvestment Income Declinescost-effective and

organizationally nimble enough to be

responsive to changing community needs.Well managed Nonprofits are:Partnerships and CollaborationsPartnershipCollaborationA relationship resembling a legal partnership and usually involving close cooperation between parties having specified and joint rights and responsibilities To work jointly with others, especially in an intellectual endeavor; to cooperate with an agency which one is not immediately connected

Nonprofits as PartnersNonprofits as partners can often offer major advantages:

Greater responsiveness to community needMore personalized and higher quality services, better outcomes for clientsPossibility of integrating web-based toolsCreative higher level placementsOrganizing around bigger goalsCommunity capacity building

Nonprofits are Highly Cost-Effective InvestmentsAt FCS, It CostsIt Costs the Taxpayer:$300 per month to keep one child out of state custody each month in our DCRCP program.$1,200 per month to keep a child in foster care and $3,000 for residential care.$15 per month per child for FRC and FACES programs to keep kids in school.$2,000 per month to house a youth in jail, not including police or court costs.$8 per call to the crisis center.$3,000-$8,000 per visit to the emergency room.Organizationally NimbleNon-profits can adapt and adopt proven programs and keep meeting needs while decreasing overhead and administrationThe Health Assist StoryFEC CentersResponsive to Changing Needs/DemandsWhere is FCS going:Crisis and Information ServicesHealth Navigation and the ACACommunity Based Programs

Focus looking out and looking deep to have immediate and long term goals our funders demand it, our clients deserve itIs the Organizational Climate Ready?Macroclimate vs. MicroclimateIs collaboration and partnership creation encouraged?Does the organization have enough people in place to manage roles?What is the current level of integration in the community?Is the goal to create a contact or enter a partnership or collaboration?What other capacity building initiatives have you developed?Have you begun to utilize web-based tools in ways that benefit other partners?Have you tapped into assessments and other rubrics?

Types of Partnerships/CollaborationsCollaboration: greater autonomy, no permanent organizational commitmentPartnership: sharing information, coordinating effortsStrategic Alliance: decision-making power is shared or transferredJoint programming: management of a program of mutual interest to participating organizations missionsIntegration: involves changes to structure and control

Education and TrainingCapacity BuildingResearch & Analysis Can be precursor used to narrow focus

Overview of Best PracticesGeneral Partnership Links (NSLC Links Collection) http://servicelearning.org/resources/links_collection/index.php?link_set_id=1&category_id=235

Civic Practices Network. The community section of this web site provides information on community building through "community organizing, social capital, and urban democracy." http://www.cpn.org/sections/topics/community/index.html.

The Engaged Community: Maximizing Community Impact (NSLC Fact Sheet)

Best Practices Community Partnerships, Corella & Bertram Bonner. Foundation http://www.slideshare.net/BonnerFoundation/best-practices-community-partnerships-1301755

Overview of Best PracticesThe Ten Principles of Partnership: The Foundation for the Community-Campus Partnership

National Service Knowledge NetworkCreating, running, and sustaining campus-community service-learning partnerships

Partnerships for Higher Education Service-Learning. (NSLC Fact Sheet) http://servicelearning.org/lib_svcs/bibs/cb_bibs/school_cmty/index.php

The Wisdom of Community-Campus Partnerships (NSLC PowerPoint) http://servicelearning.org/resources/online_documents/partnerships/cmty_campus/

Tools and Methods for Evaluating Service-Learning in Higher Education (NSLC Fact Sheet)

Community Partner: Service-Learning Toolkit (2008), Jenna Knapp (PDF)

Overview of Best PracticesFaculty Toolkit for Service-Learning in Higher Education (2007), Sarena D. Seifer and Kara Conners (PDF)

Strategies for Creating an Engaged Campus: An Advanced Service-Learning Toolkit for Academic Leaders (2001), Barbara Holland, Elizabeth Hollander, and Cathy Burack (PDF)

Looking In, Reaching Out: A Reflective Guide for Community Service-Learning Professionals (2010), Barbara Jacoby and Pamela Mutascio

Service-Learning Research Primer (2010), Kathryn S. Steinberg, Robert G. Bringle, and Matthew J. Williams (PDF)I&R Partnership ExampleService-Learning Partnership with Volunteer State Community CollegeStudents update I&R resources

Published on compaq.orghttp://www.compact.org/program-models/the-volunteer-state-community/22380/

Received 2013 Presidents Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll Award the highest federal educational recognition for service-learning and volunteerismI&R Partnership ExampleTwenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.Includes factors Related to:Environment Membership CharacteristicsProcess and StructureCommunicationPurposeResourcesAugustino-Wilke and Delgado, 2013

Table 1. Evidence of Twenty Influential Factors Supporting the Successful Collaboration between Volunteer State Community College and TN 2-1-1 Service-Learning Project.Augustino-Wilke and Delgado, 2013

Table 1. Evidence of Twenty Influential Factors Supporting the Successful Collaboration between Volunteer State Community College and TN 2-1-1 Service-Learning Project.Augustino-Wilke and Delgado, 2013

Table 1. Evidence of Twenty Influential Factors Supporting the Successful Collaboration between Volunteer State Community College and TN 2-1-1 Service-Learning Project.Augustino-Wilke and Delgado, 2013

Table 1. Evidence of Twenty Influential Factors Supporting the Successful Collaboration between Volunteer State Community College and TN 2-1-1 Service-Learning Project.Augustino-Wilke and Delgado, 2013

Table 1. Evidence of Twenty Influential Factors Supporting the Successful Collaboration between Volunteer State Community College and TN 2-1-1 Service-Learning Project.Augustino-Wilke and Delgado, 2013

Table 1. Evidence of Twenty Influential Factors Supporting the Successful Collaboration between Volunteer State Community College and TN 2-1-1 Service-Learning Project.Partner Simulation:Does the organization need a partner?How does the organization find a partner?Then what? Partnership Simulation Step 1:Determine whether your organization has unmet/underfunded needs and whether forming a partnership/collaboration to meet those needs would enhance organizational effectiveness

Partnership Simulation Step 2:Identify and research potential partnersResearch local agencies or schools; look for a good fitEmpower employees to look for partnership opportunities

Partnership Simulation Step 3:Understand your core values and those of your potential partner

Determine whether your organization has unmet/underfunded needs and whether forming a partnership/collaboration to meet those needs would enhance organizational effectiveness

Identify and research potential partners.Research local agencies or schools; look for a good fitEmpower employees to look for partnership opportunities

Understand your core values and those of your potential partner

Draft a partnership proposal

Submit your proposal to potential partner

Coordinate a follow-up meeting or callPartnership Simulation Partnership ScenarioHow might you improve the effectiveness of your organization based on this scenario?

Reflection& QuestionsThank You!Katherine Delgado, CIRS, CRS2-1-1 Call Center SupervisorFamily & Children's Service615.320.0591 ext [email protected]

#AIRS201320F Group Simuation HandoutTwenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment 1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the community2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the community3. A favorable political and social climate

Factors Related to Membership Characteristics4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizations5. An appropriate cross section of members6. Members see collaboration in their self-interest7. The ability to compromise

Factors Related to Process and Structure8. Members share a stake in process and outcome9. Multiple layers of participation10. Flexibility in both structure and methods11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelines12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changes13. An appropriate pace of development

Factors Related to Communication14. Open and frequent communication15. Established informal and formal communication links

Factors Related to Purpose16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attained17. Shared vision18. Unique purpose

Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and time20. Skilled leadership

Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet3Twenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment Evidence1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the communityVol State is known as a source of community leadership, as is Family & Children's Service, which has been in existence for 70 years and is part of the United Way umbrella of services . Once the idea of partnering to establish the project was in place and understood by both organizations, the "name recognition" allowed us a respectable place to begin.2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the communityThe project supervisor/faculty member had been implementing the project for 2 semesters prior to the formal partnership, thus the legitimacy of the project as well as the committment, reliability, and competency had been demonstrated at the time of initial collaboration. Too, the partners understood the academic institutions and community agencys overarching philosophy and mission of service-learning were aligned. *It helped having our Community Partner Preceptor as a VolState graduate.3. A favorable political and social climateNo opposition to partnering present, while overall general support for service-learning and building community partnerships was/is highly encouraged by the Office of Service-Learning. The project preceptor was also a "new" faculty member, thus the political and social climate seemed to be right for starting a collaborative project like this one.Factors Related to the Environment Evidence4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizationsWe elected to begin with trust and a willingness to accept that each side would need to be obliging to "make this work." Visits/meetings to respective sites further established a sense of responsibility to others (2-1-1 callers, volunteer counselors, and student needs).5. An appropriate cross section of membersInitially, we thought that all the people involved in our collaboration represented a cross section of those who have a stake. We later learned of the additionally necessary parties needed for support (Division Dean, Department Chair of Faculty Member). 6. Members see collaboration in their self-interestService-learning and career development opportunities for students; Cost savings to Family and Children's Service $210,375 and movement towards accreditation7. The ability to compromiseExamples include restricting agency updates to six main course components; adjusting student tasks based on individual student capacity; adjusted schedules based upon overlapping obligations; flexible call center daysFactors Related to Process & Structure Evidence8. Members share a stake in process and outcome"Ownership" felt from both parties; feel benefits for callers, students, and community; student learning objectives; increase in capacity of 211 service to provide accurate information to callers in need or a crisis situation; newly implemented listings provide access to resources desperatley needed9. Multiple layers of participationEvery level (upper/middle management, operations) within each partner organization has at least some representation and ongoing involvement in collaborative initiative; agency leadership and Service-Learning Director10. Flexibility in both structure and methodsUpdate focus evolved to meet curriculum needs; assessment and survey methods advanced11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelinesMOU12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changesThourough documentation and notes for each phase of project, survived faculty change13. An appropriate pace of developmentCall center added; consistent timelines, project implementation parrallels school semesterFactors Related to CommunicationEvidence14. Open and frequent communicationRegularly interact and provide updates; meet 2-3 times a week for 2-month duration during semester, provides ample time to reflect, plan, and discuss progress and challenges; phone, email, text15. Established informal and formal communication linksFormal planning meetings with 211 leadership team before each semester begins; structured call center times throughout semester; structured student "reviews" at end of each semester; regularly meet with Director of Service-Learning for guidance, feedback, and collaborationFactors Related to PurposeEvidence16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attainedPartnership Agreement; established and SMART goals17. Shared visionPartners share the credit for the partnerships accomplishment/s. Writing, co-led presentations/publications; both dedicated to vision and mssion18. Unique purposeThe people in this collaborative group are dedicated to the idea that we can make this project work. Rise up to help one another if project deadlines overlap with other interferring obligations Factors Related to ResourcesEvidence19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and timeOur collaborative group has adequate people power to do what it wants to accomplish; agency adds supplemental staff when needed; community member staff has sufficient time to participate in call center days throughout semester; agency provides new agency reports as needed and program materials to demonstrate agency mission20. Skilled leadershipStrong leadership skills; strong network of supportive leaders above project faculty, helps encourage sustainability for the furture and provide guidance and insight; conference attendance and scholarly research further promotes leadership development; project has been shared with other 211s and United Way Community Liasons

Sheet1Twenty Factors that Influence Successful CollaborationsFactors Related to the Environment Factors Related to Membership CharacteristicsFactors Related to Process and StructureFactors Related to CommunicationFactors Related to PurposeFactors Related to ResourcesMattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

20F Group Simuation HandoutTwenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment 1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the community2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the community3. A favorable political and social climate

Factors Related to Membership Characteristics4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizations5. An appropriate cross section of members6. Members see collaboration in their self-interest7. The ability to compromise

Factors Related to Process and Structure8. Members share a stake in process and outcome9. Multiple layers of participation10. Flexibility in both structure and methods11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelines12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changes13. An appropriate pace of development

Factors Related to Communication14. Open and frequent communication15. Established informal and formal communication links

Factors Related to Purpose16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attained17. Shared vision18. Unique purpose

Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and time20. Skilled leadership

Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet3Twenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment Evidence1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the communityVolstate known as a source of community leadership as is Family & Children's Service, especially as it has been in existence for 70 years, and is also part of the United Way umbrella of services . Once the idea of partnering to establish the project was in place and understood by both organizations, the "name recognition" allowed us a respectable place to begin.2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the communityThe project supervisor/faculty member, had been implementing the project for 2 semesters prior to the formal partnership, thus the legitimacy of the project as well as the committment, reliability, and competency had been demonstrated at the time of initial collaboration. Too, the partners understood the academic institutions and community agencys overarching philosophy and mission of service-learning were aligned. *It helped having our Community Partner Preceptor as a VolState graduate.3. A favorable political and social climateNo opposition to partnering present while overall general support for service-learning and building community partnerships was/is highly encouraged by the Office of Service-Learning, Volunteerism and Cooperative Education. The project preceptor was also a "new" faculty member, thus the political and social climate seemed to be right for starting a collaborative project like this one.Factors Related to the Membership Charachteristics Evidence4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizationsWe elected to begin with trust and a willingness to accept that each side would need to be engaged to "make this work." Visits/meetings to respective sites further established a sense of responsibility to others (2-1-1 callers, volunteer counselors, and student needs).5. An appropriate cross section of membersInitially, we thought that all the people involved in our collaboration represented a cross section of those who have a stake. We later learned of the additionally necessary parties needed for support (Division Dean, Department Chair of Faculty Member). 6. Members see collaboration in their self-interestService-learning and career development opportunities for students; cost savings to Family & Children's Service ($210,375) and movement towards accreditation7. The ability to compromiseExamples include restricting agency updates to six main course components; adjusting student tasks based on individual student capacity; adjusted schedules based upon overlapping obligations; flexible call center daysFactors Related to Process and StructureMany institutions assume that their community partners hold limited power and that its necessary for the institutions to build them up. However, this is not always the case. Power dynamics must be carefully assessed and then, if necessary, methods of power redistribution should be considered. Once a more equitable balance of power is in place, resources can be more effectively shared. Partners should also be creative as to how resources are defined. Resources are not just financial, but can also include people, supplies, space, or knowledge. Appreciation and energy can also be seen as resources that can be and should be shared and celebrated by partners.8. Members share a stake in process and outcomefeel "ownership" from both parties; feel benefits for callers, students, and community; student learning objectives; increase capacity of 211 service to provide accurate information to callers in need or a crisis situation; newly implemented listings provide access to resources desperatley neededSome of the common problems that can occur in service-learning can be proactively addressed by involving community partners in curriculum design.9. Multiple layers of participationEvery level (upper management, middle management, operations) within each partner organization has at least some representation and ongoing involvement in the collaborative initiative; agency leadership and service-learning director (Risk's office), 10. Flexibility in both structure and methodsCurriculum changed to meet class needs; Establish an agenda with special focus on the development of goals, objectives, and strategies. General brainstorming using creative free flow techniques will help generate ideas about the partnerships goals, objectives, and strategies. This approach fosters inclusion and a respect for diverse ideas and opinions during the planning process.11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelinesMOU12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changesdocumentation, notes, survived faculty change13. An appropriate pace of developmentcall center added; one-on-one time addedEffective partnerships must have the capacity and patience to consider and embrace change as they develop. Partnerships can be viewed as living organisms that must be nurtured over time. Not all partnerships do or are meant to last forever. This needs to be acknowledged and anticipated.Factors Related to Communication14. Open and frequent communicationregularly interact and provide updatesIn this high-tech era, there are many different gadgets and tools to foster and deliver communication. The trick is finding the best communication method for the partnership. What methods of communication will the partnership committee rely upon, and how often will the committee communicate with one another? These questions are vital; keeping one another informed of progress, challenges, and requests will steer the level of momentum achieved by the committee. If committee members decide to use electronic communication, it will be important that each member has electronic access.15. Established informal and formal communication linksformal meetings, email, texts; openly and regularlyImplement strategies that foster ongoing input and feedback among the partners. It is critical to maintain ongoing effective feedback and input from your service-learning partners and students. Open communication and follow-up to suggestions are key to sustaining service-learning partnerships.Factors Related to Purpose16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attainedPartnership Agreement; established and reasonable17. Shared visionPartners share the credit for the partnerships accomplishment/s. Writing, co-led presentations/publications; both dedicated to mssion18. Unique purposeThe people in this collaborativegroup are dedicated to the idea thatwe can make this project work. Rise up to help one another if project deadlines overlap with other interferring obligations Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and timeOur collaborative group has adequate people power to do what it wants to accomplish. Adds staff when needed. Community member staff has sufficient time to participate.Have you considered asking your community partners for readings, articles and reports that address the issues in your course? Community partners may also have access to their favorite poems, short stories, or monographs that may heighten awareness among students concerning the issues or topic being addressed in the service-learning course.20. Skilled leadershipStrong leadership skills; strong network of supportive leaders above project faculty; conference attendance, scholarly researchIs there a plan in place to prepare for turnover among key partners and staff? One way to avoid challenges related to turnover is to build a strong network of supporters and leaders. Your supporters may be involved in the day-to-day activities of the service-learning course, or may simply be advisers who offer insight and ideas. By fostering this network, the partnership has been infused with a greater number of potential future leaders and champions! Broaden the circle of supporters to include both internal and external leaders such as political, institutional, neighborhood, business, faculty and student leaders. Develop the leadership skills of all stakeholders. Leadership skills can be developed and supported by creating a professional development plan, subscribing to relevant journals and electronic listservs, attending conferences and other networking events.Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet1Twenty Factors that Influence Successful CollaborationsFactors Related to the Environment Factors Related to Membership CharacteristicsFactors Related to Process and StructureFactors Related to CommunicationFactors Related to PurposeFactors Related to ResourcesMattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

20F Group Simuation HandoutTwenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment 1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the community2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the community3. A favorable political and social climate

Factors Related to Membership Characteristics4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizations5. An appropriate cross section of members6. Members see collaboration in their self-interest7. The ability to compromise

Factors Related to Process and Structure8. Members share a stake in process and outcome9. Multiple layers of participation10. Flexibility in both structure and methods11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelines12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changes13. An appropriate pace of development

Factors Related to Communication14. Open and frequent communication15. Established informal and formal communication links

Factors Related to Purpose16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attained17. Shared vision18. Unique purpose

Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and time20. Skilled leadership

Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet3Twenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment Evidence1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the communityVolstate known as a source of community leadership as is Family & Children's Service, especially as it has been in existence for 70 years, and is also part of the United Way umbrella of services . Once the idea of partnering to establish the project was in place and understood by both organizations, the "name recognition" allowed us a respectable place to begin.2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the communityThe project supervisor/faculty member, had been implementing the project for 2 semesters prior to the formal partnership, thus the legitimacy of the project as well as the committment, reliability, and competency had been demonstrated at the time of initial collaboration. Too, the partners understood the academic institutions and community agencys overarching philosophy and mission of service-learning were aligned. *It helped having our Community Partner Preceptor as a VolState graduate.3. A favorable political and social climateNo opposition to partnering present while overall general support for service-learning and building community partnerships was/is highly encouraged by the Office of Service-Learning, Volunteerism and Cooperative Education. The project preceptor was also a "new" faculty member, thus the political and social climate seemed to be right for starting a collaborative project like this one.Factors Related to the Environment Evidence4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizationsWe elected to begin with trust and a willingness to accept that each side would need to be obliging to "make this work." Visits/meetings to respective sites further established a sense of responsibility to others (2-1-1 callers, volunteer counselors, and student needs).5. An appropriate cross section of membersInitially, we thought that all the people involved in our collaboration represented a cross section of those who have a stake. We later learned of the additionally necessary parties needed for support (Division Dean, Department Chair of Faculty Member). 6. Members see collaboration in their self-interestService-learning and career development opportunities for students; Cost savings to Family and Children's Service $210,375 and movement towards accreditation7. The ability to compromiseExamples include restricting agency updates to six main course components; adjusting student tasks based on individual student capacity; adjusted schedules based upon overlapping obligations; flexible call center daysFactors Related to Process & Structure Evidence8. Members share a stake in process and outcome"Ownership" felt from both parties; feel benefits for callers, students, and community; student learning objectives; increase in capacity of 211 service to provide accurate information to callers in need or a crisis situation; newly- implemented listings provide access to resources desperately needed9. Multiple layers of participationEvery level (upper/middle management, operations) within each partner organization has at least some representation and ongoing involvement in collaborative initiative; agency leadership and Service-Learning Director10. Flexibility in both structure and methodsUpdate focus evolved to meet curriculum needs; assessment and survey methods advanced11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelinesMOU12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changesThorough documentation and notes for each phase of project, weathered faculty change13. An appropriate pace of developmentCall center added; consistent timelines, project implementation parrallels school semesterFactors Related to Communication14. Open and frequent communicationregularly interact and provide updatesIn this high-tech era, there are many different gadgets and tools to foster and deliver communication. The trick is finding the best communication method for the partnership. What methods of communication will the partnership committee rely upon, and how often will the committee communicate with one another? These questions are vital; keeping one another informed of progress, challenges, and requests will steer the level of momentum achieved by the committee. If committee members decide to use electronic communication, it will be important that each member has electronic access.15. Established informal and formal communication linksformal meetings, email, texts; openly and regularlyImplement strategies that foster ongoing input and feedback among the partners. It is critical to maintain ongoing effective feedback and input from your service-learning partners and students. Open communication and follow-up to suggestions are key to sustaining service-learning partnerships.Factors Related to Purpose16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attainedPartnership Agreement; established and reasonable17. Shared visionPartners share the credit for the partnerships accomplishment/s. Writing, co-led presentations/publications; both dedicated to mssion18. Unique purposeThe people in this collaborativegroup are dedicated to the idea thatwe can make this project work. Rise up to help one another if project deadlines overlap with other interferring obligations Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and timeOur collaborative group has adequate people power to do what it wants to accomplish. Adds staff when needed. Community member staff has sufficient time to participate.Have you considered asking your community partners for readings, articles and reports that address the issues in your course? Community partners may also have access to their favorite poems, short stories, or monographs that may heighten awareness among students concerning the issues or topic being addressed in the service-learning course.20. Skilled leadershipStrong leadership skills; strong network of supportive leaders above project faculty; conference attendance, scholarly researchIs there a plan in place to prepare for turnover among key partners and staff? One way to avoid challenges related to turnover is to build a strong network of supporters and leaders. Your supporters may be involved in the day-to-day activities of the service-learning course, or may simply be advisers who offer insight and ideas. By fostering this network, the partnership has been infused with a greater number of potential future leaders and champions! Broaden the circle of supporters to include both internal and external leaders such as political, institutional, neighborhood, business, faculty and student leaders. Develop the leadership skills of all stakeholders. Leadership skills can be developed and supported by creating a professional development plan, subscribing to relevant journals and electronic listservs, attending conferences and other networking events.Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet1Twenty Factors that Influence Successful CollaborationsFactors Related to the Environment Factors Related to Membership CharacteristicsFactors Related to Process and StructureFactors Related to CommunicationFactors Related to PurposeFactors Related to ResourcesMattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

20F Group Simuation HandoutTwenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment 1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the community2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the community3. A favorable political and social climate

Factors Related to Membership Characteristics4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizations5. An appropriate cross section of members6. Members see collaboration in their self-interest7. The ability to compromise

Factors Related to Process and Structure8. Members share a stake in process and outcome9. Multiple layers of participation10. Flexibility in both structure and methods11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelines12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changes13. An appropriate pace of development

Factors Related to Communication14. Open and frequent communication15. Established informal and formal communication links

Factors Related to Purpose16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attained17. Shared vision18. Unique purpose

Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and time20. Skilled leadership

Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet3Twenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment Evidence1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the communityVolstate known as a source of community leadership as is Family & Children's Service, especially as it has been in existence for 70 years, and is also part of the United Way umbrella of services . Once the idea of partnering to establish the project was in place and understood by both organizations, the "name recognition" allowed us a respectable place to begin.2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the communityThe project supervisor/faculty member, had been implementing the project for 2 semesters prior to the formal partnership, thus the legitimacy of the project as well as the committment, reliability, and competency had been demonstrated at the time of initial collaboration. Too, the partners understood the academic institutions and community agencys overarching philosophy and mission of service-learning were aligned. *It helped having our Community Partner Preceptor as a VolState graduate.3. A favorable political and social climateNo opposition to partnering present while overall general support for service-learning and building community partnerships was/is highly encouraged by the Office of Service-Learning, Volunteerism and Cooperative Education. The project preceptor was also a "new" faculty member, thus the political and social climate seemed to be right for starting a collaborative project like this one.Factors Related to the Environment Evidence4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizationsWe elected to begin with trust and a willingness to accept that each side would need to be obliging to "make this work." Visits/meetings to respective sites further established a sense of responsibility to others (2-1-1 callers, volunteer counselors, and student needs).5. An appropriate cross section of membersInitially, we thought that all the people involved in our collaboration represented a cross section of those who have a stake. We later learned of the additionally necessary parties needed for support (Division Dean, Department Chair of Faculty Member). 6. Members see collaboration in their self-interestService-learning and career development opportunities for students; Cost savings to Family and Children's Service $210,375 and movement towards accreditation7. The ability to compromiseExamples include restricting agency updates to six main course components; adjusting student tasks based on individual student capacity; adjusted schedules based upon overlapping obligations; flexible call center daysFactors Related to Process & Structure Evidence8. Members share a stake in process and outcome"Ownership" felt from both parties; feel benefits for callers, students, and community; student learning objectives; increase in capacity of 211 service to provide accurate information to callers in need or a crisis situation; newly implemented listings provide access to resources desperatley needed9. Multiple layers of participationEvery level (upper/middle management, operations) within each partner organization has at least some representation and ongoing involvement in collaborative initiative; agency leadership and Service-Learning Director10. Flexibility in both structure and methodsUpdate focus evolved to meet curriculum needs; assessment and survey methods advanced11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelinesMOU12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changesThourough documentation and notes for each phase of project, survived faculty change13. An appropriate pace of developmentCall center added; consistent timelines, project implementation parrallels school semesterFactors Related to CommunicationEvidence14. Open and frequent communicationRegularly interact and provide updates; meet 2-3 times a week for 2-month duration during semester, provide ample time to reflect, plan, and discuss progress and challenges; phone, email, text15. Established informal and formal communication linksFormal planning meetings with 211 leadership team before each semester began; structured call center times throughout semester; structured student "reviews" at end of each semester; regularly meet with Director of Service-Learning for guidance, feedback, and collaboration

Factors Related to Purpose16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attainedPartnership Agreement; established and reasonable17. Shared visionPartners share the credit for the partnerships accomplishment/s. Writing, co-led presentations/publications; both dedicated to mssion18. Unique purposeThe people in this collaborativegroup are dedicated to the idea thatwe can make this project work. Rise up to help one another if project deadlines overlap with other interferring obligations Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and timeOur collaborative group has adequate people power to do what it wants to accomplish. Adds staff when needed. Community member staff has sufficient time to participate.Have you considered asking your community partners for readings, articles and reports that address the issues in your course? Community partners may also have access to their favorite poems, short stories, or monographs that may heighten awareness among students concerning the issues or topic being addressed in the service-learning course.20. Skilled leadershipStrong leadership skills; strong network of supportive leaders above project faculty; conference attendance, scholarly researchIs there a plan in place to prepare for turnover among key partners and staff? One way to avoid challenges related to turnover is to build a strong network of supporters and leaders. Your supporters may be involved in the day-to-day activities of the service-learning course, or may simply be advisers who offer insight and ideas. By fostering this network, the partnership has been infused with a greater number of potential future leaders and champions! Broaden the circle of supporters to include both internal and external leaders such as political, institutional, neighborhood, business, faculty and student leaders. Develop the leadership skills of all stakeholders. Leadership skills can be developed and supported by creating a professional development plan, subscribing to relevant journals and electronic listservs, attending conferences and other networking events.Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet1Twenty Factors that Influence Successful CollaborationsFactors Related to the Environment Factors Related to Membership CharacteristicsFactors Related to Process and StructureFactors Related to CommunicationFactors Related to PurposeFactors Related to ResourcesMattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

20F Group Simuation HandoutTwenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment 1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the community2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the community3. A favorable political and social climate

Factors Related to Membership Characteristics4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizations5. An appropriate cross section of members6. Members see collaboration in their self-interest7. The ability to compromise

Factors Related to Process and Structure8. Members share a stake in process and outcome9. Multiple layers of participation10. Flexibility in both structure and methods11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelines12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changes13. An appropriate pace of development

Factors Related to Communication14. Open and frequent communication15. Established informal and formal communication links

Factors Related to Purpose16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attained17. Shared vision18. Unique purpose

Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and time20. Skilled leadership

Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet3Twenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment Evidence1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the communityVolstate known as a source of community leadership as is Family & Children's Service, especially as it has been in existence for 70 years, and is also part of the United Way umbrella of services . Once the idea of partnering to establish the project was in place and understood by both organizations, the "name recognition" allowed us a respectable place to begin.2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the communityThe project supervisor/faculty member, had been implementing the project for 2 semesters prior to the formal partnership, thus the legitimacy of the project as well as the committment, reliability, and competency had been demonstrated at the time of initial collaboration. Too, the partners understood the academic institutions and community agencys overarching philosophy and mission of service-learning were aligned. *It helped having our Community Partner Preceptor as a VolState graduate.3. A favorable political and social climateNo opposition to partnering present while overall general support for service-learning and building community partnerships was/is highly encouraged by the Office of Service-Learning, Volunteerism and Cooperative Education. The project preceptor was also a "new" faculty member, thus the political and social climate seemed to be right for starting a collaborative project like this one.Factors Related to the Environment Evidence4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizationsWe elected to begin with trust and a willingness to accept that each side would need to be obliging to "make this work." Visits/meetings to respective sites further established a sense of responsibility to others (2-1-1 callers, volunteer counselors, and student needs).5. An appropriate cross section of membersInitially, we thought that all the people involved in our collaboration represented a cross section of those who have a stake. We later learned of the additionally necessary parties needed for support (Division Dean, Department Chair of Faculty Member). 6. Members see collaboration in their self-interestService-learning and career development opportunities for students; Cost savings to Family and Children's Service $210,375 and movement towards accreditation7. The ability to compromiseExamples include restricting agency updates to six main course components; adjusting student tasks based on individual student capacity; adjusted schedules based upon overlapping obligations; flexible call center daysFactors Related to Process & Structure Evidence8. Members share a stake in process and outcome"Ownership" felt from both parties; feel benefits for callers, students, and community; student learning objectives; increase in capacity of 211 service to provide accurate information to callers in need or a crisis situation; newly implemented listings provide access to resources desperatley needed9. Multiple layers of participationEvery level (upper/middle management, operations) within each partner organization has at least some representation and ongoing involvement in collaborative initiative; agency leadership and Service-Learning Director10. Flexibility in both structure and methodsUpdate focus evolved to meet curriculum needs; assessment and survey methods advanced11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelinesMOU12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changesThourough documentation and notes for each phase of project, survived faculty change13. An appropriate pace of developmentCall center added; consistent timelines, project implementation parrallels school semesterFactors Related to CommunicationEvidence14. Open and frequent communicationRegularly interact and provide updates; meet 2-3 times a week for 2-month duration during semester, provides ample time to reflect, plan, and discuss progress and challenges; phone, email, text15. Established informal and formal communication linksFormal planning meetings with 211 leadership team before each semester begins; structured call center times throughout semester; structured student "reviews" at end of each semester; regularly meet with Director of Service-Learning for guidance, feedback, and collaborationFactors Related to PurposeEvidence16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attainedPartnership Agreement; established and SMART goals; student instruction packets17. Shared visionPartners share the credit for the partnerships accomplishment(s); writing, co-led presentations/publications; both dedicated to vision and mssion18. Unique purposeThe people in this collaborative group are dedicated to the idea that we can make this project work; rise up to help one another if project deadlines overlap with other interfering obligations Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and timeOur collaborative group has adequate people power to do what it wants to accomplish. Adds staff when needed. Community member staff has sufficient time to participate.Have you considered asking your community partners for readings, articles and reports that address the issues in your course? Community partners may also have access to their favorite poems, short stories, or monographs that may heighten awareness among students concerning the issues or topic being addressed in the service-learning course.20. Skilled leadershipStrong leadership skills; strong network of supportive leaders above project faculty; conference attendance, scholarly researchIs there a plan in place to prepare for turnover among key partners and staff? One way to avoid challenges related to turnover is to build a strong network of supporters and leaders. Your supporters may be involved in the day-to-day activities of the service-learning course, or may simply be advisers who offer insight and ideas. By fostering this network, the partnership has been infused with a greater number of potential future leaders and champions! Broaden the circle of supporters to include both internal and external leaders such as political, institutional, neighborhood, business, faculty and student leaders. Develop the leadership skills of all stakeholders. Leadership skills can be developed and supported by creating a professional development plan, subscribing to relevant journals and electronic listservs, attending conferences and other networking events.Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet1Twenty Factors that Influence Successful CollaborationsFactors Related to the Environment Factors Related to Membership CharacteristicsFactors Related to Process and StructureFactors Related to CommunicationFactors Related to PurposeFactors Related to ResourcesMattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

20F Group Simuation HandoutTwenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment 1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the community2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the community3. A favorable political and social climate

Factors Related to Membership Characteristics4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizations5. An appropriate cross section of members6. Members see collaboration in their self-interest7. The ability to compromise

Factors Related to Process and Structure8. Members share a stake in process and outcome9. Multiple layers of participation10. Flexibility in both structure and methods11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelines12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changes13. An appropriate pace of development

Factors Related to Communication14. Open and frequent communication15. Established informal and formal communication links

Factors Related to Purpose16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attained17. Shared vision18. Unique purpose

Factors Related to Resources19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and time20. Skilled leadership

Mattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.

Sheet3Twenty Factors that Influence Successful Collaborations

Factors Related to the Environment Evidence1. A history of collaboration or cooperation in the communityVolstate known as a source of community leadership as is Family & Children's Service, especially as it has been in existence for 70 years, and is also part of the United Way umbrella of services . Once the idea of partnering to establish the project was in place and understood by both organizations, the "name recognition" allowed us a respectable place to begin.2. The collaborative group is seen as a legitimate leader in the communityThe project supervisor/faculty member, had been implementing the project for 2 semesters prior to the formal partnership, thus the legitimacy of the project as well as the committment, reliability, and competency had been demonstrated at the time of initial collaboration. Too, the partners understood the academic institutions and community agencys overarching philosophy and mission of service-learning were aligned. *It helped having our Community Partner Preceptor as a VolState graduate.3. A favorable political and social climateNo opposition to partnering present while overall general support for service-learning and building community partnerships was/is highly encouraged by the Office of Service-Learning, Volunteerism and Cooperative Education. The project preceptor was also a "new" faculty member, thus the political and social climate seemed to be right for starting a collaborative project like this one.Factors Related to the Environment Evidence4. Mutual respect, understanding, and trust for members and their respective organizationsWe elected to begin with trust and a willingness to accept that each side would need to be obliging to "make this work." Visits/meetings to respective sites further established a sense of responsibility to others (2-1-1 callers, volunteer counselors, and student needs).5. An appropriate cross section of membersInitially, we thought that all the people involved in our collaboration represented a cross section of those who have a stake. We later learned of the additionally necessary parties needed for support (Division Dean, Department Chair of Faculty Member). 6. Members see collaboration in their self-interestService-learning and career development opportunities for students; Cost savings to Family and Children's Service $210,375 and movement towards accreditation7. The ability to compromiseExamples include restricting agency updates to six main course components; adjusting student tasks based on individual student capacity; adjusted schedules based upon overlapping obligations; flexible call center daysFactors Related to Process & Structure Evidence8. Members share a stake in process and outcome"Ownership" felt from both parties; feel benefits for callers, students, and community; student learning objectives; increase in capacity of 211 service to provide accurate information to callers in need or a crisis situation; newly implemented listings provide access to resources desperatley needed9. Multiple layers of participationEvery level (upper/middle management, operations) within each partner organization has at least some representation and ongoing involvement in collaborative initiative; agency leadership and Service-Learning Director10. Flexibility in both structure and methodsUpdate focus evolved to meet curriculum needs; assessment and survey methods advanced11. Development of clear roles and policy guidelinesMOU12. Adaptability or the ability of the collaborative group to sustain itself in the midst of changesThourough documentation and notes for each phase of project, survived faculty change13. An appropriate pace of developmentCall center added; consistent timelines, project implementation parrallels school semesterFactors Related to CommunicationEvidence14. Open and frequent communicationRegularly interact and provide updates; meet 2-3 times a week for 2-month duration during semester, provides ample time to reflect, plan, and discuss progress and challenges; phone, email, text15. Established informal and formal communication linksFormal planning meetings with 211 leadership team before each semester begins; structured call center times throughout semester; structured student "reviews" at end of each semester; regularly meet with Director of Service-Learning for guidance, feedback, and collaborationFactors Related to PurposeEvidence16. Clear attainable goals and objectives that are communicated to all partners and can be realistically attainedPartnership Agreement; established and SMART goals17. Shared visionPartners share the credit for the partnerships accomplishment/s. Writing, co-led presentations/publications; both dedicated to vision and mssion18. Unique purposeThe people in this collaborative group are dedicated to the idea that we can make this project work. Rise up to help one another if project deadlines overlap with other interferring obligations Factors Related to ResourcesEvidence19. Sufficient funds, staff, materials, and timeOur collaborative group has adequate people power to do what it wants to accomplish; agency adds supplemental staff when needed; community member staff has sufficient time to participate in call center days throughout semester; agency provides new agency reports as needed and program materials to demonstrate agency mission20. Skilled leadershipStrong leadership skills; strong network of supportive leaders above project faculty, helps encourage sustainability for the future and provide guidance and insight; conference attendance and scholarly research further promotes leadership development; project has been shared with other 211s and United Way Community Liaisons

Sheet1Twenty Factors that Influence Successful CollaborationsFactors Related to the Environment Factors Related to Membership CharacteristicsFactors Related to Process and StructureFactors Related to CommunicationFactors Related to PurposeFactors Related to ResourcesMattessich, Paul W. et al. Collaboration: What Makes it Work (Second Edition), St. Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2001.