beyond superpoke: using social networks to build client trust

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  • 1. Beyond SuperPoke: Using Social Networks to Build Client Trust 2008 Avenue A | Razorfish. All rights reserved.
  • 2. todays presentation
    • briefly context about the task at hand
    • introduction to tools / services: our experience using these tools for client work
    • an assessment of the Results was it better? whats next?
  • 3. why do we need trust? trust communication
  • 4. about the project
    • Big. Political. Distributed. Complex. Risky. Slow. Fast. Looong. Siloed.
  • 5. what did we create?
    • we created conversation with flow - despite the challenges
  • 6. new york to new jersey: knowledge in transit New York New Jersey
  • 7. time to read, yet how do I share ?
  • 8. evolution of a social network
  • 9. evolution of a social network: aggregation was a key
  • 10. stowe boyd: the web of flow why twitter and friendfeed?
    • Tech community
    • I was using
    • Free. easy setup
  • 11. twitter status messages reading a blog broadcast posting tinyurl to my blog conversation - @replies @reply I read your tinyurl and I disagree realtime conversation - track track [some character string] receive realtime SMS or instant message
  • 12. twitter status messages reading a blog broadcast posting tinyurl to my blog conversation - @replies @reply I read your tinyurl and I disagree realtime conversation - track track [some character string] receive realtime SMS or instant message
  • 13. friendfeed
    • sharing of content across services
    • individuals register their services
    • uses follow metaphor like twitter
    • an activity stream of new content posting is created amongst followers
    • users can comment on, like, or hide content
    • post out to twitter
    • open api
    • growing pains
    • noisy
    • disaggregation of comments away from original source
    • not mobile
  • 14. friendfeed: exploring solutions for noise
    • sharing of content across services
    • individuals register their services
    • uses follow metaphor like twitter
    • an activity stream of new content posting is created amongst followers
    • users can comment on, like, or hide content
    • post out to twitter
    • open api
    • growing pains
    • noisy
    • disaggregation of comments away from original source
    • not mobile
  • 15. we filled conversation white space mostly by accident Tool Open-ness High Tool Simplicity Low Low High Email Phone WWW: Project Site Wiki Analog Tweets Shared Bookmarks Blog LAN: Project Site IM Flickr Facebook
  • 16. a (social) network The Community Pyramid Don Dodge, Microsoft, Emerging Business Team Forrester from Groundswell http://www.forrester.com/Groundswell/profile_tool.html
  • 17. inner most ring role discovering , submitting and discussing content relevant to the project; submitting social objects
  • 18. middle layer role consuming inner ring content and contributing social objects
  • 19. outer ring role observers and observed
  • 20.
    • what was discussed?
  • 21. scott and rob discussed usability testing and mint
  • 22. a team open to experimentation helped us succeed
  • 23. chris gave the team something to talk about at lunch
  • 24. the team were among the first to congratulate rob
  • 25. nick drew on his old network and got outside help
  • 26. scott became an evangelist for twitter paul when does rob have time to work? scott that [twitter] is part of the work
  • 27. bill realized he needed to keep up Bill sometimes I feel like I have absolutely no idea what you guys are talking about. so I had to get on there [twitter] and find out. good luck on your next project and lets keep in touch. i promise i will post more stuff i have been a little pre-occupied lately.
  • 28.
    • when did the discussions occur?
  • 29. aggregate conversation by the hour midnight noon messages 11pm 12am
  • 30. conversation by individual work 24 home 12 work 211 home 207 home 22 work 39 work 37 home 87 work 56 home 55 work 1 home 5 work 12 home 11 work 95 home 19
  • 31.
    • what do we know about the network ?
  • 32. location / proximity New Jersey
  • 33. length of time spent on project A B C A B C Project Inception Phase B Complete Project Handoff to Client Staffed on project Individuals end date on project Project timeline
  • 34. social networks: when joined A B C A B C Project Inception Phase B Complete Project Handoff to Client Staffed on project Individual joined social network Project timeline
  • 35. what did we learn? 23% more productive Cant quantifyyet.
  • 36. what we can say
    • project members willingly shared work and personal information, during and outside of work hours, via social networks
    • relative project success measures:
    • the project lives on and has momentum
    • project went further than 2 previous efforts to achieve the same thing
    • The team continues to use social networks without our presence
  • 37. what we can say
    • project members willingly shared work and personal information, during and outside of work hours, via social networks
    • other, less effective team building/collaboration efforts:
    • contact list
    • email distribution lists
    • project servers
    • a war room
    • status meetings show-and-tells
    • after work events
  • 38. how could we more definitively quantify this behavior?
    • participation measurement
            • experiments to increase participation vs. keep organic
      • contribution measurement
            • what is the ratio of social to work oriented content
            • does this differ by discipline and role?
      • at what points in the project is social network activity most critical?
  • 39. whats next?
    • conversation
    • rob zand
    • jason pryslak