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  • RESEARCH POSTER PRESENTATION DESIGN © 2012

    www.PosterPresentations.com

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  • Scope for the IPM standard What is a CEN standard? Xxxxxx

    CEN/TC 346 www.cen.eu

    This European standard defines IPM principles and describes procedural as well as physical and practical methods for preventing and reducing pests and responding to pest infestations/ contaminations within cultural heritage. This standard aims to give a comprehensive standard method of managing pest problems for end users such as museums, archives, libraries, historic houses, places of worship, art dealers and auction rooms, art transportation companies and commercial storage companies. This standard applies to collections and buildings hosting collections and their environment. The standard will be submitted to CEN enquiry in 2014

    Austria, www.as-institute.at Belgium, www.nbn.be Bulgaria, www.bds-bg.org Croatia, www.hzn.hr Cyprus, www.cys.org.cy Czech Republic, www.unmz.cz Denmark, www.ds.dk Estonia, www.evs.ee Finland, www.sfs.fi France, www.afnor.org, Germany, www.din.de Greece, www.elot.gr Hungary, www.mszt.hu Iceland, www.stadlar.is Ireland, www.nsai.ie Italy, www.uni.com Latvia, www.lvs.lv Lithuania, www.lsd.lt Luxembourg, www.ilnas.public.lu Malta, www.mccaa.org.mt The Netherlands, www.nen.nl Norway, www.standard.no Poland, www.pkn.pl Portugal, www.ipq.pt Romania, www.asro.ro Slovakia, www.sutn.sk Slovenia, www.sist.si Spain, www.aenor.es Sweden, www.sis.se Switzerland, www.snv.ch The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, www.isrm.gov.mk Turkey, www.tse.org.tr United Kingdom, www.bsigroup.com

    Integrated Pest Management for Cultural Heritage - Creating a European Standard

    Lisa Nilsen & Ingela Chef Holmberg, Swedish National Heritage Board

    A standard is a document established by consensus, approved by a recognized body that provides for common and repeated use. Standards are based on the consolidated results of science, technology and experience. They are aimed at the promotion of optimum community benefits. CEN's National Members are the National Standards Bodies (NSBs) of the 27 European Union countries, Croatia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and Turkey plus three countries of the European Free Trade Association (Iceland, Norway and Switzerland). There is one member per country. If you want to participate in commenting the draft, contact your national standardisation body (see below).

    • IPM strategy

    • Policies and procedures, IPM coordinator, training and information

    • Preventive measures – avoid, block, detect and respond

    • Annexes: General chapter with

    characterization of insect pests, rodents, mould and other pests, description of treatment methods, check lists, etc.

    Content

    The standard is part of CEN/TC 346 Conservation of Cultural Heritage, Working Group 4 – Protection of Collections.

    Contact info: lisa@lisanilsenkulturvard.se

  • Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings. Founded in 1877. A charitable company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales.

    Company No. 5743962. Charity No. 111 3753. VAT No. 577 4276 02.

    Preventative conservation of large scale geology and biodiversity (places of worship and their surrounding burial grounds) using the ten agents of deterioration and the risk assessment methodology. Andrew, K.J , Regional Project Officer, SPAB Maintenance Co-operatives Project email: kate.andrew@spab.org.uk www.spabmcp.org.uk

    The Society for the Preservation of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) has a three year project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund to create Maintenance Co- operatives for Places of Worship in five re-

    gions of England. The project will improve the maintenance (preventative conserva- tion) of places of worship by training vol- unteers to monitor buildings and under- take basic maintenance tasks.

    Synergies exist between places of worship and museums, particularly natural history museums. The majority are built of stone, so understanding geology is important. They contain objects - mixed media deco- rative and fine art fixtures and fittings from the medieval to the contemporary. Most contain structural timbers and wooden fittings, so knowledge of inte- grated pest management is important. The buildings and their surroundings pro- vide habitats for bats, owls, peregrines, reptiles, invertebrates and flora as diverse as lichens and rare orchids. Responsibility for places of worship lies with the congregation and in the Church of England, is vested in Churchwardens; all volunteers. As in museums, volunteers have variable skill sets and knowledge. Since the 1950s, care of religious buildings has been seen as an “expert” task but with dwindling congregations and far fewer priests, especially in rural areas, this needs to change.

    Kate Andrew, the Herefordshire and Worcestershire officer is using the ten agents of deterioration and the risk as- sessment methodology to train

    colleagues and volunteers. The approach will aid baseline survey assessments and the creation of management plans for places of worship so that day to day

    preventative conservation can be taken in hand at a community level.

    Five regions of operation, Here- fordshire and Worcestershire in blue

    Physical forces - active places of worship within this region include several buildings that are over 1,000 years old. Evidence of type 1 historic damage and its mitigation is there-

    fore quite common, usually caused by later alterations and enlargements of buildings. With several active geologi- cal faults running through the region, type 2 risks such as minor earth tremors occur at a frequency of once every three to five years.

    Type 3 risks due to the length of time buildings have been in use are normal, for example erosion of stone steps and floors due to the passage of feet over time. Type 3 risks created by erosion of mortar or footings by rain water have the potential to create catas- trophic failure. Fire - fire remains an ever present risk in churches both from external sources such as lightning strike or arson but also from poorly main- tained electrical appliances and candles used within services. With little fire compartmentalisation, the damage caused will usually be of a type 1 level unless the incident occurs whilst the building is in use. As metal prices rise, the risk of theft of lightning conductors increases and so creates an additional type 1 risk. Water - direct damage from water ingress into church build- ings is the most commonly recognised risk to places of worship

    but it