biomechanics of human lower extremity ent 214 biomechanics picture retrieved from picture retrieved

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Biomechanics of Human Lower Extremity ENT 214 Biomechanics Picture retrieved from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/f0/Tablu cture retrieved from tp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/ d6/CT_3D_human_Foot_Skin_and_Bone.jpeg

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  • Slide 1
  • Biomechanics of Human Lower Extremity ENT 214 Biomechanics Picture retrieved from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/f0/Tablum.jpg Picture retrieved from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/ d/d6/CT_3D_human_Foot_Skin_and_Bone.jpeg
  • Slide 2
  • Structure of the Hip What is the hip joint? a ball and socket joint where the head of the femur articulates with the concave acetabulum a more stable joint than the shoulder because of bone structure and the number and strength of the muscles and ligaments crossing the joint
  • Slide 3
  • Structure of the Hip The integrity of the hip is enhanced by the strong ligaments crossing the joint. Iliofemoral (Y) ligament Pubofemoral ligament Femur Ischium Anterior view Femur Iliofemoral ligament Ischiofemoral ligament Ischium Posterior view
  • Slide 4
  • Structure of the Hip The pelvic girdle includes the two ilia and the sacrum. It can be rotated forward, backward, and laterally to optimize positioning of the hip. Femoral head Femur Acetabulum Ilium Sacrum Pubis Ischium
  • Slide 5
  • Movements at the Hip What movements of the femur are facilitated by pelvic tilt? Pelvic tilt direction Femoral movement posteriorflexion anteriorextension lateral (to opposite abduction side)
  • Slide 6
  • Movements at the Hip What muscles contribute to flexion at the hip? iliacus psoas major assisted by: pectineus rectus femoris sartorius tensor fascia latae Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Sartorius.png
  • Slide 7
  • Picture retrieved from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e2/Anterior_Hip_Muscles_2.PNG
  • Slide 8
  • Movements at the Hip What muscles contribute to extension at the glenohumeral joint? gluteus maximus hamstrings biceps femoris semimembranosus semitendinosus Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluteus_maximus
  • Slide 9
  • Picture retrieved from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c6/Gluteus_maximus_muscle.PNG
  • Slide 10
  • Movements at the Hip What muscles contribute to abduction at the glenohumeral joint? gluteus medius assisted by: gluteus minimus
  • Slide 11
  • Movements at the Hip What muscles contribute to adduction at the glenohumeral joint? adductor magnus adductor longus adductor brevis assisted by: gracilis
  • Slide 12
  • Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Anterior_Hip_Muscles_2.PNG
  • Slide 13
  • Structure of the Knee What is the tibiofemoral joint? dual condyloid articulations between the medial and lateral condyles of the tibia and the femur; composing the main hinge joint of the knee considered to be the knee joint
  • Slide 14
  • Structure of the Knee Bony structure of the tibiofemoral joint. Patella Tibia Fibula Femur
  • Slide 15
  • Structure of the Knee What is the patellofemoral joint? articulation between the patella and the femur the patella improves the mechanical advantage of the knee extensors by as much as 50%
  • Slide 16
  • Structure of the Knee What are the menisci? cartilaginous discs located between the tibial and femoral condyles structures that distribute the load at the knee over a large surface area and also help absorb shock
  • Slide 17
  • Structure of the Knee The menisci of the knee. Lateral meniscus Posterior cruciate ligament Transverse ligament Anterior cruciate ligament Medial meniscus Superior view
  • Slide 18
  • Structure of the Knee What major ligaments cross the knee? collateral ligaments - cross the medial and lateral aspects of the knee cruciate ligaments - cross each other in connecting the anterior and posterior aspects of the knee
  • Slide 19
  • Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Gray348.png
  • Slide 20
  • Movements at the Knee What muscles contribute to flexion at the knee? popliteus - unlocks the fully extended knee by laterally rotating the femur with respect to the tibia to allow flexion to proceed
  • Slide 21
  • Picture retrieved from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c1/Gray439.png
  • Slide 22
  • Movements at the Knee What muscles contribute to flexion at the knee? hamstrings assisted by: gracilis sartorius popliteus gastrocnemius
  • Slide 23
  • Picture retrieved from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Gray1239.png
  • Slide 24
  • Movements at the Hip What muscles contribute to extension at the hip? quadriceps: rectus femoris vastus lateralis vastus medialis vastus intermedius Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Illu_lower_extremity_muscles.jpg
  • Slide 25
  • Structure of the Ankle The bony structure of the ankle. Fibula Tibia Talus Calcaneus Posterior view
  • Slide 26
  • Structure of the Ankle What is the tibiotalar joint? hinge joint where the convex surface of the superior talus articulates with the concave surface of the distal tibia considered to be the ankle joint
  • Slide 27
  • Structure of the Ankle What is the distal tibiofibular joint? a syndesmosis where dense, fibrous tissue binds the distal tibia and fibula together Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Ankle_en.svg
  • Slide 28
  • Movements at the Ankle What muscles contribute to dorsiflexion at the ankle? tibialis anterior extensor digitorum longus peroneus tertius assisted by: extensor hallucis longus
  • Slide 29
  • Picture retrieved from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/46/Peroneus_tertius.png
  • Slide 30
  • Movements at the Ankle What muscles contribute to plantar flexion at the ankle? gastrocnemius soleus assisted by: tibialis posterior, plantaris, peroneus longus, flexor hallucis longus, peroneus brevis, flexor digitorum longus
  • Slide 31
  • Structure of the Foot What is the subtalar joint? the anterior and posterior facets of the talus articulate with the sustencalculum tali on the superior calcaneus)
  • Slide 32
  • Structure of the Foot Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Foot.png
  • Slide 33
  • Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Gray268.png
  • Slide 34
  • Structure of the Foot What are the tarsometatarsal and intermetatarsal joints? nonaxial joints that permit only gliding movements enable the foot to function as a semirigid unit and to adapt flexibly to uneven surfaces during weight bearing
  • Slide 35
  • Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Gray358.png
  • Slide 36
  • Structure of the Foot What are the metatarsophalangeal and interphalangeal joints? condyloid and hinge joints, respectively the toes function to smooth the weight shift to the opposite foot during walking and help maintain stability during weight bearing by pressing against the ground when necessary
  • Slide 37
  • Structure of the Foot What are the plantar arches? the medial and lateral longitudinal arches stretch form the calcaneus to the metatarsals and tarsals the transverse arch is formed by the bases of the metatarsal bones
  • Slide 38
  • Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantar_fascia Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantar_arch Plantar Arch Plantar Fascia
  • Slide 39
  • Structure of the Foot What are the plantar fascia? thick bands of fascia that cover the plantar aspects of the foot During weight bearing, mechanical energy is stored in the stretched ligaments,tendons, and plantar fascia of the foot. This energy is released to assist with push-off of the foot from the surface.
  • Slide 40
  • Structure of the Foot The plantar fascia. Lateral view Plantar view Plantar fascia
  • Slide 41
  • Movements of the Foot What muscles are responsible for toe flexion and extension? flexion - flexor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis, quadratus plantae, lumbricals, interossei extension - extensor hallucis longus, extensor digitorum longus, extensor digitorum brevis
  • Slide 42
  • Picture retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Gray442.png
  • Slide 43
  • Movements of the Foot What muscles are responsible for inversion and eversion? inversion - tibialis posterior, tibialis anterior eversion - peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, assisted by peroneus tertius