bme insights spring 2011 v4bme. strengths of your research field and approach? i am a neuroengineer

Download bme insights Spring 2011 v4bme. strengths of your research field and approach? I am a neuroengineer

Post on 06-Aug-2020

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Research after I received my Bachelors in 2005.

    I began working in the labora- tory of Dr. David Sabatini, MD, PhD on a project to increase the

    speed and reliability of ana- lyzing high content biologi- cal images. The name of the project was CellProfiler (www.cellprofi ler.com) which is now available for free to the research commu- nity. This unique software reduced the variability and human error inherent to analyzing biological images by applying mathematically determined algorithms for segmentation and measure- ment. This powerful soft- ware is used by Dr. Sabatini’s laboratory to (cont’d p 6)

    MARCH 2011 VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1

    Professors Van C. Mow, X. Edward Guo, Shu Chien, Yingxiao Wang, Ning Wang, Masaaki Sato, and Cheng Dong at the Gala Dinner.

    The rise of engineering in the twentieth century led to pro- found change for humankind. The advances in biology were equally amazing. The term “cellular and molecular bio- engineering” (CMBE) became accepted, and it became pos- sible to culture cells outside of the body. Both the Bio- medical Engineering Society (BMES) and the Society for Physical Regulation in Biol- ogy and Medicine (SPRBM) realized the importance of research at this remarkable (cont’d p 4)

    GRADUATE STUDENT PROFILE: MICHAEL LAMPRECHT

    My undergraduate studies at Boston University laid the groundwork for my future as a Biomedical Engineer. Through extensive course- work and my senior project, I developed an appreciation for the complexity of human physiology. However, I saw an immense opportunity to apply both engineering princi- ples and our vast and rapidly growing technologies to tease apart even the most complex biological systems. It is this drive which led me to con- tinue my work at The White- head Institute for Biomedical

    THE FU FOUNDATION SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    BME INSIGHTS

    DEPARTMENTAL STATISTICS

    AY2010-11

    CORE FACULTY: 21

    UNDERGRADUATE CLASS, JUNIORS AND SENIORS:

    70

    M.S. CANDIDATES: 44

    M.S.-TO-PH.D. CANDIDATES: 25

    PH.D. CANDIDATES: 69

    INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

    NEW CENTER FOR REGENERATION

    2

    FACULTY PROFILE 3

    BIOENGINEERING CONFERENCE

    4

    NEWS & STUDENT AWARDS

    5

    GRADUATE PROFILE

    6

    FACULTY AWARDS 7

    KEY ACADEMIC DATES

    8

    Inaugural Conference on cellular and molecular bioengineering

  • The New Craniofacial Regeneration Center (CRC)

    Six Columbia University Bio- medical Engineering students received new National Sci- ence Foundation (NSF) fel- lowships for 2010-2011. The new fellows are: Michael Khalil, Zen Liu, Hoang Lu, Genevieve Miller, An Nguyen, and Niccola Perez. Congratulations to the winners!

    These students will receive three-year support with $30,000 in annual stipend and $10,500 to support the costs of education, including tui- tion.

    To prepare students for the application process, Professor Helen Lu holds annual work- shop sessions to provide an overview of the salient points

    Bme National Science Foundation Graduate Student Awards

    PAGE 2 BME INSIGHTS

    of application procedures and key points that should be in- cluded in fellowship applica- tions. Current fellows also attend to discuss their experi- ences with the application process and their strategies for emphasizing the primary NSF goals of finding projects that have high intellectual merit and significant broader impacts.

    Further, Professor Lu reviews some individual applications to provide direct feedback to ap- plicants. These efforts had led to significantly improved suc- cess rates, including capturing 10% of all NSF fellowships awarded in 2008.

    Keep your eyes peeled for the next NSF Fellowship Work- shop!

    The Center for Craniofacial Regeneration is co-founded by the College of Dental Medicine (CDM) and Department of Bio- medical Engineering (DBME) to foster fundamental research, development of new technologies, interdisciplinary training and interactions with other centers of excellence at Columbia University and worldwide. The Center will be co-directed by Professor Jeremy Mao (CDM) and Professor Gordana Vunjak- Novakovic (DBME), and hosted in their laboratories in the Vanderbilt Clinic, 12th floor, Columbia University Medical Center.

    Dr. Ira B. Lamster 
Dean, College of Dental Medicine


    Dr. Feniosky Peña-Mora


    Dean, Fu Foundation School of Engineering & Applied Science


    Dr. Jeremy Mao & Dr. Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic
 Co-Directors, Center for Craniofacial Regeneration

    will inaugurate the
 Center for Craniofacial Regeneration

    Wednesday, March 2, 2011
2:30 - 5:30 PM

    The agenda for the inauguration follows:

    2:00-2:05 PM: Dr. Thomas Cangialoni, Waugh Professor of Dental Medicine and Chair, Section of Growth and Develop- ment, Columbia

    2:05-2:10 PM: Dr. Ira Lamster, Dean, College of Dental Medi- cine

    2:10-2:15 PM: Dr. Lee Goldman, Dean, Faculty of Health Sci- ences and Medicine, Columbia

    2:15-2:20 PM: Dr. Feniosky Peña-Mora, Dean, Columbia Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science

    2:20-3:00 PM: Keynote Speaker, Dr. Robert Langer, Institute Professor, MIT

    3:00-3:30 PM: Dr. Jeremy Mao, E.V. Zegarek Professor of Dental Medicine, Co-Director, CRC, Columbia

    3:30-4:00 PM: Dr. Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Co-Director, CRC, Columbia

    4:00-5:00 PM: Reception (Faculty Club) & Tour (VC12)

  • Tell us a bit about yourself.

    I received my B.S. in Electri- cal Engineering from MIT and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Bioengi- neering from the University of Pennsylvania. My disserta- tion focused on developing a neuro-inspired computational model of surface and object representations in intermedi- ate-level vision. After receiv- ing my Ph.D. I took a job in industry at the David Sarnoff Research Center in Princeton NJ, where I eventually be- came the Head of a Group in Adaptive Image and Signal Processing. At Sarnoff I did quite a bit of work in machine learning and computer vision, largely applied to neural sig- nals and imaging data, and was also involved in the de- velopment of several spin-out companies. I came to Colum- bia because I wanted to keep studying basic questions on how our visual system works; in particular how we rapidly analyze information in a visual scene.

    What is your primary research focus?

    In general I work on under- standing how we humans are able to make rapid decisions given visual information. For example, how is it that when we run through the park and, with the briefest of glances of a fellow jogger, we can im- mediately recognize that they are one of our classmates, a famous movie star or some- body we could swear we met on the street? Our ability to make rapid visual judgements

    is amazing given how slow individual neurons fire rela- tive to the switching speeds of transistors in state-of-the-art digital electronics--neurons are a billion times slower! So it is likely the basic principles of how we rapidly assess a visual scene and make snap decisions is very different from how a computer might do it. My research uses mul- timodal neuroimaging and large-scale computational modeling to investigate the information processing prin- ciples and representations that lead to our abilities for rapid visual decision making.

    Why is this important to study?

    Understanding how we make decisions is a fundamental question studied by many groups, including neuroscien- tists, psychologists, econo- mists and philosophers. Thus to understand the principles and processing strategies of decision making is to also u n d e r s t an d , i n s o m e sense, the essence of what makes us human. However I am also a pragmatist and I believe we can use our basic science knowledge to build systems to assist us in our decision making processes, particularly when decisions must be made under stress, information overload or other non-optimal factors. For example, I have built a system called "cortically-coupled computer vision" which inte- grates human visual process- ing and computer vision via a

    brain computer interface (BCI). The system enables a new type of image search, where the human operator can convey to the computer information on what they decided is interesting and the computer can take that infor- mation and retrieve visually similar images. What is novel about the system is that the conveying of the information between the human and ma- chine is done using brain sig-

    nals derived from the electro- encephalogram (EEG), and that by combining rapid hu- man judgments of images and computer based processing, p e o p l e c a n s u b j e c - tively search much larger image databases than they ever could before. This sys- tem is being activity tested by the U.S. Government for a n u m b e r o f s e c u r i t y / intelligence applications, ranging from analysis of satel- lite imagery to screening air- plane cargo. Finally, there are many neurological dis- eases and deficits that have their basis in abnormal deci- sion making and some of the basic research and applied

    FACULTY PROFILE: PAUL SAJDA

    PAGE 3 VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1

    “Understanding how we make decisions is a fundamental

    question”

    system designs my labora- tory works on will be u