boston cookbook 1884

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  • MKN LINCOLN'S

    BOSTON COOK BOOK.

    WHAT TO DO AND WHAT KOT TO DO

    /X COOKING.

    MRS. D. A. LINCOLN,THE- BOSTON COOKIKG SCHOOU

    BOSTON:ROBLKTS BROTHERS.

    1884.

  • Br Mat O. A. t-tmco

  • 5Tf)ig Book is

    MRS. S A M U E L T. HOOPER,

    THE PUPILS, PAST AND PRESENT,

    BOSTON COOKING SCHOOL,

  • to know Qt lar^p of things remote

    m use., obscure and subtle, but to know

    t which before us lies in daily life,

    1 6 P n n ' e W ' m < MILTO:

    5 true knowledge." CONS

  • PREFACE.

    To compile a book which shall be not only a collectionof receipt?, given briefly for tlie experienced housekeeper,and with sufficient clearness for the beginner, but whichshall also embody enough of physiology, and of the chem-istry and philosophy of food, to make every principle in-telligible to a child and interesting to the mature mind;which shall serve equally well for the cook in the kitchen,tile pupil in tlie school-room, and the teacher in the normalclass. is a difficult task. Yet the need of a hook ofmoderate cost, containing in a reasonably small eompass allthis and much more, has been seriously felt by all who areengaged in teaching cookery. Moreover, there is a specialreason for the publication of this work. It is undertakenat the urgent request of the pupils of the Boston CookingSchool, who have desired that the receipts and lessonsgiven during the last four years in that institution shouldbe arranged in a permanent form.

    To one who from childhood has been trained in all de-tails of housework, learning bv observation or by actualexperience much that it is impossible to receive frombooks, the amount of ignorauee shown by many women issurprising. That a person of ordinary intelligence pre-siding over her household can be satisfied with only avague conception of the common domestic methods, orthat any true woman can see anything degrading in anyIa1>or necessary for tiie highest physical condition of her

  • vi Preface.

    family, would be incredible if the truth of it were notdaily manifest.

    Happily, popular opinion now decides that no younglady's education is complete without a course of trainingin one or more branches of domestic work. And thosewho are not so fortunate as to have the best of all train-ingthat of actual work under a wise and competentmother gladly resort to the cooking-Schools for in-struction.

    In compiling these receipts for use in a school and inthe family, several things were demanded. In a schoolof pupils from every class and station in life, a greatvariety of receipts is desirable They must be clear,but concise, for those who are already well grounded infirst principles. They must be explained, illustrated, andreiterated for the inexperienced and the careless. Theymust have a word of caution for those who stem alwaysto have the knack of doing the wrong thing. They mustinclude the most healthful foods for those who have beenmade ill by improper food ; the cheapest as well as themost nutritious, for the laboring class; the richest andmost elaborately prepared, for those who can afford themphysically as well as pecuniarily.

    These receipts are not a mere compilation. A largeportion have accumulated during a long period of house-keeping; and many have been received from friends whoare practical housekeepers. Others have been taken fromstandard authorities ori cooking; and all have been fre-quently and thoroughly tested by pupils under the eye ofthe author. As far as possible, acknowledgment has beenmade for the receipts received, Where changes and im-provements have been made, or where there were manyauthorities for the same formula, no credit has been given.

    Some cook-books presuppose the presence of an as-sistant ; but as three fourths of the women in this country

  • vii

    do their own work, these receipts are arranged so as torequire tho attention of bat one person.

    It is proverbial tbat young housekeepers are oftengreatly perplexed in attempting to provide little enoughfor only two. For their benefit many of our receipts areprepared ou a scale of smaller measurements.

    Tiie materials to be used are given in the order in whichthey are to be put together. They are arranged in col-umns, where the eye may catch them readily, or in italicswhere economy of space seemed desirable.

    Even- caution or suggestion has been given at the re-qtiest of some pupil who failed to find in other books justwhat she needed ; or because, in the experience of teach-ing, it has been shown that, unless forewarned, pupilsinevitably make certain mistakes. Many subjects whichin other books are omitted or given briefly, will be foundto have received here an extensive treatment, becausethey have seemed of paramount importance.

    All the chemical and physiological knowledge that isuecessarv for a clear understanding of the laws of health,BO far as they are involved in the science of cookery, isgiven in this book. Nine tenths of the women who gothrough a scientific course in seminaries never put anyof tho knowledge gained into practical use. By the timeihev have occasion to use auch knowledge in their ownhomes, the Chemistry and Physiology have been relegatedto the attic, whore they help mice to material for theirnests, but help no woman to appty the principles ofscience upon which the health and welfare of her house-hold largely depend.

    The statement will appear incredible to most people,and yet it is true, that many women do not know whatthe simplest things in our daily food arc ; cannot toll whenwater boile, or the difference between lamb and vual, lardand drippings. They cannot give the names of kitchen

  • viii Preface.

    utensils; do not koow anything; aboat a stove, or bow topare a potato. This will explain what might otherwiseseem an unnecessary minuteness of detail. The expe-rience of such ignorance also euggvsttii the mib-title ofthe " Boston Cook Book," " What to do and what no*to do in Cooking,"just how to bold your bowl and spoon,to use your hands, to regulate your stove, to wa#ti yourdishes; and just how not to fait into the error* into wbichso many have stumbled l**fore you. But, more Ibaa all,it is attempted to give & reason for even' step takes, anda clear answer to any questions that are likely 10 UJM Inthe experience of either housekeeper or cook.

  • A PREFACE NOT FOR THE PUBLIC.

    A WORD of grateful acknowledgment is due the manyfriends who have aided in this work.

    First, to my mother I owe much for her excellent judg-ment in training me as a child to a love for all house-hold work. Although it was often hard to t f help mother "when other children were at play, the knowledge thusgained has proved invaluable. Ever}- year's experienceiu teaching lias made me prize more and more this earlytraining.

    Also, I am deeply indebted to Miss II . S. DEVEREUXfor the illustrations of this book. In ail my work I havebeen greatly aided by her suggestions and generoussympathy.

    And, lastly, I would not forget my obligations to a largecircle of personal friends. Especially would I rememberthe one who, twenty years ago, aided me in making myfirst loaf of bread, and the many among my pupils who,out of their varied experience, have contributed much thathas proved helpful.

    MAltY J. LINCOLN.

    WoLnsTos, MASS., 1884.

  • 'n. ' )

    CONTENTS.

    INTRODUCTION 1

    BUEAD AND BREAD MAKING 36

    RECEIPTS FOR YEAST AND BREAB 62

    RAISED BISCUIT, ROLLS, ETC 68

    STALE BREAD, TOAST, ETC 75

    SODA BISCUIT, MUFFINS, GEMS, ETC 80

    WAFFLES AND GRIDDLE-CAKES 97

    TRIED MUFFINS, FRITTERS, DOUGHNUTS, ETC 102

    OATMEAL AND OTHER GIIAINS 108

    BEVERAGES I l l

    SOUP AKD STOCK . 119

    SoUF WITHOUT STOCK 116FISH 159

    SHELL FISH . 175

    MEAT AND FISH SAUCES 187

    EGGS 197

    MEAT . 3 1 0

    BEEF 214

    MUTTON AND LAMB 232

    VEAL 239

    PORK 245

    POULTRY ANT> GAME 251

    ENTREES AND MEAT RECHAUFFE 265

    SUNDRIF.5 282

  • Contents.

    VEGETABLES 289

    RICE AND MACARONI . $QQ

    SALADS . . . 309

    PASTRY AKD PIES 316

    PUDDING SAUCES -J28

    HOT PUDDINGS . 332

    CUSTARDS, JELLIES, AND CREAMS - . 341

    ICE-CEEAM AND SHERBET .

    CAKE

    PRUIT

    COOKING FOR INVALIDS . .

    MISCELLANEOUS HINTS . .

    EXPLANATION OF TEEMS

    361

    369

    391

    407

    435THE D I N I M - R O O M

    THE CARE OF KITCHEN UTENSILS 443

    A N OUTLINE O F STUDY FOR TEACIIEKS . . . . . . 449

    SUGGESTIONS TO TEACHERS 4S3

    A COURSE OF STUDY FOR NORMAL PUPILS 485

    MISCELLANEOUS QUESTIONS FOK EXAMINATION 486

    TOPICS AND ILLUSTRATIONS FOR LECTURES ON COOKERY , 490

    COURSE OF INSTRUCTION AT THE BOSTON COOKING-SCHOOL . 495

    USED O COOKERY 503

    LIST OF UTENSILS NEEDED IN A COOKING-SCHOOL . . . 508

    GENERAL INDEX . . 513

    ALPHABETICAL INDEX 529

  • >'*>$ V

    LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

    F I G . 1 . G r a i n o f W h e a t 3 7" 2 . G r a i n o f W h e a t w i t h B r a n r e m o v e d . . . . 3 8" S . G r a i n o f W h e a t m a g n i f i e d . . . . . . . 3 8" 4 . Y e a s t P l a n t 46" 5. C r u l l e r 105" 6 . C r u l l e r a f t e r F o l d i n g 105" 1. Baked Fish 164 8. Small Fish served whole 166" 9. Scalloped Lobster 183" 10. Omelet 201" 11. Orange Omelet 202" 12. Eggs and Minced Meat 205" 13. Stuffed Eggs 206" 14. Eggs a la Crcme 208" 15. Diagram of Ox 212" 16. Hind Quarter of Beef 212' 17. Aitch Bone 214" 18. Round 215" 19. Back of Rump 216'< 20. First Cut of Sirtom 216" 21. Sirloin Roast 217" 22. Tip of Sirloin 218" 2 3 . First Cut of Rib 219" 24. Chuck Rib 219" 2 5 . Fillet of Beef 222" 26. Mutton Puck 235" 27. Paper Ruffle 236

  • List of Illustrations.

    F