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Captivating Creatures: Cruising Through Cryptozoology http://captivatingcreatures.weebly.com/ Cryptic Cryptids Developing Documentaries Filmmaking Fanatics Lights, Camera, Action! Welcome to a crash course into the elusive world of cryptozoology! Cryptozoology literally means “the study of hidden animals” and involves the search for undiscovered creatures, such as Bigfoot and the Lochness Monster. In addition to learning about the creatures that have captivated audiences all over the world, you will also explore why people are so fascinated with these beings. You will interview a Bigfoot researcher and create a documentary film about cryptozoology and the people who seek out these elusive creatures! What compels humans to search for undiscovered creatures, or cryptids? Why do filmmakers use documentaries to convey information?

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Captivating Creatures: Cruising Through CryptozoologyNicole Horne and Lauren SturialeCaptivating Creatures: Cruising Through Cryptozoology

http://captivatingcreatures.weebly.com/

Cryptic CryptidsDeveloping DocumentariesFilmmaking FanaticsLights, Camera, Action!

Welcome to a crash course into the elusive world of cryptozoology! Cryptozoology literally means the study of hidden animals and involves the search for undiscovered creatures, such as Bigfoot and the Lochness Monster. In addition to learning about the creatures that have captivated audiences all over the world, you will also explore why people are so fascinated with these beings. You will interview a Bigfoot researcher and create a documentary film about cryptozoology and the people who seek out these elusive creatures!

What compels humans to search for undiscovered creatures, or cryptids?Why do filmmakers use documentaries to convey information?Why is learning how to operate video equipment an essential skill in documentary filmmaking?

Nicole Horne and Lauren SturialeSPED 6402 Spring 2014East Carolina University

CONTENT RESEARCH PAPER

Captivating Creatures: Cruising Through CryptozoologyCryptozoology: What is it?Cryptozoology is the study of animals and othercreaturesthat have not yet been accepted by science as real. Cryptozoology literally mean the study of hidden animals with the word crypto coming from the Greek word meaning hidden and zoology meaning the study of animal life. Many experts consider cryptozoology to be a pseudoscience usually because of a lack of conclusive evidence of existence, or the recognition of a prerequisite type specimen (Heuvelmans, 1982); however, there are countless people who give into their natural human curiosity and are drawn to the mystique of the unknown, undiscovered, and unexplained.The notion of cryptids being hidden, in many cases, is solely based on the fact that that the creature is unable to be classified because of lack of evidence or lack of awareness of evidence; because of this, the unifying theme of cryptozoology often is more related to a persons perception of a creature (or idea of a creature) rather than what is inherently known about a creature (Bindernagel and Meldrum, 2012). Thus, it is easy to dismiss cryptozoology and those who search for cryptids as fantasy seekers chasing creatures who do not exist or who have long been extinct. For instance, many species may only be considered cryptids because they live in remote or human impenetrable habitats or that their reported existence is unexpected (e.g., thought to be extinct) (Bindernagel and Meldrum, 2012).Dr. Bernard HeuvelmansDr. Bernard Heuvelmans was born in France in 1916. Dr. Heuvelmans received his doctorate in zoology from the Free University in Brussels in 1939. Dr. Heuvelmans wrote many books and dozens of articles on the validity of cryptozoology and, until his death in 2001, was known as the father of cryptozoology. Dr. Heuvelmans most recognized work is his book, On the Track of Unknown Animals (Heuvelmans, 1995).Bigfoot: The Most Famous Cryptid?The most well-known cryptid throughout the world is known by many names including: Sasquatch and Bigfoot. Speculations of a creature like the elusive Bigfoot have been prevalent since the 1800s (Bindernagel and Meldrum, 2012). Native Americans have told stories about creatures similar to Bigfoot including the Salish tribe of British Columbia who named Bigfoot Sasquatch, which means wild man of the woods. Also, the Huppa Native Americans called Bigfoot Oh-Ma, which means big foot. To help perpetuate the name Bigfoot, the elusive creatures tracks have been discovered all over the world: Documentation of its tracks in photographs and casts affirms its existence as a track-leaving North American mammal. (Bindernagel and Meldrum, 2012).In addition to the oral tradition of Bigfoot stories and the numerous footprints that have been discovered around the world, one of the strongest and most compelling pieces of evidence that best solidifies the existence of Bigfoot, or a creature like Bigfoot, was a video taken by Robert Patterson in 1967. The video, which consists of less than a minute of 16mm film shot along northern Californias Bluff Creek, even after forty-seven years, still provides the most solid proof of the existence of Bigfoot. The Patterson film has undergone sophisticated analyses by those experts willing to few it and; in spite of rumored accomplices, a supposed death-bed confession, and charges of a case of a man-in-a-fur-suit, the film is still seen as a compelling piece of evidence and has even led some experts to believe that the creature portrayed in the video, because of the way it moves, cannot possibly be a human in a suit (Bindernagel and Meldrum, 2012).North American Bigfoot SearchAs a result of evidence from Patterson video, many North American Bigfoot research societies have emerged across America. One of the largest organizations is the North American Bigfoot Search (NABS). The North America Bigfoot Search (NABS) is a privately funded organization that had its start in Silicon Valley, California. Members of this research society are dedicated to thoroughly searching areas in America were reported Bigfoot sighting have occurred until every possible angle of every sighting has been researched, witnesses interviewed, locations and food sources understood, and an extensive list of variables answered. The NABS will stay in a community sometimes for months/Years and thereby develop the trust, integrity and contacts to make their research valuable and enlightening. The research of the NABS have even gone as far as to attempt to determine the DNA of a Bigfoot creature by collecting a hair sample found at the scene of what was thought to be a Bigfoot sighting (North American Bigfoot Search, 2011).Overview of Documentaries

Documentary filmmaking allows information about real people and events to be disseminated to viewers all over the world, in a profound, poignant way; it is a way for filmmakers to broadcast their idea of political, historical, and social information. However, Documentary filmmaking is more than simply coming up with a good topic, pointing the camera and hoping something interesting will happen (Pooley, 2009, p. 47). Because documentaries capture the essence of real-life, oftentimes the veracity of the information presented comes with controversy and skepticism: Documentary filmmakers are continually faced with decisions beyond where to put the tripod; they are coping with impossible moral dilemmas, emotionally charged situations in difficult and sometimes dangerous environments (Pooley, 2009, p. 48). Even with the arduous situations and criticisms for filmmakers, documentaries permit viewers to live vicariously through the information and real-life experiences they see. A documentary can mitigate myopic opinions, and open peoples eyes to new perspective and insights.Elements of DocumentariesDocumentaries are comprised of certain techniques that help to persuade, enlighten, and inform. According to Pooley (2009), a documentary requires a story with some form of narrative or journey. They should have interesting characters, turning points, shift in tone and pace, humor alongside darkness, a climax (p. 47). These important literary and thematic elements should be coupled with images, video footage, and music. One of the most important facets of a documentary is the narration. In a documentary, viewers will prevalently experience either direct narration or voiceovers. Direct narration is when the audience both hears and sees the narrator in the film, whereas voiceovers are when a narrator or speaker are heard but usually not seen. A voiceover allows an image to fully accompany the speakers delineation (Yahnke, 2009). Analogous to narration is the usage of interview footage in a documentary. There are two main forms of interviews: direct and indirect interview techniques. Direct interviews allow the interviewer and interviewee to both be heard on film; the indirect interview is when the interviewee is the only one heard on camera. Filmmakers prevalently utilize interviews with experts to help show the validity of their documentary and the information presented (Yahnke, 2009).Although narration and interviews are indispensable techniques, documentaries should also be imbued with aesthetic qualities, such as music, images, and text. To make a statement and connect with viewers, camera angels and different types of shots are used, such as long shots and close-up shots. Music is used to compliment visual images (Yahnke, 2009) and evoke emotional responses from viewers. ConclusionDocumentaries have the power to shape opinions, enlighten, and create change. Documentaries are a way to inform people about, sometimes, unfamiliar subjects, such as cryptozoology. While some may view cryptozoology with skepticism, a documentary can divulge new breakthroughs about the search for elusive cryptids. Organizations, such as the North American Bigfoot Search, are striving diligently to prove-through DNA evidence-the existence of Bigfoot. Documentaries have the ability to not only convey information about controversial subjects, but also the ability to change the perspective of doubtful viewers.

ReferencesBindernagel, J., & Meldrum, J. (2012). Misunderstandings arising from treating the sasquatch as a subject of cryptozoology. The Relict Hominoid Inquiry, 2, 81-102. Retrieved from http://www.isu.edu/rhi/pdf/BINDERNAGEL_finalHeuvelmans, B. (1982) What is cryptozoology? Cryptozoology, 1:1-12.Heuvelmans, B. (1995) On the track of unknown animals, 3rd ed., Jacket Cover.North American Bigfoot Search. (2011). North American bigfoot search. Retrieved from http://www.nabigfootsearch.com/home.htmlPooley, L. (2009). What's the story? Metro, (163), 46-48.

Yahnke, R. (2009). A primer of documentary film techniques. Retrieved from

http://www.tc.umn.edu/~ryahnke/filmteach/My-Archive-of-Film-Notes/x-

documentary-techniques.htm

CONNECTION TO THE THEME

Every day, humans are partaking in interactions, whether they are positive or negative. Interactions can come to life in copious ways: communication, collaboration, and contemplation. It is through interactions that opinions and perspectives are shaped, modified, and transformed. Interactions allow meaningful connections to develop, and thought-provoking topics addressed. Students, while learning about cryptozoology and documentary filmmaking, will interact not only with their peers and technology, but also with the human interest in exploring the unknown and undiscovered while interviewing a Bigfoot researcher. Through television shows, such as Finding Bigfoot on Animal Planet and Monsters and Mysteries on the Discovery Channel, most people have heard of Bigfoot and the Lochness Monster. Therefore, it is easy to formulate preconceived ideas about why researchers are searching for these elusive creatures. During our unit, students will have the opportunity to interact with an expert in the field of Bigfoot research and discuss cryptozoology. Through their interview with a Bigfoot researcher from the North American Bigfoot Search, they will ascertain what compels humans to search for undiscovered creatures. Using the information they procured during the interview, they will then become the embodiment of a documentary filmmaker. The documentary will allow students to interact with their opinions and conceptions about Bigfoot research, and showcase to viewers in a factual way what is captivating about cryptozoology.Before students actually begin orchestrating and filming their documentary, they have to learn about what comprises a documentary. Understanding the intricacies, such as narration, point of view, and emotional content, of a documentary will allow students to successfully create and film their own. They will look at the structure, and discuss how to convey mood. The students will explore the interactions between art and fact, and how photographs and music can appeal to their viewers emotions. All of the background information will lead to the true interactive facet of the project: the collaboration and filming. In order for students to create a documentary, they will interact, through collaboration, with each other. During this project, ideas will be discussed, perspectives challenged, and relationships fostered. Patience and compromise will become imperative as students find their role in the filming process. Some will discover their prowess for narration, while others might find their strength in using the camera to film. In the end, their ability to interact with each other will help them create a cohesive, informative documentary film.Once their documentary is complete, the students can also discover the power to influence or enlighten others. Their documentary, featuring an expert in the field of Bigfoot research, will convey to viewers why humans search for undiscovered creatures, such as Bigfoot. Viewers will see the interaction between human interest and the unknown, which can help transform or modify their perspective about cryptozoology and Bigfoot researchers.Interactions are not merely the ability to touch a piece of technology. Interactions can also be intangible, such as an idea or perspective. The students will have the unique ability, throughout this unit, to interact with their own, inherent viewpoints, the viewpoints of an expert, and the viewpoints of their peers. The exploration of cryptozoology and the search for elusive creatures will, hopefully, challenge their opinions and help them grow as individuals.

TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

In the unit, Captivating Creatures: Cruising Through Cryptozoology, several types of technology will be introduced and utilized by both the teachers and the students. The types of technology utilized in this unit will enrich the students camp experience and challenge their creativity. Each day the campers will think critically, collaborate, and strive to show the human interest in the unknown through their own original documentary.Prezi/PowerPointPrezi and PowerPoint are both presentation programs. As the teachers, we will primarily be using the Prezi and/or PowerPoint to relay background information to the students. We intend to use Prezi and/or PowerPoint on the first day to review and explore the following background information: What is cryptozoology? What elements comprise a cryptid? The students will utilize the Prezi and/or PowerPoint Presentations to discuss the history of Bigfoot, and those searching to prove this elusive creatures existence, such as the North American Bigfoot Search. We also intend to use Prezi and/or PowerPoint on the second day to examine the purpose and elements of a documentary. The students will use this technology method to ascertain important background knowledge so that they can be successful in their assignments for the remainder of the camp.Content VideosWe intend to use a couple of content videos to give students background information, provide visual elements, as well as to give the students a catalyst through which they will come up with responses. The videos we intend to show include an Animal Planet Finding Bigfoot clip, a clip from the documentary Ancient Mysteries: Bigfoot, as well as a video of the Richland High School Journalism class creating their weekly video. To help students procure a stronger understanding of the aesthetic elements of documentaries, students will view a video entitled Bully and answer questions about photos, music, and mood. Throughout the week at camp, students will answer critical thinking questions using notebooks, graphic organizers, and Padlet. Skype/CantasiaSkype/Cantasia is a video messaging program. We will use Skype/Cantasia to correspond with a North American Bigfoot researcher. The students will use this Skype/Cantasia session to ask the researcher questions and to explore and ascertain human interest in the unknown or undiscovered and how documentaries are ways for individuals to convey information. We feel that having a Skype/Cantasia session with an actual Bigfoot researcher will make the students documentaries more authentic and tangible. In order to accurately capture the Bigfoot researcher interview, a program called Cantasia will be utilized. The students can then embed both pictures and videos found on their Nikon Cameras, in conjunction with their interview footage into their documentary to truly convey the human interest in Bigfoot.PadletPadlet is a program that allows students to post responses to a wall. We will use Padlet as a forum to have informal discussion. After the students watch the first two content videos (see Content Videos section above), we intend to use Padlet so students may respond to the videos and various discussion questions we will prepare for them. The use of Padlet ensures that every students response is seen, even if he or she is not inclined to share his or her responses vocally.Flip CamerasThe flip Cameras will be the vehicles through which the students actually film their documentaries. These pieces of technology are vital to the documentary making process because they will be using them not only to film each other and to show the content of their documentary, but to also relay the information shared by the Bigfoot researcher. Microsoft Movie MakerMicrosoft Movie Maker will be used in the editing process of creating a documentary. After incorporating a tutorial for using Microsoft Movie Maker, the students will take the content they have filmed and edit it to make a cohesive documentary that covers the facets of Cryptozoology that they have learned about. Then, at the end of camp, they present their final product as their culminating, real world project. The students documentary will delineate the attributes and historical details of Bigfoot, as well as the human interest in Bigfoot. The students will make the reason why humans search for elusive creatures, such as Bigfoot, tangible for viewers.

CONTENT OUTLINE

I. CryptozoologyA. Cryptozoology is the study of animals and othercreaturesthat have not yet been accepted by science as real.1. Crypto comes from the Greek word meaning hidden2. Zoology is the study of animal life B. Considered a pseudoscience 1. Existence of creatures relies on anecdotes and plausible sightingsa. Looking for creatures that are already extinctb. Looking for creatures whose existence pervades myths, legends, and folktalesC. Dr. Bernard Heuvelmans1. Coined the term cryptozoology2. Published the book, On the Track of Unknown Animals in 19553. Named the father of cryptozoologyII. CryptidsA. Although there are creatures whose existence have been scientifically proven, it is the elusive creatures that captivate people around the worldB. One of the most legendary, elusive creatures1. Bigfoota. A humanlike creature that resembles an apeb. Walks on two legsc. Bigfoot is believed to be 7-9 feet tall and weigh 200-300 pounds d. Bigfoot tracks are usually 14-18 inches long and 5-7 inches widei. Tracks have been discovered all over the world e. Bigfoot stories have been told by Native American tribes for centuries i.The Salish tribe of British Columbia named Bigfoot, Sasquatch, which means wild man of the woods.ii. Huppa Native Americans called Bigfoot Oh-Ma, which means big foot.f. In 1907, Robert Patterson captured what could be a female Bigfoot on videoi. Experts are unable to verify the veracity of the videoii.Disney Studios believes a human in a costume would not look real like the Bigfoot captured on filmg. Bigfoot researchers are emerging all over the county, especially in shows, such as Finding Bigfoot on Animal Planet

III. North American Bigfoot SearchA. Privately funded organization1. Founded in 20042. Started in Silicon Valley, CaliforniaB. Bigfoot field researchers 1. Look for physical proof of Bigfoots existence a. DNA and genetic tests are performed on discovered physical evidence2. Researchers may stay at a Bigfoot sighting spot for months or years to meticulously ascertain the areaa. Interview witnessesb. Investigate food sourcesIV. DocumentariesA. Films or shows about real events and real people that usually involves political, historical, and social information1. Intended to instruct, persuade, enlighten, or inform2. Captures real-life situations3. Allows viewers to live vicariously through the information presentedB. Elements that comprise a documentary1. Direct Narration and voiceovers a. See and hear the narrator of the filmb. Impacts viewers emotionsc. Should offer authority yet familiarity for viewers and listenersd. Try to avoid long words and tongue twisters2. Interviews with an experta. May take place off screen or on screenb. Questions are asked the speakeri. Speaker delineates directly about the topic being addressed3. Photographsa. Location shotsb. Still shotsc. Long shotsd. Close-ups4. Film clips/action footagea. Verite footagei. Footage that captures real-lifeb. Thematic/symbolic footagei. Images or scenes that stand for something 5. Musica. Find music that correlates to the pace and content of the documentaryb. Add music to appropriate spots in the documentaryc. Used to impact the viewers emotions C. Ways to orchestrate and organize a documentary1. Storyboardsa. A script in visual form, sequencing the events in a film, television, or radio show using images, video clips, ect.b. Each box in a storyboard represents a different scene in the filmc. Video (interview) footage or images will usually have audio, voiceovers, or text playing simultaneously to compliment the visualsd. Includes a beginning, middle, and endii. Includes dialogue or directionsiii. Includes where music will begin and end iiii. Includes where photographs and interview footage will be placed

V. Technology planA. Flip Cameras1. Turning on and Offa. Button located on the top right hand sidei. Flick grey button twice to turn off2. Recordinga. Aim lens at subject and press the red buttoni. The timer will emerge in the top left hand corner of the view screenb. Press the red button again when finished recording3. Zoominga. The silver plus and minus buttons surrounding the red button4. Playbacka. Press the play button to the left of the red button on the screen5. Deletinga. Press the trashcan button on the right hand side of the red button6. Uploadinga. Pull the silver switch on the left hand side of the camera b. USB connector will emergec. Plug the USB connector into the USB port on a computer

VI. How to Use Movie MakerA. Opening movie maker and saving project1. Click on the Starttab on the desktop2. Click on Windows Movie Makerto open program3. Click File4. Click Save Project As5. Click desktop6. Click on File name and type documentary name7. Click SaveB. Importing and inserting images1. On the left side under Capture Video click Import images2. Click desktop3. Click File and find the location of where images are located4. Highlight all the selected images and click import5. Screen should be in storyboard view. a. To validate, click on the show storyboard in the middle of screen. b. Storyboard view shows a series of boxes at the bottom of the screen. c. Click on the images and drag them into the boxes in the preferred order.i. Images can be deleted by right clicking and selected the delete buttonC. Adding Effects1. Transitionsa. The movement between video clips and imagesb. Click Tools and then Transitionsc. Find the Contents Pane and click play to see what a transition looks like before adding to the storyboardd. To add a transition, click Clip and then add it to the storyboard2. Special Effectsa. Select the video, image, or text b. Click Tools and then Effectsc. Find the Contents Pane to view a special effect before selecting itd. To add the special effect, click clip and then Add to StoryboardD. Editing1. To move video clips and images, click on it and drag to the new location on the storyboard2. To undo changes, find the arrow next to on the toolbar 3. To Redo changes, find the arrow next to Redo on the toolbar4. To zoom in or out, click view, and then Timeline

LESSON #1Curious Cryptids

I. DEFINE OBJECTIVES AND CONTENT

LESSON OBJECTIVEBy analyzing and discussing students the background of cryptozoology, the characteristics of Bigfoot, and why humans search for undiscovered creatures, the students will be able to formulate three discussions questions for their interview with a Bigfoot researcher from the North American Bigfoot Association.

POINT TO PONDERCryptozoology is a useful science, even though there is mitigated proof that creatures, such as Bigfoot, exist.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONWhat compels humans to search for undiscovered creatures, or cryptids?

CONTENTOutline the content you will teach in this lesson. I. CryptozoologyA. Cryptozoology is the study of animals and othercreaturesthat have not yet been accepted by science as real.1. Crypto comes from the Greek word meaning hidden2. Zoology is the study of animal life B. Considered a pseudoscience 1. Existence of creatures relies on anecdotes and plausible sightingsa. Looking for creatures that are already extinctb. Looking for creatures whose existence pervades myths, legends, and folktalesC. Dr. Bernard Heuvelmans1. Coined the term cryptozoology2. Published the book, On the Track of Unknown Animals in 19553. Named the father of cryptozoologyII. CryptidsB. Although there are creatures whose existence have been scientifically proven, it is the elusive creatures that captivate people around the worldB. One of the most legendary, elusive creatures1. Bigfoota. A humanlike creature that resembles an apeb. Walks on two legsc. Bigfoot is believed to be 7-9 feet tall and weigh 200-300 pounds d. Bigfoot tracks are usually 14-18 inches long and 5-7 inches widei. Tracks have been discovered all over the world e. Bigfoot stories have been told by Native American tribes for centuries i.The Salish tribe of British Columbia named Bigfoot, Sasquatch, which means wild man of the woods.ii. Huppa Native Americans called Bigfoot Oh-Ma, which means big foot.f. In 1907, Robert Patterson captured what could be a female Bigfoot on videoi. Experts are unable to verify the veracity of the videoii.Disney Studios believes a human in a costume would not look real like the Bigfoot captured on filmg. Bigfoot researchers are emerging all over the county, especially in shows, such as Finding Bigfoot on Animal Planet

III. North American Bigfoot SearchA. Privately funded organization1. Founded in 20042. Started in Silicon Valley, CaliforniaB. Bigfoot field researchers 1. Look for physical proof of Bigfoots existence a. DNA and genetic tests are performed on discovered physical evidence2. Researchers may stay at a Bigfoot sighting spot for months or years to meticulously ascertain the areaa. Interview witnessesb. Investigate food sources

II. PRE-PLANNING

What will students UNDERSTAND as a result of this lesson? How does this connect to the Essential Question? The students will understand the background and development of cryptozoology.

The students will understand the attributes and history of Bigfoot, such as where the name plausibly derives from and what it looks like.

The students will understand the premise of the North American Bigfoot Search, and how they strive to substantiate Bigfoots existence with DNA proof.

By learning about the background of cryptozoology, the characteristics of Bigfoot, and conducting an interview with a Bigfoot researcher from the North American Bigfoot Search, the students will be able to understand why people search for elusive, undiscovered creatures, such as Bigfoot. The students will procure first-hand knowledge, from the Bigfoot researcher, about why he searches diligently for a creature that has left the scientific community befuddled for years.

What will students be able to DO as a result of this lesson?The students will be able to answer questions, discuss, and illustrate what cryptozoology means, and how it is a pseudoscience.

The students will be able to formulate questions to ask during an interview with a Bigfoot researcher from the North American Bigfoot Search.

III. PLANNING

HOOKDescribe how you will grab students attention at the beginning of the lesson. BE CREATIVE.TIME: (5 minutes)Animal Planet Finding Bigfoot video clip: http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/finding-bigfoot/videos/season-three-best-moments.htm

After the students watch the video clip, they will discuss what they see, or believe they see. The students will discuss the following queries:What do you believe you saw?What evidence did you see that proves or disproves there was a Bigfoot sighting?

INSTRUCTIONExplain Step-by-step what you will do in this lesson. Be explicit about ties to Points to Ponder, Essential Question, and Interactions here. Include ALL support and teaching materials with your unit. TIME: 1. (5 minutes) Hook activity-Animal Planet Finding Bigfoot clip. The students will discuss how they felt while watching the clip, and if they believe they saw anything. They will interact with the excitement of searching for Bigfoot, and their own preconceived ideas about Bigfoots existence. The students will contemplate and discuss the following questions:

What do you believe you saw? What evidence did you see that proves or disproves there was a Bigfoot sighting?

(10 minutes)2. The students will discuss and take notes about the background of cryptozoology using a PowerPoint presentation. The presentation will contain the following information:

Etymology of cryptozoology Pseudoscience Bigfoot appearance, name, and history Popularity of searching for Bigfoot

3. (15 minutes) To understand the beliefs encompassing Bigfoot, the students, in groups of 2 or 3, will read a Native American Bigfoot legend, from the website http://www.bigfootencounters.com/legends.htm. The students will use the information presented in the legend to help them gain an understanding of Bigfoot.

After reading the different legends, the students will start a short discussion about the following queries:

What does Bigfoot look like? Why do you believe Bigfoot has captivated so many people, for so many years? What does your legend of Bigfoot teach you about this elusive creature?

Connection to Point of Ponder and Essential Question: The legend will instigate a discussion and allow the students to ponder the human fascination with Bigfoot. They will be able to investigate not only legends pervading Native American cultures, but also explanations from an expert in the field of Bigfoot research. The students will interact with literary text, which will help strengthen their knowledge about the array of beliefs surrounding his/her existence.

4. (3 minutes) Introduce documentary project by showing and disseminating the students Bigfoot documentary rubric. The students will also watch a short, succinct clip from History Channels MonsterQuest Bigfoot Evidence episode.http://www.history.com/shows/monsterquest/videos/bigfoot-evidence?m=5189719baf036&s=All&f=1&free=false

The students will be able to see the Robert Pattersons Bigfoot footage that was discussed in the PowerPoint Presentation, hear voiceovers, and the experience the informative nature of documentaries This can also serve as a precursor to the day 2 discussion and analysis of documentary filmmaking The students will learn how their documentary will investigate the attributes of Bigfoot, historical details of Bigfoot, and the human interest in Bigfoot-using footage from the interview with the Bigfoot researcher from the North American Bigfoot Search. They will begin learning about and interacting with the human interest in Bigfoot.

5. The students should formulate at least three questions for their interview with the Bigfoot researcher that investigates the following:

Human interest in Bigfoot-what is fascinating, or captivating about Bigfoot? What compels him to search for Bigfoot? The research techniques and strategies of the North American Bigfoot Search

After the students formulate their questions, they will use them during the interview with the Bigfoot researcher.

6. (25 minutes) Interview with a Bigfoot researcher from the North American Bigfoot Search using a program, such as Camtasia or snagit.

Connection to Point of Ponder and Essential Question: The students will receive first-hand knowledge of why humans search for the elusive Bigfoot. The interview will be the students primary source of information for their documentary. They will be able to pose questions and hear an expert in the field of Bigfoot research delineate why his team meticulously searches for proof-especially DNA evidence-of Bigfoots existence.

7. (10 minutes) Instigate a discussion about the usefulness of cryptozoology using the following questions to assess students performance for the day: After your interview with the Bigfoot researcher, why do you believe humans search for elusive creatures, like Bigfoot? Explain.

ASSESSMENT(Performance Task) What will the students DO to demonstrate that they have mastered the content? Be specific and include actual assessment with unit materials. TIME:

The students should formulate questions for their interview with the Bigfoot researcher that investigates the following:

Human interest in Bigfoot-what is fascinating, or captivating about Bigfoot? What compels him to search for Bigfoot? The research techniques and strategies of the North American Bigfoot Search

After the students formulate their questions, they will use them to during the interview with the Bigfoot researcher.

Lastly, the students will complete a question-based assessment using Padlet, reflecting upon their experience with the Bigfoot researcher and the information they discussed during the interview. They will assess how their questions incorporated the information discussed and presented during the lesson, and if their questions helped showcase why people search for elusive creatures, such as Bigfoot. The students will answer the following question:

After your interview with the Bigfoot researcher, why do you believe humans search for elusive creatures, like Bigfoot? Explain.

DOES THE ASSESSMENT ALLOW YOU TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT THE STUDENTS HAVE MET YOUR STATED LESSON OBJECTIVE? YES OR NO

ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALSInsert ALL materials here including Assessments and Instructional Materials.Explicitly LIST any additional files for this lesson. Be sure that ALL materials have been submitted for this lesson.

PowerPoint Presentation about cryptozoology and Bigfoot

Documentary Rubric

Padlet assessment

Documentary Content Elements Rubric

Category4 (Great)3 (Good) 2 (Average)1 (Poor)

Overall effectiveness of film Film was effective, informative and appealing. Film was effective or appealing but not both. Film was not visually interesting. Did not convey information or compelling message. Not interesting or engaging

Effectiveness of Introduction Viewer was hooked from the beginning of the film by a strong opening that introduces the concept of cryptozoology. Viewer was fairly interested by the introduction of cryptozoology Viewer had little reason to keep watching. Ineffective

Film Story All elements of the film were relevant to the overall theme. Events and messages were in a clear, sensible and well structured order to tell the characteristics and history of Bigfoot, along with the human interest in Bigfoot.Most elements of the film were relevant to the overall theme. Events and messages were mostly clear and in order to tell the characteristics and history of Bigfoot, along with the human interest in Bigfoot.Many elements of the film were irrelevant to the overall message. Viewer was not sure what the story was about. No real story structure

Indication of Thinking and Learning The teams clearly had an understanding of their task and subject of Bigfoot. Film showed creativity, high levels of team work and critical-thinking. Film terminology was well understood Film showed a basic command of the subject of Bigfoot, but lacked some creativity and thoughtfulness. There was little indication of team work imagination, creativity, research, and thoughtfulness in the film. No creativity or imagination used

Literacy Constructs media texts (images, text and sound) in a meaningful way to make meaning and to entertain. Partially constructs media texts to make meaning and to entertain Little entertainment in the way the media text was constructed Not entertaining

Appeal tThe message that humans have a reason for searching for Bigfoot is easily identified and conveyed in an appealing, informative, entertaining, emotive way There is a message about why humans search for Bigfoot identified but not conveyed in an appealing, entertaining, emotive way. Message is not clear or apparent No message

Final Production Production significantly increases audience knowledge and understanding of Bigfoot and the human interest in Bigfoot. Production increases audience knowledge and understanding of Bigfoot and the human interest in Bigfoot. Production only slightly increases audience knowledge and understanding of topic. Production doesnt increase audience knowledge and understanding of topic.

Padlet Assessment:

After your interview with the Bigfoot researcher, why do you believe humans search for elusive creatures, like Bigfoot? Explain. LESSON #2Developing Documentaries

I. DEFINE OBJECTIVES AND CONTENT

LESSON OBJECTIVEAfter analyzing the components of a documentary, the students will be able to build a storyboard for their Bigfoot documentary by following the guidelines of their storyboard rubric.

POINT TO PONDERDocumentaries challenge a persons preconceived viewpoints and ideas.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONWhat compels humans to search for undiscovered creatures, or cryptids?Why do filmmakers use documentaries to convey information?

CONTENTOutline the content you will teach in this lesson. I. DocumentariesA. Films or shows about real events and real people that usually involves political, historical, and social information1. Intended to instruct, persuade, enlighten, or inform2. Captures real-life situations3. Allows viewers to live vicariously through the information presentedB. Elements that comprise a documentary1. Direct Narration and voiceovers a. See and hear the narrator of the filmb. Impacts viewers emotionsc. Should offer authority yet familiarity for viewers and listenersd. Try to avoid long words and tongue twisters2. Interviews with an experta. May take place off screen or on screenb. Questions are asked the speakeri. Speaker delineates directly about the topic being addressed3. Photographsa. Location shotsb. Still shotsc. Long shotsd. Close-ups4. Film clips/action footagea. Verite footagei. Footage that captures real-lifeb. Thematic/symbolic footagei. Images or scenes that stand for something 5. Musica. Find music that correlates to the pace and content of the documentaryb. Add music to appropriate spots in the documentaryc. Used to impact the viewers emotions C. Ways to orchestrate and organize a documentary1. Storyboardsa. A script in visual form, sequencing the events in a film, television, or radio show using images and video clipsb. Each box in a storyboard represents a different scene in the filmc. Video (interview) footage or images will usually have audio, voiceovers, or text playing simultaneously to compliment the visualsd. Includes a beginning, middle, and endii. Includes dialogue or directionsiii. Includes where music will begin and end iiii. Includes where photographs and interview footage will be placed

II. PRE-PLANNING

What will students UNDERSTAND as a result of this lesson? How does this connect to the Essential Question? The students will understand different elements of documentaries: narration, point of view, structure, theme, and voiceovers.

The students will understand the aesthetic elements of documentaries, such as mood, photographs, and music.

The students will understand where to find public domain photographs. The students will understand how to orchestrate and build a storyboard by looking at premade storyboard detailing the information about what comprises a documentary.

By the students looking at a premade storyboard, discussions about the characteristics of documentaries, and storyboards, they will be able to take the precursor steps to showcasing why humans are interested in Bigfoot. They will be able to decipher how documentaries convey information in an intriguing, yet informative way.

What will students be able to DO as a result of this lesson?The students will be able to discuss and identify the elements that comprise a documentary.

The students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of why humans search for Bigfoot and the basic elements of documentaries when they start their storyboards. They will write their own narrations explaining the characteristics of Bigfoot. They will use the interview footage that conveys why humans search for Bigfoot. They will also include the visuals-photographs and interview footage-that connects to their narrations and voiceovers.

III. PLANNING

HOOKDescribe how you will grab students attention at the beginning of the lesson. BE CREATIVE.TIME: (5 minutes)Hook activity-Watch a short, succinct expert from the documentary Ancient Mysteries: Bigfoot

The students will use Padlet to discuss what they notice about the documentary. Each student will have a different component of a documentary to look for and analyze. They will each be given a card with the component they will look for: narrator, pictures, music, examples of stories, and voiceovers.

INSTRUCTIONExplain Step-by-step what you will do in this lesson. Be explicit about ties to Points to Ponder, Essential Question, and Interactions here. Include ALL support and teaching materials with your unit. TIME:

1. (5 minutes) Hook Activity- Hook activity-Watch a short, succinct expert from the documentary Ancient Mysteries: Bigfoot. The students will use Padlet to discuss what they notice about the documentary (narrator, pictures, music, examples of stories, voiceovers, etc.).

2. (20 minutes) The students will discuss and view a storyboard about the purpose and elements of a documentary. The students will see a completed storyboard and analyze how they are constructed. During the presentation, the students will also watch a documentary trailer entitled Bully, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1g9RV9OKhg. They will use a graphic organizer to answer the following questions while viewing. After the video, the students will participate in a think-pair-share to reinforce the elements of a documentary and explore the feelings and emotions embedded within documentaries: What effect did the images portrayed in this documentary trailer have on the video as a whole? What effect did the interviews portrayed in this documentary trailer have on this video as a whole? What effect did the music played in this documentary trailer have on this video as a whole? Did the people speaking in the video keep your attention? Why or why not? How did the watching this video make you feel? Why?

Connection to Point to Ponder and Essential Question: By answering questions about the documentary trailer Bully the students have use their critical thinking skills to deduce how images, interviews, and music can impact a documentary and viewers. They will have to extrapolate how the different elements of documentaries, such as narration, images, and music can drastically challenge their viewers opinions and feelings.

3. (5 minutes) Discussion about how documentaries are excellent ways for people to tell a story or convey information. The students will contemplate and discuss the following question: How can you use your interview to convey the human interest in searching for undiscovered creatures, such as Bigfoot?

4. (30 minutes) The students will use the storyboard that was used to show documentary elements to help make their own storyboard about Bigfoot and the human interest in Bigfoot. The students will receive a blank storyboard template where they can create their storyline for their Bigfoot documentary. The students will work in collaborative groups of 3-4 to create their documentaries.

The students will use an instructional guide located on our camp website to understand where public domain photographs for their storyboard and documentary can be found. (see Where can I find free public domain images and pictures handout below). This handout will be located on our website for students to see and use.

The students-using information they received during day 1 and their Bigfoot researcher interview-will include the following information in their documentaries:The attributes, or characteristics, of BigfootHistorical details about BigfootWhy do people search for Bigfoot?

Connection to Point to Ponder and Essential Question: The students will view a premade storyboard that shows the elements of a documentary and why documentaries are important. The storyboard will allow students to organize and interact, in a strategic way, with the characteristics and history of Bigfoot, as well as the human interest in proving Bigfoots existence. They will be able to see the step-by-step process of orchestrating and creating an effective documentary. Once they understand the elements of a documentary, they will be able to showcase why humans search for mysterious creatures, using their interview footage as a primary, indispensable source.

ASSESSMENT(Performance Task) What will the students DO to demonstrate that they have mastered the content? Be specific and include actual assessment with unit materials. TIME: 30 minutesThe students will learn how to orchestrate and build a storyboard. The students will receive a blank storyboard template where they can create their storyline for their Bigfoot documentary. The students will work in collaborative groups of 3-4 to create their documentaries.

The students-using information they received during day 1 and their Bigfoot researcher interview-will include the following information in their documentaries:The attributes, or characteristics, of BigfootHistorical details about BigfootWhy do people search for Bigfoot?

To accomplish this endeavor, the students will have to locate:Photos of BigfootCreate narration and voiceovers Bigfoot researcher Interview footage The students will follow the storyboard rubric and the Bigfoot documentary rubric presented in day 1 to help them build their storyboard.

DOES THE ASSESSMENT ALLOW YOU TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT THE STUDENTS HAVE MET YOUR STATED LESSON OBJECTIVE? YES OR NO

ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALSInsert ALL materials here including Assessments and Instructional Materials.Explicitly LIST any additional files for this lesson. Be sure that ALL materials have been submitted for this lesson.

Storyboard Presentation about the characteristics of a documentary

Storyboard rubric

Storyboard template

Public domain photographs handout

Bully documentary trailer questionsStoryboard Presentation about Documentaries

Scene Description: Introduce what a documentary is.

Dialogue: Welcome to the diverse world of documentaries! Documentaries are films or shows about real events and real people that usually involve political, historical, and social information. They are intended to instruct, persuade, enlighten, or inform.

Audio: Narrator of documentary saying the lines above.

Special Effects: Background of famous documentaries such as Supersize Me (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4N5i-0t8m94).

Transitions: A common way to show the information in documentaries is through interviewsVisual:

Scene Description: Types of Interview

Dialogue: There are two types of interviews that occur during a documentary: direct interviews and indirect interviews. Direct interviews are when the viewer both sees and hear the interviewer and the interviewee. Indirect interviews are when the viewer only hears the interviewee.

Audio: Voices of interviewer/interviewees in interview videos

Special Effects: Brief videos of types of interviews

Transitions: In addition to interviewers and interviewees, there is also typically a narrator.Visual:

Scene Description: The narrator

Dialogue: There are two types of narration in a documentary: direct narration and voiceovers. Direct narration is when the viewer can hear and see the narrator. Voiceovers are when the viewer can hear the narrator, but do not see him/her. Voiceovers typically are accompanied with some kind of image or video

Audio: Voices from videos

Special Effects: Brief sections of http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azR8i4KTeEE (cartoon voiceovers) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fprjhbFCNws (Ellen interview with Julia Roberts

Transitions: When focusing on interviews and narration in a documentary, it is also important to focus on camera angels since the documentary is seen through the cameras lenses.Visual:

Voiceover

Direct Narration

Scene Description: Camera Angles

Dialogue: There are several types of camera angles; however, some of the most popular camera angles while documentary filming are location shots, still shots, long shots, and close up shots. (Show examples to the write while saying this).

Audio/Special Effects: Voiceover with pictures (see visual) in background

Transitions: In addition to the visual, the auditory aspect documentary filmmaking is of the utmost importance.Visual:

Location Shot: On the movie set of Thor.

Still Shot: (Basketball in hoop still shot)

Long Shot: (Long shot of Hollywood Sign).

Close Up Shot: (Close up of water droplets on leaf).

Scene Description: Music

Dialogue: Music should correlate to the pace and content of the documentary and should be used to impact the viewers emotions.

Audio/Special Effects: View http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdK5FGeMS3kThis video shows one scene with various music. The students will examine how the type of music displayed in films effects the viewers emotions.

Transitions: Transition to credits.Visual:

Video located at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdK5FGeMS3k will act the audio and visual elements of this section of the film.

Bully Documentary Trailer

Directions: Please answer the following questions regarding the trailer of the documentary Bully. Please use as many specific details as possible from the trailer to support your answers.

What effect did the images portrayed in this documentary trailer have on the video as a whole?

What effect did the interviews portrayed in this documentary trailer have on this video as a whole?

What effect did the music played in this documentary trailer have on this video as a whole?

Did the people speaking in the video keep your attention? Why or why not?

How did watching this video make you feel? Why?

Where can I find free public domain images and pictures?Stock Exchangehttp://www.sxc.hu/In our opinion the best site to locate free stock photos. The site contains in our opinion the best site to locate free stock photos. The site contains thousands of free images that can be used. While many of the pictures are free some of the images do require written permission first.Google Images with usage rightshttp://images.google.com/Doing a search on Google Image search is a great way to find a lot of interesting pictures, but it used to be very time consuming to find what pictures you could use legally on your site. Thankfully Google now has an option to search images by usage rights. As seen below, under the Search tools (1.) and then Usage Rights (2.) are options to filter the search by pictures labeled for reuse, labeled for commercial reuse, labeled for reuse with modification, and labeled for commercial reuse with modification.

Wikimedia Commons http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_PageFantastic media repository that is part of the Wikipedia umbrella project where users are free to use any of the sites photos, audio, videos, and other media freely.Flickr: The Commonshttp://flickr.com/commonsA great feature from the popular photo sharing site Flickr where institutes such as The Library Of Congress, Powerhouse Museum, Brooklyn Museum, Smithsonian Institution, and various users can post and share images that have no known copyright restrictions.http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibraryA fantastic collection of scans from the British Library of over 11,000,000 public domain pictures. Microsoft Office free images and cliparthttp://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/Another great site that offers thousands of royalty free pictures and even clipart that are available for all users.MorgueFilehttp://www.morguefile.com/Another fantastic location to locate high resolution digital stock photography. The site offers thousands of free images almost all that have no restrictions or agreements attached. In addition the site requires no login to download the high quality files.U.S. Government Graphics and Photoshttp://www.firstgov.gov/Topics/Graphics.shtmlAnother fantastic site linking to other U.S. government sites containing hundreds of thousands free and public domain images linking to image categories such as Air Force, forests, animals, Army, birds, coast guard, crops, fish, fire, fruits, geology, Indians, lab research, mammals, money, mountains, NASA, Navy, parks, plants, Presidents, space, storms, veggies, volcano's, war, wildlife, and much more.

StockVaulthttp://www.stockvault.net/Another great site that contains thousands of free stock photography in a large variety of categories.Picdromehttp://www.picdrome.com/A great site that list several hundred photos in a about a dozen different albums.PD Photohttp://pdphoto.org/Another great collection of thousands free public domain pictures. This site contains one of the best collections of travel pictures from around the world.Pixabayhttp://www.pixabay.com/Simple, easy to use site with nearly 65,000 photos and illustrations. All of which may be used freely, without attribution and for any purpose.Liam's pictures from Old Bookshttp://www.fromoldbooks.org/A good collection of original pictures from old books that are no longer copyrighted and considered public domain. This is a great place to find obscure and unique pictures and illustration.WorldImageshttp://worldart.sjsu.eduCalifornia State University product that contains over 60,000 images around the world that can be used freely for non-profit and education use.

deviantARThttp://www.deviantart.com/Another fantastic site with not only photographs, but traditional art, digital art, stock images, and more. Keep in mind that this site contains both royalty free and copyrighted works. Make sure you view the artists or photographers usage guidelines and rules before using any image.

Credit to http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000845.htm

Bigfoot Documentary StoryboardDocumentary Title:Scene Description:

Dialogue/Narration/Voiceovers

Audio:

Special Effects:

Transitions:Visual:

Scene Description:

Dialogue/Narration/Voiceover:

Audio:

Special Effects:

Transitions:Visual:

Scene Description:

Dialogue/Narration/Voiceover:

Audio:

Special Effects:

Transitions:

Visual:

Academy Award WinnerOscar NomineeStraight to DVD

The storyboard is accurate and detailed. A suitable and appropriate script is provided (Script has a start, middle and finish). Scenes are detailed and the action is accurately described. There is Consistent detailed information about: Transitions between scenes Camera action, angles and shots Sound effects

Sketches are consistently accurate and show care and attention to detail. It is easy for a third party to understand the shot and flow of the advertisement

The storyboard is mostly accurate or detailed. A suitable script is provided (Script has a start, middle and finish) Most scenes are detailed and the action is described. There is detailed information about most of the following: Transitions between scenes Camera action, angles and shots Sound effects

Sketches are reasonable accurate It is relatively easy for a third party to understand the shot and flow of the advertisement

The storyboard contains some detail. A script is provided.(Script has a start, middle and finish) Most scenes have some detail and some action is described. There is information about some of the following: Transitions between scenes Camera action, angles and shots Sound effects

Sketches are included and have some accuracy. The Storyboard is understandable and has some flow

LESSON #3Filmmaking Fanatics

I. DEFINE OBJECTIVES AND CONTENT

LESSON OBJECTIVEStudents will demonstrate their understanding of documentary filmmaking and film equipment by finishing their Bigfoot storyboard and begin the filming of their documentary.

POINT TO PONDERKnowledge of technology is the only way to successfully pass along information.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONHow is learning to operate video equipment an essential skill in documentary filmmaking?

CONTENTOutline the content you will teach in this lesson. I. Ways to orchestrate and organize a documentaryA. Storyboards1. A script in visual form, sequencing the events in a film, television, or radio show using images, video clips, ect.2. Each box in a storyboard represents a different scene in the film3. Video (interview) footage or images will usually have audio, voiceovers, or text playing simultaneously to compliment the visuals4. Includes a beginning, middle, and enda. Includes dialogue or directionsb. Includes where music will begin and end c. Includes where photographs and interview footage will be placed

II. Elements that comprise a documentaryA. Music1. Find music that correlates to the pace and content of the documentary2. Add music to appropriate spots in the documentary3. Used to impact the viewers emotions

III. Technology planA. Flip Cameras1. Turning on and Offa. Button located on the top right hand sidei. Flick grey button twice to turn off2. Recordinga. Aim lens at subject and press the red buttoni. The timer will emerge in the top left hand corner of the view screenb. Press the red button again when finished recording3. Zoominga. The silver plus and minus buttons surrounding the red button4. Playbacka. Press the play button to the left of the red button on the screen5. Deletinga. Press the trashcan button on the right hand side of the red button6. Uploadinga. Pull the silver switch on the left hand side of the camera b. USB connector will emerge c. Plug the USB connector into the USB port on a computer

II. PRE-PLANNING

What will students UNDERSTAND as a result of this lesson? How does this connect to the Essential Question? The students will understand how a storyboard helps to build an informative, captivating documentary.

The students will understand how to operate video equipment, such as the flip cameras.

The information the students will understand as a result of this lesson directly correlates to the essential question because they will learn that their interactions with the flip cameras and laptops, in conjunction with learning how to use it properly are paramount in creating a captivating documentary.

What will students be able to DO as a result of this lesson?The students will be to create a storyboard about the attributes of Bigfoot, the history of Bigfoot, and the human interest in Bigfoot by using their interview with the Bigfoot researcher, photographs, and voiceovers.

The students will be able to operate a flip camera.

The students will be able to utilize their storyboards to start filming their Bigfoot documentary.

III. PLANNING

HOOKDescribe how you will grab students attention at the beginning of the lesson. BE CREATIVE.TIME: 7 Minutes

The students will view three photos. Each photo will have different music playing in the background. The students will have to decide if the music fits with the picture and why.

INSTRUCTIONExplain Step-by-step what you will do in this lesson. Be explicit about ties to Points to Ponder, Essential Question, and Interactions here. Include ALL support and teaching materials with your unit. TIME: Minutes

1. (7 minutes) Hook Activity- The students will view three photos. Each photo will have different music playing in the background. The students will have to decide if the music fits with the picture and why using a teacher generated graphic organizer. The students will discuss why is it important to have music that matches the content and emotion of the photograph using their graphic organizers.

3. (15 minutes) The students will finish orchestrating their storyboards about the history of Bigfoot, the attributes of Bigfoot, and why people feel compelled to search for Bigfoot. They will search for photographs of Bigfoot using the guide from day 2.

4. (10 minutes) After we discuss-the students will each receive a step-by-step guide-how to operate the Flip Cameras; the students will practice using them (see handout below).

Discuss how to operate a Flip Camera. Recording Zooming Pausing or stopping

Connection to Point to Ponder and Essential Question: The students interaction with technology relates to the essential question because students will not only be learning how to use the camera, but will also directly observe and interact with the cameras function and necessity in making a documentary film. The students will use teacher instruction, guides, and their own interactions to learn the functionality of the camera.

5. (10 minutes) The students will receive a handout on how to create, save, and edit documentaries in Movie Maker-the handout will be located on our camp website. The teachers will demonstrate how to use Movie Maker, and the students will have the opportunity to utilize Movie Maker before filming their documentary.

6. (28 minutes) The students will begin filming their Bigfoot documentary. They will use their storyboard as their script since their voiceovers and narrations will already be written. They will have voiceovers and narrations to coincide with photographs. They will use the interview footage to convey why humans search for elusive creatures like Bigfoot. They will utilize the elements of documentaries they learned about in day two, their storyboards, and their creativity to create an informative documentary about the background and human interest of Bigfoot. The students will work in collaborative groups of 3-4 to create and build their documentary. The students will have access to their Bigfoot documentary film footage on a jump drive.

Connection to Point to Ponder and Essential Question: The students will interact with the Flip Cameras and laptops to build an informative, intriguing documentary. In order for them to utilize the Flip Cameras proficiently, they first have to learn about the intricacies of the camera and how it operates. This knowledge will help them become effective documentary filmmakers. The students will hold the cameras and learn its function through the teachers help and instructional handout.

ASSESSMENT(Performance Task) What will the students DO to demonstrate that they have mastered the content? Be specific and include actual assessment with unit materials. TIME:

The students will complete their storyboard as a precursor to the filming of their documentary. The students will use the storyboard rubric introduced on day two to finish their storyboards.

DOES THE ASSESSMENT ALLOW YOU TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT THE STUDENTS HAVE MET YOUR STATED LESSON OBJECTIVE? YES OR NO

ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALSInsert ALL materials here including Assessments and Instructional Materials.Explicitly LIST any additional files for this lesson. Be sure that ALL materials have been submitted for this lesson.

Materials: Laptops and flip cameras

Matching pictures to music graphic organizer for the hook activity

Storyboard paper the students began on day two

Storyboard rubric

Flip Camera instructional step-by-step handout

Movie Maker handout

How to Use a Flip Camera Handout

Turning On and OffWhen youre holding the camera facing away from you, on the right hand side at the top there is a small grey switch that you can flick down. Just flick the switch and dont be surprised when it bounces back. You simply repeat this action to turn the camera off.

RecordingWhen recording a video, aim the lens at your subject and press the big red button in the center. The camera will start to record. To be sure that youre recording, the timer should appear in the top left hand corner of the view screen. You can zoom in and out using the plus and minus buttons. To stop recording all you need to do is press the red button again.PlaybackTo playback the video you just recorded, press the play button to the left of the red button. But if youve taken more than one video, to select the clip you want to watch, press the little arrows to the right and left of the red button. This will show each clip youve taken. Just stop at the one you want and press play.DeletingTo delete any excess clips, all you need to do is press the trashcan button on the right hand side of the red button. The latest clip will come up. If thats the clip you want to delete then press the trashcan again. If its not, press the arrow buttons you used before, to find the clip you want. Once that clip is on the screen, press the trashcan again to delete it.

UploadingTo upload your clips to a computer, look for a silver switch on the left hand side of the camera. You pull this all the way down, and a USB connector should pop out. When the USB connector is out, plug it into any USB port on your computer (for the less tech savvy, this means theres asloton the side or back of your computer where you can connect the camera. The correct slot will have a little diagram depicting a three forked cable. This might take you a while but no fear, you will find it!)

Credit to CreativeWorks

Academy Award WinnerOscar NomineeStraight to DVD

The storyboard is accurate and detailed. A suitable and appropriate script is provided (Script has a start, middle and finish). Scenes are detailed and the action is accurately described. There is Consistent detailed information about: Transitions between scenes Camera action, angles and shots Sound effects

Sketches are consistently accurate and show care and attention to detail. It is easy for a third party to understand the shot and flow of the advertisement

The storyboard is mostly accurate or detailed. A suitable script is provided (Script has a start, middle and finish) Most scenes are detailed and the action is described. There is detailed information about most of the following: Transitions between scenes Camera action, angles and shots Sound effects

Sketches are reasonable accurate It is relatively easy for a third party to understand the shot and flow of the advertisement

The storyboard contains some detail. A script is provided.(Script has a start, middle and finish) Most scenes have some detail and some action is described. There is information about some of the following: Transitions between scenes Camera action, angles and shots Sound effects

Sketches are included and have some accuracy. The Storyboard is understandable and has some flow

Bigfoot Documentary StoryboardDocumentary Title:Scene Description:

Dialogue/Narration/Voiceovers

Audio:

Special Effects:

Transitions:Visual:

Scene Description:

Dialogue/Narration/Voiceover:

Audio:

Special Effects:

Transitions:Visual:

Scene Description:

Dialogue/Narration/Voiceover:

Audio:

Special Effects:

Transitions:

Visual:

Three pictures used for the hook activity:

Play fast paced, heavy metal music

Play calm, tranquil music

Play happy, uplifting music

Hook WorksheetPicturesWhat is the picture of?What does the music sound like?Do the pictures and music go together?Why or why not?

Picture 1

Picture 2

Picture 3

Microsoft Movie Maker (May we please utilize your Movie Maker guide?)

Directions: As you create your products today, use the instructions below to help you manipulate images and video.

Opening movie maker and saving project Click on the Starttab on the desktop Click on Windows Movie Makerto open program Click File Click Save Project As Click desktop Click on File name and type documentary name Click Save

Importing and inserting images On the left side under Capture Video click Import images Click desktop Click File and find the location of where images are located Highlight all the selected images and click import Screen should be in storyboard/timeline view. To validate, click on the show storyboard/timeline in the middle of screen. Storyboard/timeline view shows a series of boxes at the bottom of the screen. Click on the images and drag them into the boxes in the preferred order. Images can be deleted by right clicking and selected the delete button

Adding Effects Transitions The movement between video clips and images Click Tools and then Transitions Find the Contents Pane and click play to see what a transition looks like before adding to the storyboard/timeline To add a transition, click Clip and then add it to the storyboard/timeline

Special Effects Select the video, image, or text Click Tools and then Effects Find the Contents Pane to view a special effect before selecting it To add the special effect, click clip and then Add to Storyboard

Editing To move video clips and images, click on it and drag to the new location on the storyboard/timeline To undo changes, find the arrow next to on the toolbar To Redo changes, find the arrow next to Redo on the toolbar To zoom in or out, click view, and then Timeline

LESSON #4Lights, Camera, Action!

I. DEFINE OBJECTIVES AND CONTENT

LESSON OBJECTIVEStudents will create, edit, and present their documentary films following the guidelines in the Bigfoot documentary rubric.

POINT TO PONDERIt is possible to persuade people that elusive creatures like Bigfoot exist.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONWhy do filmmakers use documentaries to convey information?

CONTENTOutline the content you will teach in this lesson. I. How to Use Movie MakerA. Opening movie maker and saving project1. Click on the Starttab on the desktop2. Click on Windows Movie Makerto open program3. Click File4. Click Save Project As5. Click desktop6. Click on File name and type documentary name7. Click SaveB. Importing and inserting images1. On the left side under Capture Video click Import images2. Click desktop3. Click File and find the location of where images are located4. Highlight all the selected images and click import5. Screen should be in storyboard view. a. To validate, click on the show storyboard in the middle of screen. b. Storyboard view shows a series of boxes at the bottom of the screen. c. Click on the images and drag them into the boxes in the preferred order.i. Images can be deleted by right clicking and selected the delete buttonC. Adding Effects1. Transitionsa. The movement between video clips and imagesb. Click Tools and then Transitionsc. Find the Contents Pane and click play to see what a transition looks like before adding to the storyboardd. To add a transition, click Clip and then add it to the storyboard2. Special Effectsa. Select the video, image, or text b. Click Tools and then Effectsc. Find the Contents Pane to view a special effect before selecting itd. To add the special effect, click clip and then Add to StoryboardD. Editing1. To move video clips and images, click on it and drag to the new location on the storyboard2. To undo changes, find the arrow next to on the toolbar 3. To Redo changes, find the arrow next to Redo on the toolbar 4. To zoom in or out, click view, and then Timeline

II. PRE-PLANNING

What will students UNDERSTAND as a result of this lesson? How does this connect to the Essential Question? As a result of this lesson, students will understand how to portray information through a documentary. The information the students will understand directly correlates to the essential question because we will guide the students to determine that, not only are documentaries strictly for information, but they also take the human experience and opinions of professionals and regular people into account. This, in turn, provides a video that displays well-rounded information.

What will students be able to DO as a result of this lesson?The students will be able to direct, film, and edit a documentary film about Bigfoot and why people search for the elusive creature.

III. PLANNING

HOOKDescribe how you will grab students attention at the beginning of the lesson. BE CREATIVE.TIME: 5-10 Minutes

The students will watch a small clip of Richlands High School weekly Wild Cuts video, found at https://onslow.eduvision.tv/Default.aspx. The students will discuss what they notice that is both good and bad about the video. The students will use Padlet to discuss their initial observations about how the editing techniques learned in day 3 would help in certain parts of the clip.

INSTRUCTIONExplain Step-by-step what you will do in this lesson. Be explicit about ties to Points to Ponder, Essential Question, and Interactions here. Include ALL support and teaching materials with your unit. TIME:

1. Video of Richlands High School Journalism class creating/editing their weekly Wild Cuts segment. Using Padlet, the students will write down and discuss how using the editing techniques learned in day 3 would help in certain parts of the Wild Cuts video.

2. The students will finish filming their Bigfoot documentaries using the Flip Cameras and interview footage with the Bigfoot researcher.

3. The teachers will go over the Movie Maker handout presented on day 3 with the students, and demonstrate how to use Movie Maker one more time. The students will then have the opportunity to use Movie Maker again before implementing the content for their documentary.

The point to ponder and essential question for this lesson encompasses the creation of the documentary. In this lesson, students are primarily creating and editing their documentaries to prepare them for the presentation segment of lesson. The students will be interacting with the camera, Movie Maker, the cryptozoology content they have learned about, the interview footage with the Bigfoot researcher. The students will also collaborate and interact with Microsoft Movie Maker after viewing a demonstration by the teachers and viewing a handout with screenshots.

ASSESSMENT(Performance Task) What will the students DO to demonstrate that they have mastered the content? Be specific and include actual assessment with unit materials. TIME:

Students will complete, edit, and present their documentaries using Microsoft Movie Maker (see rubric below). The videos will be displayed on our camp website. The videos might also be displayed by the Bigfoot Researcher to help promote the importance of searching for elusive creatures, like Bigfoot.

DOES THE ASSESSMENT ALLOW YOU TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT THE STUDENTS HAVE MET YOUR STATED LESSON OBJECTIVE? YES OR NO

ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALSInsert ALL materials here including Assessments and Instructional Materials.Explicitly LIST any additional files for this lesson. Be sure that ALL materials have been submitted for this lesson.

Storyboards

Flip Cameras, Laptops, and Microsoft Movie Maker

Documentary rubric

Microsoft Movie Maker Instructional Guide

Documentary Content Elements Rubric

Category4 (Great)3 (Good) 2 (Average)1 (Poor)

Overall effectiveness of film Film was effective, informative and appealing. Film was effective or appealing but not both. Film was not visually interesting. Did not convey information or compelling message. Not interesting or engaging

Effectiveness of Introduction Viewer was hooked from the beginning of the film by a strong opening that introduces the concept of cryptozoology. Viewer was fairly well interested by the introduction of cryptozoology Viewer had little reason to keep watching. Ineffective

Film Story All elements of the film were relevant to the overall theme. Events and messages were in a clear, sensible and well structured order to tell the characteristics and history of Bigfoot, along with the human interest in Bigfoot.Most elements of the film were relevant to the overall theme. Events and messages were mostly clear and in order to tell the characteristics and history of Bigfoot, along with the human interest in Bigfoot.Many elements of the film were irrelevant to the overall message. Viewer was not sure what the story was about. No real story structure

Indication of Thinking and Learning The teams clearly had an understanding of their task and subject of Bigfoot. Film showed creativity, high levels of team work and critical-thinking. Film terminology was well understood Film showed a basic command of the subject of Bigfoot, but lacked some creativity and thoughtfulness. There was little indication of team work imagination, creativity, research, and thoughtfulness in the film. No creativity or imagination used

Literacy Constructs media texts (images, text and sound) in a meaningful way to make meaning and to entertain. Partially constructs media texts to make meaning and to entertain Little entertainment in the way the media text was constructed Not entertaining

Appeal tThe message that humans have a reason for searching for Bigfoot is easily identified and conveyed in an appealing, informative, entertaining, emotive way There is a message about why humans search for Bigfoot identified but not conveyed in an appealing, entertaining, emotive way. Message is not clear or apparent No message

Final Production Production significantly increases audience knowledge and understanding of Bigfoot and the human interest in Bigfoot. Production increases audience knowledge and understanding of Bigfoot and the human interest in Bigfoot. Production only slightly increases audience knowledge and understanding of topic. Production doesnt increase audience knowledge and understanding of topic.

FILM-MAKING RESOURCE Created by Kym Nadebaum 2012

Microsoft Movie Maker

Directions: As you create your products today, use the instructions below to help you manipulate images and video.

Opening movie maker and saving project Click on the Starttab on the desktop Click on Windows Movie Makerto open program Click File Click Save Project As Click desktop Click on File name and type documentary name Click Save

Importing and inserting images On the left side under Capture Video click Import images Click desktop Click File and find the location of where images are located Highlight all the selected images and click import Screen should be in storyboard/timeline view. To validate, click on the show storyboard/timeline in the middle of screen. Storyboard/timeline view shows a series of boxes at the bottom of the screen. Click on the images and drag them into the boxes in the preferred order. Images can be deleted by right clicking and selected the delete button

Adding Effects Transitions The movement between video clips and images Click Tools and then Transitions Find the Contents Pane and click play to see what a transition looks like before adding to the storyboard/timeline To add a transition, click Clip and then add it to the storyboard/timeline

Special Effects Select the video, image, or text Click Tools and then Effects Find the Contents Pane to view a special effect before selecting it To add the special effect, click clip and then Add to Storyboard

Editing To move video clips and images, click on it and drag to the new location on the storyboard/timeline To undo changes, find the arrow next to on the toolbar To Redo changes, find the arrow next to Redo on the toolbar To zoom in or out, click view, and then Timeline

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