christopher mcqueen - my ux process 2014

Download Christopher McQueen - My UX Process 2014

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A detailed outline of my typical UX process that I've applied as a user experience (UX) designer and researcher over the last 10 years. My full UX lifecycle involvement includes: - Planning scopes of work within ‘Agile’ and ‘Waterfall’ development contexts. - Insight gathering through contextual inquiry methods, ethnographic research and observational studies. - User research through remote user testing, card sorting, concept testing and in-person product usability evaluations. - Facilitating workshops to analyse and synthesise research into meaningful product requirements, user journeys and personas. - Designing and iterating interaction designs and prototypes. - Supporting development teams throughout implementation, facilitating feature prioritization and creation of user scenarios. - Measuring success, tracking feedback and conversion rate optimization.

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  • Christopher McQueenMy user experience (UX) process

  • chris@user-solutions.com

    Im a user experience (UX) design and research leader. Im passionate about creating engaging and meaningful experiences for real people.

    My 10 years of experience spans agency and client-side teams across multiple domains including finance, entertainment, exhibitions, gaming, pharmaceuticals e-commerce and anymore besides.

    Up until September 2014, I was a Vice President within Deutsche Banks Global Transaction Bank. Here, I led a small team of UX designers and researchers.

    Ive worked with some incredibly talented teams in the last few years, working across mobile, tablet, desktop and kiosks. Some examples include supporting PayPals credit UX team, providing multi-channel UX design within Reed Exhibitions and usability consultancy for Betfair.

    About Me

    2

    My full UX lifecycle involvement includes:

    Planning scopes of work within Agile and Waterfall development contexts.

    Insight gathering through contextual inquiry methods, ethnographic research and observational studies.

    User research through remote user testing, card sorting, concept testing and in-person product usability evaluations.

    Facilitating workshops to analyse and synthesise research into meaningful product requirements, user journeys and personas.

    Designing and iterating interaction designs and prototypes.

    Supporting development teams throughout implementation, facilitating feature prioritization and creation of user scenarios.

    Measuring success, tracking feedback and conversion rate optimization.

    www.christophermcqueen.com

    chris@user-solutions.com

    @chrismcqueen

    +44 (0)7753 841690

    Website:

    Email:

    Twitter:

    Phone:

  • chris@user-solutions.com

    Strategy

    UX evangelism

    Planning (Waterfall / Agile)

    Prioritisation

    Content strategy

    Stakeholder interviews

    UX training

    Discovery

    Competitor analysis

    Content audit

    Analytics

    Surveys

    Contextual inquiry

    Card sorting

    Heuristic (expert) review

    Synthesis

    Personas

    Ideation and sketching

    Task / experience maps

    User journeys

    Sitemaps

    Wireframes

    Storyboards

    Prototyping

    Optimisation

    Usability testing (lab based)

    Usability testing (remote)

    A/B testing

    My process in brief

    3

    This document contains a small sample of the typical tasks and outputs Im able to provide throughout a UX research and design project.

    Whilst not exhaustive, the process I follow go a little something like this

    Phase

    Tasks

    Tools Whiteboard(s)

    Post-its (lots of)

    Markers

    MS PowerPoint / Keynote

    MS PowerPoint / Keynote

    Google Sheets / Survey Monkey

    Optimal Sort

    Markers, paper, more post-its!

    Balsamiq / OmniGrae

    Adobe CS

    Sketch / Invision App

    Axure RP

    HTML & CSS

    Camtasia / Silverback

    UserTesting.com

    Webex / GoToMeeting

  • StrategyUX evangelism Planning and prioritisation Content strategy UX training

    4

    4

  • chris@user-solutions.com

    Over recent years, evangelising UX to product teams and stakeholders has become an increasingly important and more frequent part of my daily work.

    Without exception, the teams I meet strive for a great user experience. However, its common amongst teams and business units for the definition and goals of UX to be muddled. Also, expectations around a UX projects execution using a robust research and design methods are often mixed.

    By simply explaining core research and design principles and providing a clear understanding of where these fit into a SDLC helps set the scene. The sooner in an engagement that this can be achieved, the better and more focused the end result.

    EXAMPLE: The examples on this page are taken from several dierent slide decks that I utilised whilst at Deutsche Bank.

    I provided regular overviews and updates to teams as to how UX fits into Agile and Lean approaches and the product development lifecycle.

    UX evangelism

    GTB Client Access Deutsche Bank GTB Deutsche Bank

    What is client centric design? We often simply refer to this as User Experience or UX

    2010 DB Blue template

    Users

    Business

    Technology

    UX

    Good User Experiences Focus on user needs and goals Meet our business requirements Perform within technical constraints By means of... Client interviews and observations Concept testing for direct feedback Constant iteration and validation

    In order to... Produce consistent, unified products Make our apps easy to use and intuitive Provide market-leading, best in class client experiences

    5

  • chris@user-solutions.com

    Early in the life of any UX project, planning is extremely important. It continues to be important throughout the development phase, particularly if working in an Agile manner.

    For a UX team, a solid plan helps the team allocate resources and focus on the most important features or deliverables for a given project.

    During the planning phase, its valuable to have a firm grasp on the relative prioritisation of the features to be specified and developed.

    Prioritisation can take many forms, but often workshops involving sizing activities, story point allocation and Kano modelling exercises.

    EXAMPLE: The example provided on this page was undertaken during my time with Deutsche Bank. It shows the outputs, in the form of an initial sprint planning board, from a collaborative planning session for a Trade Finance application.

    As UX Lead on the project, I was responsible ensuring the design was feasible for development whilst meeting business and user expectations.

    Planning and prioritisation

    6

  • chris@user-solutions.com

    Personally, Im a strong advocate of educating teams in user experience research and design techniques.

    I believe that by training people in research and design methods, the scope and reach of small UX teams in organisations can be broadened.

    By training product and technology teams, more insights can be gathered and richer feedback can be provided particularly in early project discovery and research phases.

    EXAMPLE: With Deutsche Bank, I created and recorded several presentations to facilitate Product Manager training in UX techniques.

    The course consistent of 3 parts moving from collecting data through client interviews, interpreting and analysing the resulting information, and finally collating this into meaningful outputs such as personas, task flows and design ideas.

    UX training

    7

  • chris@user-solutions.com

    For websites, content is the stu that actually gets users to visit. For products, services and applications the copy needs to be consistent and fit for purpose.

    Ordinarily, Id recommend that a content strategy and the resulting copy is left to the professionals.

    Good copywriters and strategists add a huge amount of value to any project. However, when content strategists arent available, it often falls to the UX designer to complete the copy requirements.

    EXAMPLE: This example was taken from an Intranet re-design built on SharePoint. The intention of this template and guidance document was to assist in the page content structure for the site. In this instance, product managers and and intranet team stakeholders used the template for primary pages. The completed templates were then distributed to teams who could then incorporate their own content and follow the guidance provided.

    Content strategies often fall out of content audits (covered later in this portfolio) but the planning of a solid content strategy is very important and needs to be considered early in the project.

    Content strategy

    8

  • DiscoveryHeuristic (expert) review Content audit Surveys Contextual inquiry Card sorting

    9

  • chris@user-solutions.com

    Heuristic reviews (often referred to as expert reviews) are a cost eective way of quickly identifying usability issues.

    Reviews can be used to evaluate existing websites, competitor oerings or prototypes. They can therefore be used early in a project to baseline the website or application youre creating, or towards the end to catch any small usability niggles on rapid turnaround projects.

    EXAMPLE This example from my work with Reed Exhibitions was conducted prior to a more in-depth review of the Exhibitor website homepages.

    To provide additional detail and support prioritisation of future feature development the issues that have been identified can be ranked and rated.

    In support of this prioritisation each issues best practise wireframes and interaction designs are often provided when more detailed fixes are required.

    Heuristic (expert) review

    10

    Client: Reed Exhibitions

    Project: Exhibitor homepage structure and layout

  • chris@user-solutions.com

    Content audits help determine what needs to stay and go when reorganising a site. Content auditing is a tedious and un-sexy job but you cant undertake a redesign of a content-heavy site without it.

    The main purpose of a content audit is to produce a listing of the sites content. From this list, you can determine the importance and priority of content, identify duplicates, relationships, and generally think about there overall structure before plugging ahead with a full site redesign.

    I typically record a content audit in a spreadsheet so theyre easy to share with other people on the team.

    EXAMPLE: The example provided is a snapshot of a fairly a short content audit