crisis management: are public transportation authority

Download Crisis Management: Are Public Transportation Authority

Post on 01-Nov-2014

1.762 views

Category:

Documents

2 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

 

TRANSCRIPT

  • 1. Crisis Management: Are Public Transportation Authority Leaders Prepared? Wanda F. Lester, Ph.D. Vereda J. King, Ph.D. Principal Investigators Urban Transit Institute Transportation Institute North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University B402 Craig Hall 1601 East Market Street Greensboro, NC 27411 Telephone: (336) 334-7745 Fax: (336) 334-7093 Internet Home Page: http://www.ncat.edu/~traninst Prepared for: U.S. Department of Transportation Research and Special Programs Administration Washington, DC 20590 January 2006 Final Report
  • 2. DISCLAIMER The contents of this report reflect the views of the authors who are responsible for the facts and the accuracy of the information presented herein. This document is distributed under the sponsorship of the Department of Transportation, University Research Institute Program, in the interest of information exchange. The U.S. Government assumes no liability for the contents or use thereof.
  • 3. 1. Report No. 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipients Catalog No. DTRS93-G-0018 4. Title and Subtitle 5. Report Date JANUARY 31, 2006 CRISIS MANAGEMENT: ARE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY 6. Performing Organization Code LEADERS PREPARED? 8. Performing Organization Report No. 7. Author(s) WANDA F. LESTER, Ph.D., VEREDA J. KING, Ph.D. 9. Performing Organization Name and Address 10. Work Unit No. Urban Transit Institute The Transportation Institute 11. Contract or Grant No. NC A&T State University DTRS93-G-0018 Greensboro, NC 27411 12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address 13. Type of Report and Period Covered US Department of Transportation FINAL REPORT Research and Special Programs Administration JANUARY 2004 TO JANUARY 2006 400 7th Street, SW 14. Sponsoring Agency Code Washington, DC 20590 15. Supplementary Notes 16. Abstract The events of September 11, 2001 shocked the world. For the citizenry of the United States, these events were life changing. The loss of human life, the destabilization of families, organizations, corporations, and industries by extreme and unforeseen circumstances destroyed confidences in the basic securities most people had come to take for granted. Private and public entities learned the meaning of the term crisis management and these entities learned that crisis management is a leadership issue. Public transportation services in New York and Washington, DC were immediately disrupted, but the public transit systems across the country and even globally face equal risks. The continuation of reliable, safe public transit services is vital for effective physical and economic community development, yet little is known about the response of transit authority leaders during crisis events. The current research begins a three-phased approach to understanding the willingness and capacity of public transportation leaders to champion, plan, and implement the tasks associated with effective crisis management. We posit the notion that crises are preceded by cognitive, organizational, and political factors that limit the implementation of effective policies and procedures to avoid critical response failures. In this first phase of the study, we examine the structural and organizational dimensions of Region 4 of the Federal Transit Administration, which comprises 69 transit authorities across eight southeastern states. This first-phase study concludes with procedural next steps to conclude the work through survey and on-site visits in phase 2, and collaborative leadership studies in phase 3. 17. Key Words 18. Distribution Statement Crisis effectiveness, crisis management, transit leaders 19. Security Classif. (of this report) 20. Security Classif. (of this page) 21. No. of Pages 22. Price UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 18 N/A
  • 4. TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ................................................................................... i Introduction................................................................................................1 Literature Review.......................................................................................3 Methodology ............................................................................................11 Conclusion ...............................................................................................15 Research Dissemination...........................................................................16 References................................................................................................17 Appendices
  • 5. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Crisis management requires leaders to respond to devastating events with boldness, clarity, and conviction. Crises occur in every walk of life and, while some garner the attention of the world, other events can be equally as destructive to a neighborhood, a community, a city, or even a region of a country. The events of September 11, 2001 shocked the world. For the citizenry of the United States, these events were life changing. The loss of human life, the destabilization of families, organizations, corporations, and industries by extreme and unforeseen circumstances destroyed confidences in the basic securities most people had come to take for granted. Private and public entities learned the meaning of the term crisis management and, more importantly, these entities learned that crisis management is a leadership issue. Public transportation services in New York and Washington, DC were immediately disrupted, but the public transit systems across the country and even globally face equal risks. The continuation of reliable, safe public transit services is vital for effective physical and economic community development, yet little is known about the response of transit authority leaders during crisis events. The current research begins a three-phased approach to understanding the willingness and capacity of public transportation leaders to champion, plan, and implement the tasks associated with effective crisis management. We posit the notion that crises are preceded by cognitive, organizational, and political factors that limit the implementation of effective policies and procedures to avoid critical response failures. In this first phase of the study, we examine the structural and organizational dimensions of 69 transit authorities from Region 4 of the Federal Transit Administration. These transit agencies represent eight southeastern states. This first-phase study presents foundation building research supporting i
  • 6. the need for an interdisciplinary leadership perspective when addressing immediate and smoldering crises. We then present summary information about the sample organizations selected from Region 4. The study includes only those agencies that have reported transit information to the National Transportation Database for at least two years and that maintain an operational fleet of busses. Phase One of the study concludes with procedural next steps to solicit and analyze survey data and to engage in face-to-face structured interviews with a sub-sample group of transit leaders in Phase Two. The final phase of the study, planned for June 2006, involves the introduction of a training seminar for transit leaders. The three-phased approach provides a complete view of the current status of the transit agencies with respect to crisis management preparedness and the learning that takes place over the period of study. ii
  • 7. CRISIS MANAGEMENT: ARE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY LEADERS P

Recommended

View more >