Cultivate Africa’s Future (CultiAF) - IDRC EN/CultiAF... · Cultivate Africa’s Future (CultiAF)…

Download Cultivate Africa’s Future (CultiAF) - IDRC EN/CultiAF... · Cultivate Africa’s Future (CultiAF)…

Post on 26-Jul-2018

212 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Page 1 of 19

    Cultivate Africas Future (CultiAF)

    Call for Concept Notes

    July 2013

    Canadas International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

    Australian Centre for International Agriculture Research (ACIAR)

  • Page 2 of 19

    Table of contents

    Background ................................................................................................................................................... 3

    1. Objectives and Focus of the Fund ......................................................................................................... 7

    2. Eligibility for the Fund ........................................................................................................................... 8

    A. Applicant Organisations and Research Location ............................................................................... 8

    B. Management ..................................................................................................................................... 9

    C. Type of Research ............................................................................................................................. 10

    3. Budget and Duration ............................................................................................................................... 12

    4. Selection Process .................................................................................................................................... 12

    5. Selection Criteria .................................................................................................................................... 13

    6. Target Timelines ...................................................................................................................................... 15

    7. Concept Note Format and Requirements ............................................................................................... 16

    8. Submission Deadline .............................................................................................................................. 16

    9. Permission to Share Information ............................................................................................................ 17

    10. IDRC Standard Grant Conditions ........................................................................................................... 17

    11. Country Clearance Requirements ......................................................................................................... 18

    Appendix A: CultiAF eligible countries .................................................................................................... 19

  • Page 3 of 19

    Background In 2012, the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) and the

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) of Canada announced a four year CAD 15

    million Cultivate Africas Future (CultiAF) partnership. The main objective of this competitive

    research fund (the Fund) is to support applied research in areas vital to achieving long-term food

    security with a focus on post-harvest losses, nutrition and water use in Eastern and Southern

    Africa.

    The Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) is part of the Australian

    Governments Official Development Assistance Program. ACIAR was established in 1982 to

    commission expert Australian and international agricultural research centres to carry out research

    projects in partnership with their counterparts in developing countries. ACIAR shares knowledge

    and technology with developing countries, to help poor farmers grow more food for their

    families on their small land holdings.

    The Australian International Food Security Centre (AIFSC) was established within ACIAR to

    accelerate the delivery of research innovations for food security. AIFSC will lead and fund

    ACIARs involvement in the CultiAF partnership. The AIFSC works through partnerships to

    achieve its goal of helping smallholder farmers and other poor households access sufficient,

    accessible and nutritious food, by providing a bridge between agricultural research innovations

    (technologies, policies and practices) and implementation.

    The International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is a Crown corporation created in 1970

    by the Parliament of Canada. IDRC builds the capacity of people and institutions in developing

    countries to undertake the research they identify as most urgent. It works with researchers as they

    confront contemporary challenges within their own countries and contribute to global advances

    in their field.

  • Page 4 of 19

    The Agriculture and Food Security program of IDRC supports research that generates new

    options for more equitable and productive agriculture, to improve food and income security

    among poor women and men in developing countries. It works with other organisations to

    develop and test innovations technological improvements, and better agri-food policies that

    promote sustainability so as to be truly effective, for current and future generations.

    IDRC will be responsible for the management and administration of the Fund, and establishing

    funding agreements with recipients according to IDRC rules, policies and procedures. IDRC

    will also monitor and liaise with the recipients receiving funding. Strategic decisions and

    governance of the partnership will be a collaborative effort between senior managers at ACIAR

    and IDRC.

    Rationale of the Fund

    Estimates of food insecurity and malnutrition indicate that Africa still has the highest proportion

    of undernourished people in the world. Research has considerable potential to improve the food

    security situation by identifying ways in which effective interventions can be undertaken.

    Investing in small-scale agriculture is one of the most effective ways to meet the food security

    needs of vulnerable populations especially women and children while building economic

    livelihoods. Three key factors to ensuring food security in Africa are: the need to improve post-

    harvest systems, deepening understanding of linkages between agricultural production and

    human nutrition, and improving water usage and management practices.

    Farmers throughout Sub-Saharan Africa have long suffered serious losses of their harvested

    crops and livestock. Recent estimates by the World Bank put the annual value of post-harvest

    losses in Sub-Saharan Africa at US$ 4 billion per year for grains alone. Research recently

    supported by IDRC demonstrates that: the magnitude of post-harvest losses varies considerably

  • Page 5 of 19

    across commodities and throughout the value chain; rigorous documentation of losses is

    extremely limited and most studies use ad hoc methods; post-harvest losses are almost

    completely unstudied in some countries; and there is some confusion between physical and

    economic losses and the implications for food security. There is, therefore, considerable scope

    for additional research to find effective ways of reducing post-harvest losses while increasing

    returns through product quality control, market segmentation, processing, and other forms of

    value addition.

    Systematic approaches linking food production and the nutritional and health needs of farmers

    and consumers are also under-researched. Most of the current interventions are focused on the

    quantitative and calorific dimensions of food security. Multi-dimensional nutritional approaches

    are largely under-addressed. The links between agriculture, nutrition and health, and the socio-

    economic dimensions that affect food supply and demand, require rigorous primary research

    along with system-wide approaches, as they hold the potential to accelerate positive health

    outcomes.

    Sub-Saharan Africas agricultural productivity is the lowest in the world, with poor water

    availability, access, and management being key factors that constrain output. Irrigation is under-

    developed in this region, but could, if well harnessed, potentially make a significant impact on

    food security. Agricultural production is high on the agenda of national governments, yet the

    existing irrigation schemes in the region have performed below expectations due to technical and

    governance problems, and water scarcity in key river basins. A recent study commissioned by

    the AIFSC indicated that irrigation development is thought to have reached just 20 per cent of its

    potential across the region and is considered a major strategy for adapting to climate change.

    Research to find more effective ways to utilize and sustainably manage rainwater and small scale

    irrigation programmes could dramatically raise agricultural productivity.

  • Page 6 of 19

    National and regional agricultural research organisations in Africa are conducting research aimed

    at the generation and uptake of demand-driven innovations. Some large national research

    systems (e.g. in Kenya, Ethiopia, South Africa, Tanzania) and sub-regional research

    organisations are demonstrating considerable capacity to lead collaborative research. The recent

    development of an African Agriculture Science Agenda should facilitate coordinated priority

    setting. New initiatives (i.e. Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa; the East African

    Agriculture Productivity Programme, Feed the Future, Grow Africa, etc.) are encouraging, but

    tend to focus more on the high potential breadbasket regions. This is understandable, but there is

    an urgent need to improve production, income, markets and nutrition in other areas with medium

    or even low potential because millions of food insecure people reside in those areas. This may

    require different technologies and solutions. Many initiatives also focus on staple crops, with

    fewer research resources directed at crops that diversify incomes and diet and provide vital

    micro-nutrients and proteins. They also could focus more on livestock that have products high in

    micro-nutrients and protein, and provide financial returns to tens of millions of Africans while

    also providing a host of other livelihood services (wealth storage, value addition, insurance,

    liquidity).

    The demographic transition underway in Africa coupled with rapid urbanization will require

    improved farm-to-consumer marketing systems. Product loss, quality deterioration, and food

    safety will increasingly become key research issues as more consumers are separated by distance

    from food production. Employment issues, job creation, migration patterns differentiated by

    gender and age, labour-saving and work improvement technology, and other similar factors will

    increasingly be inter-related to agricultural production research.

  • Page 7 of 19

    1. Objectives and Focus of the Fund

    The principle objective of the Fund is to improve food security in Eastern and Southern Africa

    by funding applied research in agricultural development. An expected outcome is an increase in

    high-quality scientific research with a focus on the adoption of existing and new research results

    to tackle persistent problems of food insecurity.

    The specific objectives are to:

    1. Support innovative and complementary applied research on post-harvest systems,

    nutrition and sustainable water use.

    2. Identify innovations and mechanisms for scaling-up in use of the most promising

    research results.

    3. Support and underpin national and regional agriculture and food security policies and

    programmes.

    By scale up in use it is intended that research will identify adoption pathways and actively

    involve the research end-users who are crucial in taking research findings to scale. Proposals

    that address under-researched and under-utilized agricultural activities will be given preference,

    as will those that exhibit a high potential for being scaled up. Given the crowded agenda in some

    areas of agricultural research in Africa, the Fund will seek to support complementary exploration

    and study where there is a solid research base, good absorptive capacity by national and regional

    African agricultural research systems, a favourable policy environment, and expressed need.

    Research will build on existing findings, gaps in research, and attention will be paid to the long-

    term sustainability and the potential uptake of the research beyond the life of the Fund.

  • Page 8 of 19

    2. Eligibility for the Fund

    A. Applicant Organisations and Research Location This Call is open to applicant organisations that will work individually or in partnership with

    others to carry out research in one (or more) of the eligible countries: Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya,

    Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Applicant

    organisations must be based in one of the eligible countries in Eastern and Southern Africa. They

    may work in partnership with Canadian or Australian organisations but this is not a requirement.

    Eligible organisations are considered to be those that have legal corporate registration in an

    eligible country. Applications must include an official letter of endorsement, signed by an

    authorised officer from each applicant organisation (more details about this letter can be found in

    the instructions document). Applicant organisations and teams will require considerable

    experience in both research for development and project management. The Fund actively

    encourages applications from a wide variety of research for development partnerships that are

    end-user driven, including public-private partnerships. Potential research users include a wide

    variety of private sector and non-academic entities such as small and medium enterprises,

    producer groups, and business associations. (See Section B and C for more information).

    International organisations (except United Nations organisations and members of the

    Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research [CGIAR centres]) are eligible to

    apply as applicant organisations provided that they have regional chapters or offices with

    appropriate legal status to operate and manage funds in the eligible countries where the research

    will take place. United Nations organisations and CGIAR centers receive significant Canadian

    and Australian funds via other funding windows and shall not apply to this Fund as applicant

    organisations. They may, however, be included in applications by other research teams, as third-

    party organisations.

  • Page 9 of 19

    IDRC will contract directly with successful applicant organisations. Successful applicant

    organisations will be permitted to develop contracts with third-party organisations for specific

    services. IDRC will not contract directly with third-party organisations. Applications that involve

    third-party organisations must clearly justify their involvement and explain their role(s).

    Note that third-party organisations are not required to be located in the eligible countries. The

    guideline for total third-party participation in a project is a maximum of 20% of the budget.

    In case of par...

Recommended

View more >