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Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer Banking Survey

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Page 1: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

Customer experience: innovate like a FinTechPart of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer Banking Survey

Page 2: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

IntroductionIn the past, banks competed largely on price, product and scale of the branch network. Banks with large branch networks won customers through convenience and visibility. Today, however, the main competitive front is customer experience, which combines those traditional elements with a new emphasis on simplicity and convenience of interactions across a variety of channels, responsiveness to consumer requests and a proactive approach to continuous engagement with customers — all aimed at helping consumers to increase their financial well-being.

Customer experience incorporates product and service innovation. What banks sell and how they deliver it are critical components of a quality experience. In this regard, experience speaks to the entire customer life cycle, as well as every step along individual customer journeys.

Findings from the EY Global Consumer Banking Survey confirm why banks are under intense pressure to master the customer experience:

• Increasing commoditization: customers increasingly see traditional banks as all the same. That’s not surprising, given that the products that banks offer and the way they deliver them to customers have changed very little during the last few decades with the exception of digital channels. Enhancing, personalizing and streamlining customer experiences will enable banks to differentiate themselves.

• New competition: FinTechs and other new market entrants have used superior experiences to capture significant market share in certain markets (such as China). These firms’ products are, at their core, similar to what traditional banks offer, but the way they offer them and serve customers is closer to the experiences offered by Apple, Amazon and other digital experience bellwethers. Traditional banks must fight back with better experiences, or expect further erosion of their customer base.

Even for the banks least vulnerable to competition (such as those with the best-known brands and strongest balance sheets), creating richer and more personalized customer experiences matter because that’s what customers expect, and even their traditional competitors will invest to develop such experiences to gain competitive advantage. In some markets, the biggest lenders today are almost certain to be the biggest lenders in 5 or 10 years, but the way in which they serve their customers will need to change dramatically if they are to retain key customer segments.

1 | Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech

Page 3: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

Robert Colwell Partner, Financial Services Ernst & Young — Australia

Anna Slodka Turner Director, Financial Services — Research and Comparative Analysis Ernst & Young — United Kingdom

Teresa Schrezenmaier Director — Strategy and Customer Ernst & Young — United Kingdom

David Ebstein Partner — EMEIA Head of Digital Financial Services Ernst & Young — United Kingdom

About the survey The EY Global Consumer Banking Survey set out to measure the state of banks’ relevance to consumers’ lives. More than 55,000 consumers participated in the survey, which was conducted in early 2016.

Practically, the changes that are under way now (and that are likely to become more prevalent in the future) include:

• Radical simplification of purchase, transaction and service customer journeys

• Truly end-to-end customer journeys, with fully integrated and coherent channels

• “One-click” processing for certain transactions in digital channels

• Advancements in the availability and effectiveness of self-service capabilities based on artificial intelligence

• Smart ATMs and kiosks that do more than simply dispense cash and take deposits

• Expanded hours for branches, including more weekend openings

• Simpler products that are easier to understand, rationalized product portfolios and more transparent pricing so customers are never overwhelmed with too many choices and always know what they are buying and why they are buying it

• The rise of banking ubiquity — core services embedded within digital personal assistants (e.g., Apple’s Siri or Amazon’s Alexa) or via smart home appliances and similar platforms

• Niche banks serving narrow slices of the market (e.g., teenagers, seniors, expatriates or frequent travelers)

• Open-source and white-label banking that enables any organization with a recognized brand and a large customer base to offer banking services

• Entirely new lines of business, partnerships or joint ventures that explore new product “territories” (e.g., business planning and networking), perhaps some that extend to nonfinancial areas and help people lead more secure lives

Such changes require that traditional banks not only think and act like FinTechs — understanding and even emulating their approaches — but also that they partner with FinTechs, collaborating and innovating with nimble, technology-led firms to create better outcomes for customers.

Better experiences are not exclusively about better software and technology. Cultural and human resources factors also matter. Banks will need to attract radically different skills and talent — and do so at scale. They must implement new organizational structures and foster a culture focused on innovation and customer centricity, through which staff are allowed and incentivized to innovate and the value of a superior experience is broadly recognized, in terms of both competitive differentiation and bottom-line impact.

Such a radical change in the way banks operate will not be easy to bring about, but it is critical for banks to compete successfully in a world where customer experience has become the primary competitive differentiator and non-traditional financial providers are offering customers simpler and compelling alternatives.

Peter Neufeld Partner, Head of Digital Customer Experience EMEIA Ernst & Young — United Kingdom

2Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech |

Page 4: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

Defining our terms: what customer experience means

Customer experience is a difficult term to define. According to the Harvard Business Review, customer experience is “the sum-totality of how customers engage with your company and brand, not just in a snapshot in time, but throughout the entire arc of being a customer.” As such, it incorporates all channels and interactions, products and services, information and content.

Forrester puts it even more simply, viewing customer experience as “How customers perceive their interactions with your company.” In this sense, experience is very closely intertwined with branding.

Fundamentally, customer experience refers to the ways in which banks engage with their customers. It can be described in the context of single interactions or as the sum total of all interactions and touch points over time. In the latter case, it is useful to think of customer experience in terms of the fulfillment of the brand promise — that is, customer experience is how banking brands are translated into touch points.

A strong experience will lead to greater effectiveness in attracting and retaining customers over time, encouraging them to expand the relationship and buy more products, and converting them into advocates. In banking, the idea is to create experiences that enable consumers to get what they want — starting with fast and efficient transaction processing, easy access to relevant information and personalized service — across channels, from ATMs, self-service kiosks and mobile apps to face-to-face interactions with branch tellers or calls into contact centers.

3 | Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech

Page 5: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

Key findings from the EY Global Consumer Banking Survey

A rising tide of consumer interest in nontraditional banks, including internet-only banks and FinTechs, has made its mark on the industry. Traditional banks still “own” the primary financial services provider (PFSP) relationship for most consumers, but their relevance has begun to taper because of eroding trust levels, evolving customer expectations and the emergence of credible alternatives.

Globally, 6% of consumers have already moved their primary relationship to new companies offering services and technology that are more straight-forward to use than traditional banks. The rate is even higher in emerging markets (Exhibit 1). Looking ahead, 4 out of 10 customers express decreased dependence on traditional banks and excitement for what new types of companies can provide (Exhibit 2).

Exhibit 1: Types of companies considered by consumers as their most important or PFSP

Exhibit 2: Attitudes toward new ways of managing finances (%)

I’m less reliant on established financial services companies and banks these days, as there are more options to self-manage my finances.

I’m excited about the emergence of new online-only providers that compete with traditional banks.

A bank (with branches or internet-only bank without branches)

New company with different services

Other financial services company

Nonfinancial services company

Another type of company

85%86%

6%

4%5%

3%5%

1%1%

2014*

2016

41

38

174

41

40

163

Disagree/strongly disagree

Neither agree nor disagree

Strongly agree/agree

Don’t know/not applicable

US 3% UK 3% Germany 2% Singapore 6% Hong Kong 12% Indonesia 11% India 11% Brazil 10%

US 86% UK 92% Germany 84% Singapore 86% Hong Kong 77% Indonesia 74% India 76% Brazil 78%

*Data for 2014 does not show 3% from credit unions, cooperative banks, microfinance companies and others.

4Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech |

Page 6: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

While the industry has long been aware of the threat of FinTechs, consumer migration to nonbank players is accelerating and usage is high.

• Forty-two percent of consumers state that they have used an online/mobile-only nonbank financial product or service in the last year.

• Twenty-one percent have not used such a firm but would consider doing so in the future.

• Emerging markets eclipse developed economies in terms of using FinTechs, with China, Brazil and India leading the way.

• Consumers in a number of developed markets are lagging, but it is not hard to see how increasing awareness of FinTech could drive FinTech adoption in these mature markets.

• Rates of FinTech adoption will be explored in more detail in EY’s FinTech Adoption Index 2017.

The seemingly small and incremental gains new players have made in the last few years are now reaching a critical mass, largely because they have set new standards for innovation and customer experience. Further gains by such firms will continue to reshape the competitive landscape. Consider that 41% of consumers say that they would change financial services providers if a different one offered a better experience. Only 23% disagreed with that statement. This openness to switching is, of course, most applicable to digitally savvy customers, who represent approximately half of the customer base, as highlighted in a previous article in this series (Understanding: the key to customer loyalty). Digitally savvy but financially non-savvy consumers, the most competitively vulnerable segment, stand to benefit most from banks that can provide better guidance and a richer experience via digital channels (Exhibit 3).

Consumer interest in FinTechs and digital-only providers extends to many product categories. Out of 13 products we asked about, only 4 (checking, savings, personal loans and mortgage) were cited by at least of 50% consumers as one for which they would consider only traditional banks as providers.

Exhibit 3: Lack of differentiation

“I would not hesitate to change my financial services provider if I found one with a much better online/digital offer/experience” (%)

By savviness segment (%)

2

41

34

23

47

27

1

25

Dig savvy, Fin savvy (“pros”)

Dig non-savvy, Fin savvy

(“financial stars”)

Dig savvy, Fin non-savvy

(“digital stars”)

Dig non-savvy, Fin non-savvy

(“traditionalists”)

28

34

2

36

55

29

1

15

29

43

3

25

Disagree/strongly disagree

Neither agree nor disagree

Strongly agree/agree

Don’t know/not applicable

5 | Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech

Page 7: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

Better customer experiences drives switching to new innovative providers So what’s driving the increased excitement about FinTechs and the increasing indifference toward traditional banks? A clear sense that most banks are perceived as highly similar is one of several factors. Nearly two-thirds of consumers perceive little or no differentiation of products and services across the overall banking sector, a situation that has created an opening for nontraditional players through the promise of a better experience. Outside of fee and rate considerations, consumers cited several reasons — all related to the quality of customer experience — to switch to nontraditional providers (Exhibit 4).

Exhibit 4: Most important reasons to consider an online or a mobile nonbank provider (%)*

More attractive rates/fees

Better online experience and functionality

Access to different products and services

Easy to set up an account

Better quality of service

24

21

21

21

16

Consumers are becoming increasingly comfortable with online-only financial services providers. Nearly 40% of respondents and 52% of the most digitally savvy consumers described themselves in this way. Progressively sophisticated digital tools mean more consumers are comfortable managing multiple relationships with financial services providers. In fact, more than 75% of customers hold products or services with at least three providers, and more than 25% with at least four. Seventy-one percent of consumers believe technology has made it easier to have products across multiple financial providers.

Collectively, these findings form a stark equation: curiosity and excitement about banking options combined with increasingly robust and sophisticated digital tools mean banks are increasingly at risk of customers voting with their feet.

The situation may seem even more dire considering that banks are viewed as falling behind in providing easy-to-use digital solutions, particularly by digitally savvy consumers (Exhibit 5). As FinTechs and brands in other industries continue to enrich and mature their offerings and the overall experience, this perception is likely to increase. Banks are, in particular, missing an opportunity with digitally savvy but financially non-savvy consumers (i.e., digital stars); this segment is currently disengaged with banks’ digital channels because banks often fail to provide the quality advice and guidance these consumers need. This segment is the most likely to consider nonbanks.

*Respondents could choose more than one option.

6Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech |

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Financial starsComfortable with financial

self-management, but don’t particularly favor using digital channels

Digital starsPrefer to manage

many aspects of their life with digital

technology

ProsBoth digitally and financially savvy

Dig

ital

mat

urit

y

Financial maturity

TraditionalistsLeast in control of finances, and least

comfortable transacting online

Savvy

Notsavvy Savvy

Disagree or strongly disagree with this statement: “I’m confused about all of the different financial products/services

available these days.”

Agree or strongly agree with this statement: “I prefer to manage as many aspects of my life via digital channels as possible.”

Exhibit 5: Customer segments

7 | Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech

Page 9: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

Banks must also recognize that digital is only one channel consumers consider as essential to a great experience. All channels remain relevant to significant portions of consumers. The challenge in optimizing the channel mix is underlined by the views of younger consumers who place higher importance than older demographics on both the digital experience being

delivered and the business’s physical presence when researching or purchasing new products and services. Similarly, 62% of survey respondents agreed that being able to switch easily and seamlessly between different ways of interacting with a bank is important (Exhibits 6 and 7).

Exhibit 6: The many dimensions of experience (%)

Exhibit 7: Factors influencing the decision to take up a financial product/service with a new type of company

It’s important to be able to switch easily between different ways of interacting with a bank.

I’m happy to research products and transact online, but to take up a new product or get advice, I need to be able to visit a branch or call a real person.

The only time I would need to speak to a person at my bank is if its online services are not good enough.

8 14 23Strongly agree/agree

Neither agree nor disagree

Disagree/strongly disagree

Don’t know/not applicable

2725

2762 59

48

3 2 2

3

65

30

22

60

34

4

18–24 years

25–34 years

35–49 years

50–64 years

65+ years

64 62 58 58 56

18–24 years

25–34 years

35–49 years

50–64 years

65+ years

67 70 68 63 67

A great digital experience (%)A physical presence (%)

Extremely/very important — by age (%) Extremely/very important — by age (%)

Not at all

Moderately/slightly important

Extremely/very important

Don’t know/not applicable

8Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech |

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What banks get for providing better experiencesThe relationship between experience, trust and engagement can be seen in consumer attitudes to sharing more personal information, a proxy for deepening the relationship with their banks. The survey results show that 36% of customers would provide more personal information if it meant that banks could anticipate their needs better; only 29% of consumers disagreed with that proposition. Interestingly, consumers in China (62%) and Nigeria (67%) are the most willing to share more personal information than they do currently, while those in Japan (20%) and Russia (20%) were the least willing.

Experience in a broader context Banks are forced to compete with FinTechs and are naturally compared with other companies that set the standards for convenient and transparent experiences, including Amazon, Apple and Netflix. Banks can try to adopt a “digital-first” mindset and shift customers to digital channels, but many consumers still want personal interactions when they have questions or are considering a new product.

While the survey results suggest that banks are not expected to be as sophisticated as Amazon or eBay, customers would like banks to emulate some features, especially a simplified and tailored purchase and service experience. Ironically, digital customers find that banks are lacking in digital capabilities, while branch users feel pushed toward digital channels. This suggests that bank offerings and cross-channel experiences are not yet sufficiently tailored to customer needs.

Digital may not be everything to all consumers, but it is critical and often the most competitive battlefront. Few technological barriers remain to prevent banks from offering sophisticated and personalized 24/7 services through the channels consumers are already using. Thus, traditional banks must enhance their online and mobile experiences or risk losing further ground to FinTechs and other new players. The first step is for banks to understand better the gaps and shortfalls in the experiences they offer on a product-by-product level, from both customer and internal perspectives.

As highlighted in our earlier report, Understanding: the key to customer loyalty, banks should not take comfort in the fact that digital leaders are most at risk because they have the most transient customers.

Banks must continually innovate to protect market share and provide quality experiences for all customers. Consider the significant portion of banking customers with little or no interest in digital: a niche bank could differentiate itself and seize a growth opportunity by offering comfortable experiences for this segment. Larger, traditional banks will need to balance digital and human-supported channels in ways that best reflect their current and target customer base, operating model and long-term strategy.

Banks have natural competitive advantages over FinTechs and other new entrants, but they must learn from FinTechs when it comes to customer experience. Emulation may be the shortest path for banks to get better. Yet, how should this be done?

Actions banks should take to innovate like FinTechs and enhance the customer experience1. What needs to be done to provide better customer

experiences:

• Transform customer journeys

• Radically simplify product portfolios, product features and pricing

• Broaden services and expand into new “territories” to create an ecosystem of value-added services — including nonfinancial services

2. What needs to be done internally to enable those better experiences:

• Form partnerships to deliver a broader ecosystem of services and offerings, and define which parts of that ecosystem want to do so

• Structure the organization, build the talent base and shape the culture to drive innovation

• Collaborate with FinTechs to deliver better outcomes for customers

Transform customer journeys

Better customer experiences start with deep knowledge and understanding of why and how customers interact with the bank over time — the so-called “customer journey.” Effective journey maps chart all channels and touch points, of course, but may also take into account motivations and emotional factors.

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Page 11: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

The entire organization must be involved if banks are to become truly customer-centric. Marketing teams typically have a large and leading role to play in terms of designing and executing strong customer experiences, but customer centricity should not be the responsibility of any one single function. Banks should form cross-functional teams with broad representation from innovation groups, product development, and sales and service teams. IT and operations leaders must also be actively engaged and focused on promoting and supporting customer centricity by addressing legacy technology and operational barriers that make it difficult to drive change quickly.

Customer needs and expectations should drive the experience design, not outdated IT processes or legacy organizational structures. In this sense, traditional banks should emulate FinTechs — which begin with a “clean slate” in seeking solutions for consumers. Such a fresh start can set a clear and simple vision for the customer experience, even if it takes coordinated and broad-based efforts to make the vision a reality. Product and service design by cross-functional teams, informed by direct customer inputs, is another proven strategy for transforming the customer journey.

Radically simplify product portfolios, product features and pricing

Given rising customer expectations for simple and intuitive experiences and pricing transparency, banks must address their products. The first step is to make all offerings simple and transparent. From the first encounter (e.g., research about new products), customers must understand the value banks provide, what products cost and how they work, and the service level to be expected.

Here again, FinTechs offer inspiration to traditional banks — specifically in how they address discrete and well-defined problems in a personalized fashion (e.g., helping millennials design savings plans to buy a home or meet other goals). Increased transparency may also be worth emulating; it is common on the websites of “robo-advisors” for minimum investments and exact fees to be spelled out prominently in large and bold type, with clear explanations of potentially confusing terms. Simple steps such as these help to make banking easier and more convenient, which will enhance the ability of traditional banks to compete with new players delivering similar products in the context of simpler experiences.

Creating distinct propositions through customer centricity and service designAs results from the EY Global Consumer Banking Survey confirm, banks run the risk of becoming less relevant in their customers’ financial lives unless they make strategic and tactical changes to address changing consumer behaviors and needs. An evolving competitive digital landscape also requires retail banks to become more customer-centric in how they design products and services.

1. Focus on customer insight and co-creation: engaging customers through initial research, co-creation sessions and concept testing is critical to design experiences that meet their needs. Weekly engagement with customers in the design and development process can create exceptional results. Access to customer insights and validation throughout the design process allow teams to identify unmet needs and build a richer model for customer behavior across segments.

2. Measure behavior change in customers: analytics can provide insight into how consumers use digital channels and engage with products and services. Analytics must be tied to behavior through qualitative research. For example, variations in the frequency and pattern of “check-balance” events on a mobile banking app may indicate additional financial need, but that need can only be validated by linking quantitative patterns to insights from qualitative research. Such behavioral changes can be useful in refining specific steps on end-to-end customer journeys.

3. Start small, pivot quickly and prepare for scale: banks must also learn to assess success rapidly, enrich and mature the experiences they offer continually, and scale what works. Senior leadership is necessary to instill this new, more agile way of working. A development environment that supports rapid prototyping and customer testing is another requirement.

4. Help people make better financial decisions: banks should design experiences that help people make better financial decisions — for themselves and for the people that matter most in their lives — based on empathy. In seeing beyond purely transactional relationships, solutions should be designed to help customers navigate their complex financial lives. Banks will benefit from strengthened loyalty and may attract new customers as they offer products, channels and entire experiences that are clearly oriented to customer needs.

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Broaden services and expand into new “territories” to create an ecosystem of value-added services — including nonfinancial services

Simplifying product portfolios does not preclude the expansion or extension of the core banking value proposition into new areas beyond traditional product and transaction sets. For instance, the survey results indicate strong customer demand for better information on the tax consequences of banking products. Traditionally, there have been red lines around the limited tax support that banks offer customers, but the new competitive environment demands rethinking in this area, especially because additional services that meet consumer needs will almost certainly increase their “stickiness,” or loyalty, to the bank.

Other promising territories may include:

• Education around retirement savings, college tuition savings or buying a home

• Business planning, consulting services, networking and market intelligence services for small and medium-sized companies

• Predictive analytics services that rely on artificial intelligence or machine learning to provide real-time account analysis to customers and featured recommendations or timely alerts

• Consideration of ways to interact with customers through new “platforms,” such as digital assistants

• Special offerings for narrowly defined customer segments (e.g., teenagers, retirees, expatriates, frequent travelers)

• White-label banking initiatives through partnerships with well-known brands or companies with large, captive customer bases

These offerings must be developed and launched with customer-centric experiences in mind. The “what” of the product, the “how” of the channel and the “why” of the value proposition must be carefully combined. A clear sense of purpose for a bank — increasing the financial well-being of all of its customers — can provide a filter for deciding which new territories are the most promising.

Substantive ongoing dialogue with customers about their needs is also important to home in on the best ideas for new offerings, as are “crowdsourcing” programs. In this sense, banks may come to see their customers as an underexploited asset and hidden catalyst for innovation. The key is that banks should strive not just to position themselves as a valued partner to customers, but actually assume that role fully in everything they do. Their purpose should extend beyond efficient transaction processing, and they should seek to help consumers to make better financial decisions and improve their financial well-being.

Form partnerships to deliver a broader ecosystem of services and offerings — and define which parts of the ecosystem to own

In the future, the evolution of channels will continue to change ways in which banks produce and deliver products. Banks will be well served by forming partnerships and collaborating with FinTechs to expand the ecosystem of their offerings.

Furthermore, banks must decide which parts of the ecosystem they will own. Simply providing a balance sheet, but not owning the services or platform, could lead to the erosion of customer relationships, which could undercut the relevance and value of the bank to consumers. A similar situation occurred with telecommunication providers a decade ago.

On the other hand, banks do not need to provide all products and services on their platform and can rely on partners for the provision of parts of the product set. Banks will likely face some hard choices and difficult questions in the years ahead:

• Given the ubiquity of consumer access to information and online services, must the banks always directly and exclusively own every customer relationship?

• Should banks develop their version of Siri or Alexa?

• Which banking services could most easily be repackaged and offered through other platforms (such as e-commerce sites or technology providers)?

• What is the role of banks as payments are digitized and hardware makers seek to become an intermediary between customers and their banks?

Making conscious choices early is the best way for banks to be on the front foot, successfully transform their business model and preserve their value.

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Page 13: Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech - EY · PDF fileCustomer experience: innovate like a FinTech Part of a series of articles exploring key themes from the EY Global Consumer

Structure the organization, build the talent base and shape the culture to drive innovation

To design and deliver first-rate customer experiences, banks will need to transform their workforce. Just as they rethink their technology, banks must also rethink how they attract, engage, develop and inspire their talent. Financial institutions that win in the market five years from now will look very different from the organizations we know today — and that difference will be driven by people and teams, as much as it is by technology and data.

One driver necessitating a new approach to talent is that many simple teams are becoming automated. Thus, teams increasingly need to be cross-skilled and focused on collaboration of lines of business and organizational functions. Multidisciplinary skill sets will be at a premium. Specifically, banks should look for:

• Technical and creative skills around customer experience (CX) and user experience (UX)

• Entrepreneurial mindsets and self-motivation

• Innovative problem-solving, especially relative to customer needs

• Collaboration within diverse teams, including external groups

Dynamic, flexible working environments and self-governing teams will likely be the hallmarks of tomorrow’s strongest banking cultures. In seeking to drive change, some banks have experimented with incubator models or created internal innovation labs that are responsible for bringing employees from different parts of the bank together to develop ideas for innovation, assess the feasibility of various options and even create implementation plans. Other banks choose to collaborate directly with third parties, including FinTechs, to discuss ideas, evaluate new technology developments and then make decisions as to whether they are the right fit for their bank before implementing them.

Collaborate with FinTechs to deliver better outcomes for customers

For traditional banks, innovation can be accelerated through collaboration with FinTechs. While FinTechs were initially seen as threats to banks (and some genuinely are), we believe that banks and FinTechs will increasingly collaborate. The new competitive landscape requires a new approach to engagement with such firms.

Banks that have begun the process have explored a number of approaches, including the creation of focused teams and programs to scan the market continually, monitor FinTechs and other new market entrants, collect ideas and applicable practices from other sectors, and examine ways to implement them within the realm of existing operations, be it through emulation or partnership.

Acquisition of new players, including FinTechs, is still another option for gaining access to innovative ideas, technology and talent. Banks that take the M&A route may be able to capture a new market or service area quickly, launch new products or enhance the customer experience greatly.

Whatever the precise form it takes, FinTechs will increasingly be the innovation engine for the banking industry.

Winning through customer experience in a new worldThe imperative to offer a great customer experience reflects the fundamentally new world in which banks operate. Efficient digital transactions are the new benchmark for convenience, even as banks seek to rationalize their branch networks in response to cost pressures. Poorly designed digital channels may have helped erode trust and confidence in digital banks, while shrinking branch networks may have hurt perceptions of convenience among some customers. At the same time, FinTechs have won over new customers by providing convenience and building trust — the historical strengths of traditional banks. There is no doubt that whether banks can learn to act like FinTechs and master the many different manifestations of customer experience will play a major role in deciding how the next era of retail banking plays out.

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Bill SchlichGlobal Banking and Capital Markets LeaderErnst & Young — [email protected]+1 416 943 4554

David EbsteinPartner, EMEIA Head of Digital Financial Services Ernst & Young — United [email protected]+44 20 7951 5239

Jan BellensPartner, Global Banking and Capital Markets Emerging Markets and APAC Leader Ernst & Young — Singapore [email protected]+65 6309 6888

Anna Slodka-TurnerDirector, Financial Services — Research and Comparative Analysis Ernst & Young — United [email protected]+44 (0) 20 7951 9491

Teresa SchrezenmaierDirector, Financial Services Advisory — Strategy and Customer Ernst & Young — United [email protected]+44 20 7022 9285

Imran GulamhuseinwalaPartner, EMEIA and Global FinTech LeadErnst & Young — United [email protected]+44 (0) 7770 793 113

James LloydExecutive Director, Asia-Pacific FinTech LeaderErnst & Young — Hong [email protected]+852 28499340

Matt HatchPartner, Americas FinTech LeadErnst & Young — United [email protected]+1 415 894 8219

Africa Marius Van Den BergPartner, Financial Services — Africa Ernst & Young — South Africa [email protected]+27 11 772 3706

ASEAN Nam Soon LiewEY ASEAN Financial Services Managing Partner Ernst & Young — [email protected]+65 6309 8092

Australia and New Zealand

Robert ColwellOceania Financial Services PartnerErnst & Young — Australia [email protected]+61 2 8295 6416

Brazil Francisco Aranda Partner, Financial Services Advisory Ernst & Young — [email protected]+55 11 2573 3237

Canada Greg W. Smith Partner, Financial Services Advisory, Customer LeaderErnst & Young — Canada [email protected]+1 416 943 4593

Paul BattistaPartner, Financial Services Advisory LeaderErnst & Young — Canada [email protected]+1 416 943 3820

China and Hong Kong

Patrycja OselkowskaExecutive Director, Performance Improvement, AdvisoryErnst & Young — Hong Kong [email protected]+852 9668 1950

Denmark Lars Schwartz-PetersonPartner, Banking and Capital Markets Ernst & Young — [email protected]+45 2529 3246

Finland Antti HakkarainenPartner, Financial Services Advisory Ernst & Young — [email protected]+358 4 0592 4433

France Pierre PilorgePartner, EMEIA Financial Services AdvisoryErnst & Young — Advisory [email protected]+33 1 46 93 59 79

Germany Ulrich TrinkausPartner, EMEIA Financial Services Advisory Ernst & Young — [email protected]+49 6196 996 25173

EY global contacts

EY FinTech contacts

EY country/regional contacts

13 | Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech

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Greece Georgios Papadimitriou, CFA, FRM, PRMFinancial Services Industry Leader — Greece and Central and Southeast EuropeCFA, FRM, PRM- Ernst & Young — Greece [email protected]+30 21 0288 6596

India Murali BalaramanPartner, Financial Services AdvisoryErnst & Young — India EYPL [email protected]+91 22 6192 0490

Ireland Colin RyanPartner, Financial Services — Performance ImprovementErnst & Young — Ireland [email protected]+353 1 221 1505

Italy Fabio GasperiniPartner, Financial Services Advisory Leader Ernst & Young — Ernst & Young Financial Business Advisors [email protected]+39 06 6753 5203

Japan Koichi IwasaExecutive Officer/Managing Director, Financial Services Advisory [email protected]+81 3 3503 1100

Mexico Daniel R. LevitesPrincipal, Financial Services Advisory Ernst & Young LLP United [email protected]+1 212 773 5982

Netherlands Robert-Jan HagensPartner, Financial Services Advisory Ernst & Young — The [email protected]+31 88 407 2119

Norway Anders AndenaesExecutive Director, Financial Services Ernst & Young — [email protected]+47 9222 2293

Romania Aurelia CostacheFinancial Services Advisory Leader Ernst & Young — [email protected]+40 744 655 830

Russia Thomas MartinPartner, Financial Services Advisory Ernst & Young — [email protected]+7 495 660 4887

Saudi Arabia (GCC)

Paul SommerinPartner, Financial Services — Middle East and North Africa Ernst & Young — United Arab [email protected]+971 4 7010954

Singapore Jan BellensPartner, Global Banking and Capital Markets Emerging Markets and APAC LeaderErnst & Young — Singapore [email protected]+65 6309 6888

Li-May Chew, CFAAssociate Director, APAC Banking and Capital Markets Ernst & Young — [email protected]+65 6340 2774

Spain Arturo DerteanoPartner, Financial Services AdvisoryErnst & Young — Spain [email protected] +34915727960

Sweden Henrik HilbertsPartner, Financial Services Ernst & Young — [email protected]+46 8 5205 9878

Switzerland Adrian Widmer Swiss Lead Banking & Capital Markets Ernst & Young — [email protected]+41 58 286 4610 Olaf ToepferSwiss Lead Wealth and Asset Management Ernst & Young — [email protected]+41 58 286 4471

Turkey Gokhan GumusluSector Leader, Financial Services — Performance Improvement and AdvisoryErnst Young Kurumsal Finansman Danismanlik A.S. [email protected]: +90 212 408 5361

United Kingdom David EbsteinPartner, EMEIA Head of Digital Financial Services Ernst & Young — United [email protected]+44 20 7951 5239

United States Heidi BoylePrincipal, Financial Services AdvisoryErnst & Young LLP United States [email protected]+1 312 879 3820

14Customer experience: innovate like a FinTech |

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