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Dear Alums and Friends of the Law School:

All of us at the College of Law are extremely pleased to provide you with

this special issue of the Law Forum, devoted exclusively to our wonderful

new JohnJ. Ross-William C. Blakley Law Library and its dedication on

November 5,1993. This magnificent, functional and cost-effective new

Dean Morgan opens the dedication ceremony. In the background is Regent Andrew D. Hurwitz,

library is the culmination of eleven oftheJohnJ. Ross-William C. Blakley Law Library, which years of work by many, many people, through whose efforts completes the law "campus" and provides an absolutely

the Ross-Blakley Law Library became a reality. The making first-rate set of physical facilities for a first-rate law school,

of this library was truly a cooperative effort, in which the the College symbolizes its strength and maturity. The new

law school and the community came together in a very library, which will serve the legal profession and which was

effective partnership. We thank all of you - our friends

lawyers in the community, also

symbolizes the important con

nections between the law school

and the community.

We hope that the Ross-Blakley

Library, and the law school in

general, will continue to be of

significant service to our

community. We hope to serve

you well and to be deserving of

your continuing support. By

building on our partnership with

the community, we can continue

to move this fine law school to

even greater levels of achieve

ment and excellence.

Thanks for all of your support

of the College. Please enjoy the

pages that follow and the

Congressman Sam Coppersmith, Ambassador Harriet C. Babbitt, and President Lattie F. Coor. Ross-Blakley Law Library itself.

If you would like a library tour,

and alums - for your contributions to this much-needed please call 965-4871 to arrange it. Best regards.

project.

As I said at the dedication ceremony, it is fitting that the Very truly yours,

opening of the Ross-Blakley Law Library comes as the law

school enters its second quarter century. With the opening

ofJohn S. Armstrong Hall in 1968, the College symbolized

its potential for the future. During the next twenty-five

years, the College realized that potential, becoming one of Richard J. Morgan, Dean

the leading law schools in this country. With the opening Arizona State University College of Law

LAW

Architectu ral

Photography by

TIMOTHY HURSLEY

Photography by MIKE COOPER

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSI1Y COLLEGE OF LAW

2 lAw LIBRARY ARCHITECTURAL LECTURE

7 IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM C. BLAKLEY JOHN]. ROSS

8 LIBRARY DEDICATION

16 HARRIET IC. BABBITI SPEECH

19 REMARKS OF PAUL ECKSTEIN

22 THEJOHNJ. ROSS-WILLIAM

C. BlAKLEY lAW LIBRARY: A NEW BEGINNING FOR IDE lAw LIBRARY

33 CONTINUED EDUCATION ANOTHER VARIE1Y

35 DONOR PROFILE

36 DONORS

40 PROJECT PERSONNEL

LAW FORUM

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2

_r-=--_ =.__ -- - - - - -- - - - - _-:~j~-:-=

NOVEMBER 4, 1993

The following article is a transcript of the lecture

given by Mack Scogin and Merrill Elam of the Atlanta

architectural firm ofScogin Elam and Bray, the

design architects for theJohn J. Ross-William C. Blakley Law

Library. The lecture, explaining the design process, was

given as part of the dedication celebration.

3

Mack Scogin: Thank you for inviting us to participate in the dedication

festivities. We appreciate the

opportunity to share aspects of the

design process with you.

Merrill Elam: When the project for the Law Library started, both Mack

and I had visited this area of the

country only casually and not often.

While we were taken by the beauty

and expansiveness of the landscape

and the sky, we had no reason to

reckon with it in architectural tenns.

So we came with east-coast eyes and

attempted to absorb as much as

possible about the natural and man

made environment. At some point in

the process I found myself thinking

and writing the following:

The Arizona desert landscape provokes mis-readings. Plants look like animals, animals look like rocks, rocks look like

animals, plants look like rocks, animals look like plants . .. rye foolers. The sun bursts over the horizon not bothering with some filtering effect ofeast coast greenery, but immediately filling an enormous sky with incredible light. Textures and colors vibrate. On the ground plane and along the horizon, every form takes on a hyperness, incredibly legible and overyly important.

The following selection of context

slides begins to illustrate what we were

observing, what touched, concerned,

impressed and fascinated us. The

enonnity of the sky and the intensity

of the light, the importance of even

modest objects on the horizon and in

the ground plane; the successful

efforts of other architects; the great

and powerful shifts in temperature

and weather conditions; the mystery

of the ancients who occupied this land

before us; and finally the difficult,

frayed, parking lot barren, edge

condition site for the proposed

Law Library.

Mack Scogin: If you have walked around the new building you will have

seen the site conditions that Merrill

mentioned. The site is at the extreme

east edge of the campus, and like

several other edge sites on the

campus, has an irregular, curving

boundary rather than the rectilinear

sites of the interior of the campus.

Along the McAllister Street curve, to

the east and south, the campus literally

falls open, giving way to parking lots

and distant small scale commercial

structures. To the west is the playing

field and across it, the business school.

To the north is Annstrong Hall,

separating the Law Library from

Orange Man. Our initial response was

the urge to make a building that

addressed these various edge condi

tions, giving definition to the southeast

edge of the campus, responding

sympathetically to Annstrong Hall and

the playing field, and having some

presence along Orange Mall. The

building became a fairly clear diagram

of these concerns with the west wall of

the tower defining the edge of the

playing field and campus grid and

gesturing toward Orange Mall; the

curvilinear fonn of Technical Services

protecting the McAllister Street edge;

"Magic Mountain" mediating the

Lemon Street axis, the playing field,

and the unbounded southern

expanse.

It occurred to us early on that relocating the library from Annstrong

Hall to a new building would change

the dynamics of student/ faculty

activity and movement. We were

concerned about nurturing, not

diluting the sense of community that

the rotunda space engenders. It was

also clear that a library constitutes the

soul of a law school and that the

existing library, while a little confining

and difficult in tenns of its function in

a round, windowless space, was placed

at the heart of the school, and very

much a part of the center of the life of

the school. And, in fact, we began to

really appreciate the way Annstrong

Hall is organized. I was saying earlier

that what I like about it is that it has

been somehow de-institutionalized by

its shape and its confusing circulation.

I still don't understand how to get to

Jonathan Rose's office. That may be

an asset ~ it may be an asset. Maybe

it's psychological. I don't know. But

no, there's something about this

building that's quite wonderful and

that we truly began to enjoy. And it

had to do, I think, with this communal

feeling that the school has. It reaHy

works as a definitive community, and

a ,lot of that has to do with the rotunda

and the way it's organized. And so, as

we developed a plan, we kept going

back to this connector. We kept going

back with ways in which we could

visually and physically connect to

Annstrong Ha]J. We put a lot of

emphasis on how to make this open

space between the two buildings a part

of the 'living room of the existing

space of the existing building. I think

one of the nicest things that was

decided along the way, was to take the

student lounge out of the west side of

the building and put into the old

library. It really puts the student lounge in a nice relationship to that

open space and the new library. It

hopefully extends the life of the

school and the community into the

library building itself.

Merrill Elam: I believe that Mack has explained almost everything that's safe

to explain without being a library

consultant or expert like George

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