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Developers, Academics, Gaming. bloodshot pizza box caffiene overdrive sorrow embrace the chaos. Section I: Intro. What is our Point?. Our Point is…. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Developers, Academics, Gamingbloodshot pizza boxcaffiene overdrive sorrowembrace the chaos

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Section I: IntroWhat is our Point?

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Our Point is.There is cool research being done in academia on many subjects which are related to gaming and interactive work. Often it ignores actual gaming, and vice versa.

    This is too bad.

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Background: Who are weWe have academic backgroundsWe have game development backgroundsPredisposition towards analysisInterested in game design and technologyWilling to push at current conventions

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • So why are we frustratedConcern with what could be, not what isVery meta, its about what games are aboutSeems unaware of actual current marketLack of understanding of developmentTech research tantalizingly close to relevantMaybe we are just missing the good stuff?

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Evolution of Industry is SlowNew hires need extensive trainingDesign evolves slowly, technology quicklyHard to take risks in commercial spaceLittle analysis or understanding of historyLittle research or data on game players

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • GoalsIdentify and examine interactive issuesInvolvement from non-commercial viewExamine history/provide context for growthHow to utilize academic work in gamingWhat can gaming provide to academiaBetter quality/range of experiences

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Section 2: VocationWhat is the work we do

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • The IndustryPC, Console, Handheld, Interneton PC, 300K is a hit, on Console, 1MEnd-caps, circulars, shelf space paid forPublisher/Developer royalty dealsLike book industry, but costs are ~$3-5M80+% of titles lose money

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Some GenresFighting GamesSports GamesAction/ShootersDriving GamesPuzzle GamesRole Playing GamesDance and Rhythm Games

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Summary of MarketsConsole: sitting on the couch with friendsHandheld: solo gaming up closePC: solo gaming in enclosed areaInternet: solo gamers connected

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • The Development ProcessWrite initial technical and design specsGet a publisher to agree, sign contractFinalize hiring of the initial dev teamTurn out regular demoable milestonesReach alpha, begin serious testReach beta, feature lockdown Gold master release candidates

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • The Development TeamProducer, represents publisherProject lead, builds common visionDesigners, build levels, spec gameplayProgrammers, build tools and gameArtists, provide 2d, 3d, texture, models, etcAudio, records SFX, speech, musicQA, tests the game, tracks/verifies bugs

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Realities of developmentThe first design is never rightUsability is more important than correctnessPerformance is essentialShipping is really hardNever enough timeCreative collaboration is really hardIts just like any other design/tech job

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Who we want to hireBasic knowledge of all development aspectsbiz, design, art, code, producer, qaHave played a lot of gamesSignificant work in creative teamsInvolvement in self-driven creative workUnderstanding of the platformCross-disciplinary, ready to do random stuff

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Who we normally getPeople who run a D&D Campaign who wrote a sci-fi novel in high school who want to play games who want unconditional creative control whove implemented Baraffs Papers who dont think it is hard to write games

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • The problemsLong training timeLimited innovationSloppy development processMany risksExpect player to do what I wantBalkanized development community

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Section 3: TheoryWhat we are (and should be) talking about

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Whats been doneMeta-design unconcerned with real games (what interactivity should be)Social analysis (Barbie to Mortal Kombat)Technology researchphysics: Baraff, Witkin, LinMotion/controllers: Hodginsrendering: Teller

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Design issues to exploreImpact of play style/environment on playerWhat constructs engender interactivity?User-interfaces for actual gameplayI.e. fitting player desires onto a psx controllerInterfaces which become transparent quicklyGeneralizable lessons from specific genresSemiotic analysis of interactivity

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Abstract Tools for interactivityWeve been using computers for gaming for a while, and certain things have proven to be effective in allowing an interactive designer to achieve a certain design vision. This is true across genres and technologies.

    What are these things, how and when are they effectively used.

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Technology we want to know aboutBetter Characters/MotionNatural Language/Conversational ModelsWorld Representations (physics/rendering)Better creation tools for interactive spacesTools for meaningful designer specification of behaviors and events in dynamic worldsGroup AI, Tactics, Teamwork, Attitude

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Developers Never do ThisWe are so busy shipping we dont thinkInfighting, secrecy, lack of journalsAttempt to ride current wave, rarely pushSpend pathetically small time on toolsEvolving platforms force rewritesLess permanance/control over destiny

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Section 4: ExplorationWhat directions might we go

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Academics have to play gamesIt is hard to credibly expand on what games and interactivity can be without contextLook at viable evolution to things people doDont assume all games are beneath themExplore what it is players are responding toNeed faith in the interactive environment

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Game Developers need to interact with AcademicsHave to check out and respond to researchEstablish forums where communities talkAccept and address complexity of current game development, and actually work at itCome up with some way to fund research and prototyping in university settings?

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • Come join the funThe real market is bigMany (most?) of them are annoyingBut, they are real users who really respondIf you do an unreal mod, people will try it

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

  • This is an opportunityIf you want to explore interactive design, you can play existing games and do little demo games of your own.If you want to try new types of things, you can actually do them, and real people will play them, and give you real feedback.

    Gaming, Academia, Peril, etc.

    Yea, yea, the intro slide

    Briefly summarize the presenters, and why it is that they are the sort of people who would be receptive to academic analysis of gamingExplain our issues, what it is which discourages us/motivates us to give this talkNote that even ignoring academics, we are frustrated with the way the industry is growing, and would like it to get betterWhat would we hope for from a more academic approach in gaming/from a better atmosphere of cooperation and assistance between developers and academicsBrief (!) summary of the industryThis will be just a quick overview of the genres, to demostrate a range of possibilities and experiences already existing, mostly to combat the idea that all games are violent and totally idiotic.Note that computer games encompases as range of possibilities, which are non-obviously but significantly different in exprienceHow does a game get developed. Heavily focus on the reality of needing to convince a publisher, the need to continue to convince them, the need to QA and respond to QAWhat does a dev team look like, and whyWhat experience is useful if you are going to get into the industryWhat experience people getting into the industry usually haveWhy this is not so good Quick overview of some of the academic work. Id love to grow this slideIf we were telling people what to investigate, what might we sayWhat could we do about it. Academics need to engage in the actual field, not the one they wish existedDevelopers need to engage with and explore what academics are doingYou can have an actual impact