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  • www.saitnews.co.za Issue 2 1

    Powered bySecond Edition - October 2013 Issue 2 www.saitnews.co.za

    DigitalFocus

    InnovatIon and servIce delIvery

    competItIon trends

    +Infrastructure

    for all

    May/June 2013 | Issue 7

    ADOPTING THE SAAS MODEL

    MUDDLED MIGRATION

    INNOvATION fOR sERvIcE DELIvERy

    AchIEvING RURAL bROADbAND

    INfRAcO PRIORITIZEsRURAL bROADbAND

    THANDO MjEbEzATHANDO MjEbEzA

    ISAAC MAREDIISAAC MAREDI

    ARTHuR GOLDSTuCk

    ARTHuR GOLDSTuCk

    uNDERSTANDING DTT

    uNDERSTANDING DTT

    SAITMag 7.indd 1 2013/05/25 3:36 PMMagazine for the ICT Thought Leader!

    rethInkIng satelIte

    solutIons

    The art ofpolicy making

    Broadband

  • www.saitnews.co.za2 Issue 2

    page 2 | Issue 7 www.saitnews.co.za

    .....................................................................................................................................................

    Information Systems Review & Advisory ServicesERP Solutions (Specializing in SAP)

    Business IntelligenceBusiness Analytics & Forecasting (Specializing in SAS Analytics)

    Leap ahead of the competition

    www.sebase.co.za | (012) 664 - 5181

    SAITMag 7.indd 2 2013/05/25 3:36 PM

  • www.saitnews.co.za Issue 2 3

    EditorialedItorIal

    editorial directornkhume kudzingana

    associate editorrobert nkuna

    contributing Journalistssteven maubane, eugene morokolo and staff reporters

    opinion contributorstinyiko valoyi, fungai sibanda, mulalo ratshisusu and rubben mohlaloga

    editing and proof reading: makatilemedia

    layout and designtiro moeti

    sales and marketingnthabiseng khoza

    Website designlethabo mashike

    publishersaitnews (pty) ltd 249 Basden avenue, crystal park one Block o, lyttelton manor, centurion, 0157gauteng, south africatel: 012 664 5181 fax: 012 664 7920Web: www.saitnews.co.za

    subscriptions and advertising nthabiseng@sebase.co.za

    letters to the editoreditor@saitnews.co.za

    repro and printingphethego advertising and markerting, 850 horseshoe street, littlefallstel: 0116752800 or 0825745696

    Copyrightall material published by saitnews (pty) ltd is copyright and belongs to saitnews (pty) ltd, unless otherwise indicated. no part of the material may be quoted, photocopied, reproduced or stored electronically without prior written permission.

    neither the magazine, the publisher or the editor can be held legally liable in any way for damages of any kind whatsoever arising directly or indirectly from any facts or information provided or omitted in these pages or from any other statements made or withheld by this publication. opinions expressed are not necessarily shared by saitnews (pty) ltd.

    Dear readers and contributors,

    Welcome to the second issue of what promises to be a great magazine for the Whos Who in the ICT sec-tor. We came with the idea to establish Digital Focus to lighten the policy and regulatory space. Our lives in our vari-ous capacities and positions in society depend on a portfolio of good policies. Indeed policies and regulations are influenced by real trends on the ground. These are consumer behavior, technol-ogy and market changes. In order to be meaningful to our readers, we will deal with all these issues in a way that takes the sector to the next level. Digital Focus should allow us to introspect in the quest to build a viable and sus-tainable ICT sec-tor that responds to the needs of all citizens, especially those at the bottom of the pyramid.

    In this edition, we look again at broad-band policy mak-ing. It is not pos-sible to think of putting together an edition that does not mention broadband. Quite impossible, it

    is. South Africa needs a giant leap to catch up with the best in the world. To do this, the country should develop a comprehensive broadband policy that pays equal attention to both supply and demand side issues. For example, we cannot talk about promoting network coverage when we are not sure about access to receiver equipment or gad-gets. Also, policy should be clear on the complimentary roles of various tech-nologies. Technology neutrality is aimed at encouraging innovation to meet the demands of the growing number of con-

    sumers. Digital Migration is

    another critical chal-lenge of our time. A big country like ours cannot fail to develop good DTT policies and regulations. There are many skilled South Africans throughout the value chain. We will dedicate most of our next edition to Digital Migration. It is time to think about Digital Broadcasting in a much more holis-

    tic way beyond Digital Terrestrial Television. South Africa stands to ben-efit more from looking at other tech-nologies such as media services over the Internet Protocol. This is no to say that we should abandon DTT. No. But we have every reason to think about the future in the long term. Good policies also seek to create a better world for future generations!

    Indeed, there are many issues to talk about than we can ever exhaust in

    however many editions of one magazine.

    We will continue to improve our offering as

    we receive feedback from you, our readers.

    It is your product - make the best of it.

    digital migration is another critical challenge of our

    time. a big country like ours cannot fail to develop

    good dtt policies and regulations

    Nkhume Kudzingana

  • www.saitnews.co.za4 Issue 2

    DigitalFocusContents

    Second Edition October 2013 Issue 2

    Broadband in a nutshell ............................................. 6-8

    Broadband: Learning from the best will ease our roll-out campaign ..........................10-11

    The doublespeak of concurrency is irksome .........................................12-13

    Stick for wayward behaviour ..............................14-15

    Game Changer? ........................................................16-17

    Celebrating 10 years of mdda ............................18-21

    Broadband access augers well for nationwide connectivity ................................22-23

    Unisa unveils new science hub ...........................24-25

    Getting high on cannabis ............................................. 26

    Decisions based on fact the new world order ......................................28-29

    Introducing iGauteng .............................................30-31

    Hello, Mr President ...............................................32-34

    E-Learning takes firm root in Gauteng ...........36-37

    CSIR introduces worlds first digital laser ............................................ 38

    Indigenous knowledge systems take positive strides to accelerate growth .............40-42

    Broadband: learning from the best will ease our roll-out campaign

    game changer?

    p10

    p16

    p22Broadband access

    augers well for nationwide

    connectivity

    p24

    p28

    unisa unveils new science hub

    decisions based on fact the new world order

    p32hello, mr president

  • www.saitnews.co.za Issue 2 5

    www.govtech.co.za

    INNOVATIONTechnology for the 21st Century Government

    GovTech 2013 will explore the myriad of ways in which emerging technologies such as cloud computing, mobile devices and social media can be deployed to improve

    service delivery across all spheres of Government.

    Join us as we share ideas to enable support for implementation of the public sector ICT agenda for service delivery.

    HOSPITALITY PARTNERS

    TRANSPORT PARTNEREXECUTIVE PARTNER

    TECHNOLOGY PARTNERS

    GOVERNMENT COLLABORATION PARTNERS

    INNOVATION PARTNERS

  • www.saitnews.co.za6 Issue 2

    For years hitherto, South Africa has been trying to develop a comprehensive broadband plan to increase the uptake and usage of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) throughout the country. According to the Broadband Commission, good policies are a requirement towards the attainment of universal access to electronic com-munications services, including broad-band.

    South Africas experimentation with broadband policy includes ini-tial attempts by the then Presidential National Commission (PNC) in the mid-2000s to develop an Information Society and Development (ISAD) plan, and the publication of the first Broadband Policy in 2010.

    Both the ISAD plan and the 2010 broadband policy were not imple-mented for reasons including the mis-match between these policies and the existing laws at the time. There were also instances of severe institutional weaknesses placing constraints on the capacity of the state to develop cogent policies.

    On policy alignment, the 2010 broadband policy was largely lim-ited to defining the download speed at 256 kbps, and was pointedly silent on its relationship with the Electronic

    Communications Act (ECA) which deals with the entire electronic communica-tions services sector.

    Understandably, existing laws should not constrain new policy think-ing; provided it is always clear how new policies find nexus with the prevailing legal context. This may entail amending existing legislation to be in line with new policy thinking. Policies, as state-ments of intent, should inform and shape legislation.

    Related to this, there has always been a need to clarify the position of broadband policy within the overall ICT policy environment. Is broadband an isolated policy process, or whether it forms an integral part of the broader ICT or electronic communications poli-cy environment?

    Answering this question is par-ticularly important in the South African context considering that the Department of Communications is cur-rently undertaking a