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  • Discrete Mathematics & Mathematical ReasoningChapter 6: Counting

    Colin Stirling

    Informatics

    Slides originally by Kousha Etessami

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 1 / 39

  • Chapter Summary

    The Basics of CountingThe Pigeonhole PrinciplePermutations and CombinationsBinomial Coefficients and IdentitiesGeneralized Permutations and Combinations

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 2 / 39

  • Basic Counting: The Product RuleRecall: For a set A, |A| is the cardinality of A (# of elements of A).

    For a pair of sets A and B, A B denotes their cartesian product:

    A B = {(a,b) | a A b B}

    Product RuleIf A and B are finite sets, then: |A B| = |A| |B|.

    Proof: Obvious, but prove it yourself by induction on |A|.

    general Product RuleIf A1,A2, . . . ,Am are finite sets, then

    |A1 A2 . . . Am| = |A1| |A2| . . . |Am|

    Proof: By induction on m, using the (basic) product rule.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 3 / 39

  • Basic Counting: The Product RuleRecall: For a set A, |A| is the cardinality of A (# of elements of A).

    For a pair of sets A and B, A B denotes their cartesian product:

    A B = {(a,b) | a A b B}

    Product RuleIf A and B are finite sets, then: |A B| = |A| |B|.

    Proof: Obvious, but prove it yourself by induction on |A|.

    general Product RuleIf A1,A2, . . . ,Am are finite sets, then

    |A1 A2 . . . Am| = |A1| |A2| . . . |Am|

    Proof: By induction on m, using the (basic) product rule.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 3 / 39

  • Product Rule: examples

    Example 1: How many bit strings of length seven are there?

    Solution: Since each bit is either 0 or 1, applying the product rule,the answer is 27 = 128.

    Example 2: How many different car license plates can be made ifeach plate contains a sequence of three uppercase English lettersfollowed by three digits?

    Solution: 26 26 26 10 10 10 = 17,576,000.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 4 / 39

  • Product Rule: examples

    Example 1: How many bit strings of length seven are there?

    Solution: Since each bit is either 0 or 1, applying the product rule,the answer is 27 = 128.

    Example 2: How many different car license plates can be made ifeach plate contains a sequence of three uppercase English lettersfollowed by three digits?

    Solution: 26 26 26 10 10 10 = 17,576,000.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 4 / 39

  • Product Rule: examples

    Example 1: How many bit strings of length seven are there?

    Solution: Since each bit is either 0 or 1, applying the product rule,the answer is 27 = 128.

    Example 2: How many different car license plates can be made ifeach plate contains a sequence of three uppercase English lettersfollowed by three digits?

    Solution: 26 26 26 10 10 10 = 17,576,000.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 4 / 39

  • Product Rule: examples

    Example 1: How many bit strings of length seven are there?

    Solution: Since each bit is either 0 or 1, applying the product rule,the answer is 27 = 128.

    Example 2: How many different car license plates can be made ifeach plate contains a sequence of three uppercase English lettersfollowed by three digits?

    Solution: 26 26 26 10 10 10 = 17,576,000.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 4 / 39

  • Counting Subsets

    Number of Subsets of a Finite SetA finite set, S, has 2|S| distinct subsets.

    Proof: Suppose S = {s1, s2, . . . , sm}.There is a one-to-one correspondence (bijection), between subsets ofS and bit strings of length m = |S|.The bit string of length |S| we associate with a subset A S has a 1 inposition i if si A, and 0 in position i if si 6 A, for all i {1, . . . ,m}.

    {s2, s4, s5, . . . , sm} = 0 1 0 1 1 . . . 1 m

    By the product rule, there are 2|S| such bit strings.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 5 / 39

  • Counting Subsets

    Number of Subsets of a Finite SetA finite set, S, has 2|S| distinct subsets.

    Proof: Suppose S = {s1, s2, . . . , sm}.There is a one-to-one correspondence (bijection), between subsets ofS and bit strings of length m = |S|.The bit string of length |S| we associate with a subset A S has a 1 inposition i if si A, and 0 in position i if si 6 A, for all i {1, . . . ,m}.

    {s2, s4, s5, . . . , sm} = 0 1 0 1 1 . . . 1 m

    By the product rule, there are 2|S| such bit strings.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 5 / 39

  • Counting Functions

    Number of FunctionsFor all finite sets A and B, the number of distinct functions, f : A B,mapping A to B is:

    |B||A|

    Proof: Suppose A = {a1, . . . ,am}.There is a one-to-one correspondence between functions f : A Band strings (sequences) of length m = |A| over an alphabet of sizen = |B|:

    (f : A B) = f (a1) f (a2) f (a3) . . . f (am)

    By the product rule, there are nm such strings of length m.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 6 / 39

  • Sum Rule

    Sum RuleIf A and B are finite sets that are disjoint (meaning A B = ), then

    |A B| = |A|+ |B|

    Proof. Obvious. (If you must, prove it yourself by induction on |A|.)

    general Sum RuleIf A1, . . . ,Am are finite sets that are pairwise disjoint, meaningAi Aj = , for all i , j {1, . . . ,m}, then

    |A1 A2 . . . Am| = |A1|+ |A2|+ . . .+ |Am|

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 7 / 39

  • Sum Rule: ExamplesExample 1: Suppose variable names in a programming languagecan be either a single uppercase letter or an uppercase letter followedby a digit. Find the number of possible variable names.

    Solution: Use the sum and product rules: 26 + 26 10 = 286.

    Example 2: Each user on a computer system has a password whichmust be six to eight characters long.Each character is an uppercase letter or digit.Each password must contain at least one digit.How many possible passwords are there?

    Solution: Let P be the total number of passwords, and let P6,P7,P8be the number of passwords of lengths 6, 7, and 8, respectively.

    By the sum rule P = P6 + P7 + P8.P6 = 366 266; P7 = 367 267; P8 = 368 268.So, P = P6 + P7 + P8 =

    8i=6(36

    i 26i).

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 8 / 39

  • Sum Rule: ExamplesExample 1: Suppose variable names in a programming languagecan be either a single uppercase letter or an uppercase letter followedby a digit. Find the number of possible variable names.

    Solution: Use the sum and product rules: 26 + 26 10 = 286.

    Example 2: Each user on a computer system has a password whichmust be six to eight characters long.Each character is an uppercase letter or digit.Each password must contain at least one digit.How many possible passwords are there?

    Solution: Let P be the total number of passwords, and let P6,P7,P8be the number of passwords of lengths 6, 7, and 8, respectively.

    By the sum rule P = P6 + P7 + P8.P6 = 366 266; P7 = 367 267; P8 = 368 268.So, P = P6 + P7 + P8 =

    8i=6(36

    i 26i).

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 8 / 39

  • Sum Rule: ExamplesExample 1: Suppose variable names in a programming languagecan be either a single uppercase letter or an uppercase letter followedby a digit. Find the number of possible variable names.

    Solution: Use the sum and product rules: 26 + 26 10 = 286.

    Example 2: Each user on a computer system has a password whichmust be six to eight characters long.Each character is an uppercase letter or digit.Each password must contain at least one digit.How many possible passwords are there?

    Solution: Let P be the total number of passwords, and let P6,P7,P8be the number of passwords of lengths 6, 7, and 8, respectively.

    By the sum rule P = P6 + P7 + P8.P6 = 366 266; P7 = 367 267; P8 = 368 268.So, P = P6 + P7 + P8 =

    8i=6(36

    i 26i).

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 8 / 39

  • Sum Rule: ExamplesExample 1: Suppose variable names in a programming languagecan be either a single uppercase letter or an uppercase letter followedby a digit. Find the number of possible variable names.

    Solution: Use the sum and product rules: 26 + 26 10 = 286.

    Example 2: Each user on a computer system has a password whichmust be six to eight characters long.Each character is an uppercase letter or digit.Each password must contain at least one digit.How many possible passwords are there?

    Solution: Let P be the total number of passwords, and let P6,P7,P8be the number of passwords of lengths 6, 7, and 8, respectively.

    By the sum rule P = P6 + P7 + P8.P6 = 366 266; P7 = 367 267; P8 = 368 268.So, P = P6 + P7 + P8 =

    8i=6(36

    i 26i).Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 8 / 39

  • Subtraction Rule (Inclusion-Exclusion for two sets)

    Subtraction RuleFor any finite sets A and B (not necessarily disjoint),

    |A B| = |A|+ |B| |A B|

    Proof: Venn Diagram:

    A A B B

    |A| + |B| overcounts (twice) exactly those elements in A B.

    Colin Stirling (Informatics) Discrete Mathematics (Chapter 6) Today 9 / 39

  • Subtraction Rule: Example

    Example: How many bit strings of length 8 either start with a 1 bit orend with the two bits 00?

    Solution:Number of

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