Engage Furman Magazine

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<p>engagef urman</p> <p>volume 5 | issue 2</p> <p>ask the ambassador</p> <p>from the editor</p> <p>Have a burning question about Furman?Visit or write to . One of our ambassadors will send you a personal response, and we might print it in the next issue of EngageFurman!</p> <p>visit campus and engage</p> <p>T</p> <p>his magazine probably arrived at your house along with brochures, letters and viewbooks from colleges across the country. Several years ago, we produced a yearly viewbook for prospective</p> <p>studentsa 36 to 48-page booklet with facts and figures and beautiful pictures of students on our stunning campus. But in an attempt to give you a more realistic view of life at Furman, we began publishing EngageFurman three times a year. Youll find in it some of the same information you get in those traditional viewbooksapplication deadlines, lists of majors, facts about Furman, and answers to frequently asked questions. But youll also find real stories about students, faculty and alumnilike the one about how Charlie Nagles translation of the memoir of a Salvadoran revolutionary is getting published by the University of Texas Press. And youll learn what Furman students love about living in Greenville. And how a philosophy class (that meets at 7:30 a.m. in a Japanese temple) has helped students deal with stress and mental clutter. And youll find out what engaged learning is really about in a story about</p> <p>Admissions Ambassadors (left to right) Brena Bell 10, Psychology, Atlanta, Georgia; J.T. Wilde 10, Communication Studies, Ocean City, Maryland; Lydia Rowe 10, Spanish/Communication Studies, Marietta, South Carolina; John Schmidt 11, ICP (Individualized Curriculum Program) in Business, Communication Studies and Art, Marietta, Georgia</p> <p>Isnt it time we met at my place?How are roommates chosen? Lydia: You can request to live with someWhat if I dont know what I want to major in? Brenai: At Furman, you typically donthave to declare a major until the end of your sophomore year. Being undecided can actually be beneficial because you can fullfil your core requirements through math, science, history, social studies, English, fine arts and more. This provides an opportunity to identify your interests. Youre about to make a committment which will effect your entire life a decision which should not be based only on electronic or print information. A university has to feel rightsomething that virtual contact cannot reveal. Thats why you need to visit Furman and find out what engaged learning is really about.</p> <p>Furman Engaged!, an all-day celebration where students presented, performed and demonstrated for the Furman community. Take some time to read through EngageFurman. Almost every story has a link to more information on the web. As realistic as we try to be, nothing takes the place of actually visiting campus. So schedule a visit to Furman and to Greenville. Wed love to show you around.</p> <p>Will I have time to get involved in other things besides studying? Brenai Bell: Ive found it very easy to getinvolved, and Furman definitely has a huge variety of activities to pursue. I would suggest finding out what youre really interested in, and choosing one or two activities that you can commit to, rather than joining several activities that you may not have time for.</p> <p>one, but if not you fill out a several page survey that includes everything from your height to music preferences. Furman then matches you with someone who they think is compatible with you. Its a great system that avoids bad housing situations.</p> <p>John: There is a long comprehensive roommate form that you fill out prior to your arrival to help housing place you with a suitable roommate. You also have a choice to request to live with someone you know instead of a random roommate, but whats the fun in that?</p> <p>Lets set a date.To schedule a visit, go to or call 864.294.2034. Find out if Furman is the right choice for you.</p> <p>Lydia: Yes! It all comes down to time management. Im a procrastinator, am involved in several organizations, and still have time to have fun on the weekends. If youre not typically a stressed out person, you wont be here either.</p> <p>Lydia: I went through several majors in myfirst two years, but that is what is so great about the liberal arts program. Youre able to take classes from all sorts of fields as core requirements that help you decide exactly what you like to do.</p> <p>Brad Pochard Director of Admission</p> <p>John: Time is relative. You have it if youmake it. Being active on campus is encouraged (and almost all students are), but not necessary. Its all about how you manage your time.</p> <p>J.T.: Freshman and transfer students fillout a questionnaire before they come onto campus with questions that range from Do you wake up early? to Are you over six feet tall? With this wide range of questions, usually roommate pairs are matched up fairly well due to their similar answers.</p> <p>J.T.: When I came to Furman, I had no ideawhat I wanted to major in. I had the opportunity to take classes in all different fields and really see what interested me and what did not. That really helped me figure out what path I wanted to pursue and what major would work best.</p> <p>1</p> <p>news and notes</p> <p>engage furmanVolume 5, Issue 2</p> <p>in this issue . . .</p> <p>Broken recordsWhether he was running cross country in the fall, indoor track in the winter or outdoor track in the spring, Patrick Morgan proved to be a man for all seasons. During his senior year at Furman, the 2009 graduate broke the universitys 31-year-old record in the mile run with a time of 4:05.90 at the Kentucky Invitational. One month later at a Notre Dame meet, he lowered the record by another 1.5 seconds with a time of 4:04.45. He also posted personalbest times in the 800- and 3,000-meter runs and was named Southern Conference Athlete of the Week during each of the cross country and track seasons. Morgan, a native of Danville, Ky., graduated with a B.S. degree in Health and Exercise Science. This fall, he will attend graduate school at Appalachian State University, where hell pursue a masters degree in exercise science with a concentration in cardiac pulmonary rehab.</p> <p>Furman students win Truman, Goldwater ScholarshipsBen Able 10 from Saluda, S.C., has been named a 2009 Truman Scholar. Able is one of 60 college students from across the nation to receive the highly competitive Truman Scholarship, given annually to students who have excelled academically and are committed to careers in public service. The Truman award provides up to $30,000 for graduate study. Christopher Turlington 10, a chemistry major from Mills River, N.C., has been awarded a prestigious Goldwater Scholarship. Turlington was one of 278 sophomores and juniors from around the nation selected. Named for five-term U.S. Sen. Barry Goldwater, the scholarship program was established by Congress in 1986 to address the need for outstanding students to pursue careers in mathematics, natural sciences and engineering.</p> <p>Published by Furman University to provide prospective students with information about and insight into the engaged learning experience.</p> <p>5</p> <p>Furman by the NumbersWhy a Furman education is a wise investment.</p> <p>Furman University PresidentDavid E. Shi</p> <p>Furman Engaged! 7The universitys campus-wide, day-long celebration of engaged learning takes the campus by storm.</p> <p>Vice President for EnrollmentBill Berg</p> <p>Director of AdmissionBrad Pochard</p> <p>Furmans Cycling Team wins Division II team time trial at national championshipsFor the second consecutive year, the Furman Cycling Team returned from the USA Cycling Collegiate Road National Championships with a national title. The Furman squadChris Butler of Hilton Head Island, Spencer Beamer of Knoxville, Tenn., Kit Hunter of Brentwood, Tenn., and Craig McKinney of Rock Hillwon the Division II team time trial in May with a time of 37:03:13.</p> <p>Associate Directors of AdmissionJeny Bishop Kerscher Frank McClary Laura Simmons</p> <p>10</p> <p>Greenville: A Small City that Thinks BigWhat its like living in a microcity of the future.</p> <p>Admission CounselorsMichael Dostie Tia Sullivan Lindsey Walker Furman University Admission 3300 Poinsett Highway Greenville, South Carolina 296135245 admission@furman.edu Andy Waters Libby Weith</p> <p>12</p> <p>Realizing Body MindEnglish major Riley Kross takes us to a tranquil side of campus where students leave stress and shoes at the door.</p> <p>Grant to fund student research in chemistryFurman is one of nine schools in the nation awarded a Beckman Scholars Program Institutional Award, a highly competitive grant supporting scientific research by undergraduates. The $77,200 grant was awarded to the Chemistry Department. This is the twelfth year of the Beckman program, and Furman is one of five baccalaureate institutions to have received at least four of the awards over the history of the program.</p> <p>Acts of Forgiveness16A recent grads award-winning documentary of forgiving, rebuilding and triumph (reprinted from the Washington Post).</p> <p>Six Furman teams recognized for academicsThe NCAA has honored six Furman athletic teams with public recognition awards for their latest Academic Progress Rate (APR) scores. The Furman teams cited are mens cross country, mens golf, mens outdoor track &amp; field, womens basketball, womens indoor track &amp; field, and womens outdoor track &amp; field. These teams posted APR scores in the top 10 percent of all squads in their respective sports for the past four years.</p> <p>864.294.2034 Fax: 864.294.2018 Furman University is committed to providing equal access to its educational programs, activities, and facilities to all otherwise qualified students without discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, color, creed, religion, sex, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or any other category protected by applicable state or federal law. For information about Furmans compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act, contact the Disability Services Coordinator, 864.294.2320, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville,SC 29613. Printed on recycled paper.</p> <p>Liberian President speaks on campusLiberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, known as Africas Iron Lady, visited the campus this spring, where she received an honorary degree and participated in a conversation with Furman president David Shi. Her visit was sponsored by Furmans Riley Institute and Water of Lifes Global Pebble Project.2</p> <p>20</p> <p>1 Green Furman + 1 Green Video = 5 Green Macs</p> <p>Cover Story</p> <p>Five students team up on a film highlighting Furmans environmental commitment.</p> <p>Mens, womens golf teams capture the conferenceThe mens and womens golf teams captured the SoCon championship this spring. The men won their second straight championship, earning an automatic bid to the NCAA tournament; the women captured their 13th SoCon Championship and made their 17th straight NCAA tournament appearance.</p> <p>Hot Shot22Melissa Liebschwager stars in ESPNs 21st Annual 3-Point Championship.</p> <p>Interpreting the Voice of a Revolution24Spanish major Charlie Nagles language skills lead him to translating a Salvadoran revolutionarys memoir.</p> <p>FIND OUT MORE about Furman at </p> <p>3</p> <p>furman facts</p> <p>engaged classroom</p> <p>Furman by the numbersWhat the statistics mean to you . . .</p> <p>What Furman students do after graduating: 41% head directlyto graduate school Out of that group...</p> <p>T</p> <p>he headline of a recent story in USA Today read, 4-year colleges graduate 53 percent The story, which featured a report by</p> <p>rankings look at graduation rates to judge the effectiveness of institutions. They also look at the retention rate (how many students come back after freshman year) and alumni involvement to determine if students have a positive experience. At Furman, 92 percent of freshmen return for their sophomore year (the national average for private colleges is 75 percent). And more than 45 percent of our alumni give back to Furman every year (as opposed to a national average of 28 percent). So what does all that mean for you? Since 81 percent of our students graduate in four years, students (and their parents) dont end up paying for five or six years of tuition. And it means that our students are having a good experience hereevidenced by the fact that they come back and they stay involved as Furman alumni.</p> <p>42%</p> <p>of students in 6 years. the non-profit think tank American Enterprise Institute (AEI), went on to say that nationally, just 53 percent of students entering four-year colleges graduated within six years. The story was based on data reported to the Education Department by nearly 1,400 schools about full-time first-time students who entered in fall 2001. Furmans four-year graduation rate of 81 percent puts us at the top of public and private institutions deemed highly competitive in the South. Before picking a college, prospective students and their parents should thoroughly examine the schools graduation rate, the AEI advises. Wed agree with that. Most of the college</p> <p>enter a graduate program related to their major</p> <p>18% head to lawschool</p> <p>12% 7%</p> <p>go to medical or dental school go into other health-related programs</p> <p>5557% hit thejob market (aided by the experiences theyve had at Furman internships, study away, research with professors as well as assistance from Career Services)</p> <p>Furman Engaged!Engaged learning has become a hot concept in the world of higher education, but do you really hands-on approach to learning that colleges are trying to sell you? Just ask a Furman student. By conducting undergraduate research, holding internships and participating in study away programs, Furman students are putting the concept of engaged learning into practice, and this past April, they got a unique opportunity to showcase their discoveries. Furman Engaged! sponsored by Furman Undergraduate Research and Internships is the universitys first campus-wide celebration of engaged learning. The event began on April 2 with a keynote address, Public Science Literacy in the 21st Century, by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Leon Lederman. The following day, classes were cancelled and beginning at 9 a.m., students from all disciplines presented, presided and performed in venues across the campus. Divided into eight overlapping blocks of time, there were 48 sessions that included panels, demonstrations, performances and know what the term means? What exactly is the</p> <p>A celebration of Engaged Learning</p> <p>around 200 oral presentations. Approximately 110 posters and exhibits involving the work of about 170 students were set up in the Herman W. Lay Physical Activity Center and in Kohrt Commons in the Townes Science Center, and</p> <p>about a quarter of the students were present during each session to explain their research. An International Food Festival, planetarium shows and a Paladin Nites performance were also a part of the days events. Well attended by both the public and...</p>