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The Center for Civic Engagement joined the Office of Outreach and Community Partnerships to compile and publish this annual report on engagement. Simultaneously using an innovative system to record 2013-14 engagement activity on both campuses, an exciting picture of widespread and long-standing engagement emerged.

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  • CommunitiesENGAGING

    2014

  • EIntroduction Message 3 The Engaged Campus 4

    Highlights

    Overview 6 Engagement Data 7

    Profiles

    Engagement by College 13 Arts, Humanities & Liberal Arts 14 Business 16 Education 18 Engineering & Computer Science 20 Social & Behavioral Sciences 21 Health 22 Math, Sciences & Technology 24

    Partners

    Our Partners 26

    Table ofContents

    20

  • Profiles

    Engagement by College 13 Arts, Humanities & Liberal Arts 14 Business 16 Education 18 Engineering & Computer Science 20 Social & Behavioral Sciences 21 Health 22 Math, Sciences & Technology 24

    Message

    Dear Colleagues & Partners,We are proud to present ENGAGING COMMUNITIES 2014, highlighting the notable work occurring across both UTPA and UTB campuses. The purpose of this annual report is to recognize faculty, staff, and student excellence in community engagement while demonstrating our commitment to sustainable community partnerships. This publication begins with a chronology of key milestones that have advanced the goal of institutionalizing community engagement at each campus. It follows with segments featuring general data, profiles of engagement, and a special recognition of key community partners.

    Although the level of activity reported is truly outstanding, interactions with the community clearly stretch much wider than the scope of this report. We acknowledge that the universities contributions to our students and society are much greater than was possible to capture through this exercise.

    Over the course of history, UTPA and UTB have charted unique pathways building the formal infrastructure that supports community-based teaching, learning, and research. Collectively, these pathways have become the foundation for an institutional culture and identity that aligns community engagement as a principle element of UTRGVs core mission.

    We thank all who have joined in our efforts to improve academic and professional outcomes for our students, to strengthen faculty scholarship, and to enhance the universities capacity for service.

    William Fannin, Ph.D. UTB President Ad Interim

    Havidn Rodrguez, Ph.D. UTPA President Ad Interim

  • Our Road to Institutionalizing Engagement

    ...Intentionally connect faculty, staff, students, and external partners in ways that enhance teaching and research while helping revitalize our community.

    ...Engage the campus communities through service learning, volunteering, and community- based scholarship in teaching and research, adding new knowledge to our community and to the academy.

    ...Engage the community at-large in collaborative initiatives that build social capital and encourage civic participation.

    ...Emphasize community engagement through their activities and their definition of scholarship.

    by Creating Campuses that...

    200

    1

    201

    0Center for Civic Engagementestablished to connect faculty, sta, students, and external community.

    Kids Voting USA-Brownsvillefounded to teach the basics of responsible citizenship in a free society, implemented in K-12 schools.

    The University of Texas-Pan American The University of Texas at Brownsville

    2013 Outreach & Community

    Partnerships established as the centralized coordinating unit for engagement campus-wide.

    2011 Task Force assessed and proposed campus-wide

    engagement strategies.

    2012 e Engaged University strategic plan established community

    engagement as a top institutional priority.

    200

    8 Task Force leads Carnegie Foundation engaged university application process.

    Carnegie Foundation classication obtained recognizing institutionalized community engagement, outreach and partnerships.

    201

    2

    e Presidents Honor Roll recognition earned for exceptional community service in higher education.

  • INTR

    OD

    UCTIO

    N

    2015

    2014 Policyrecognizing engaged

    scholarship in faculty rules and responsibilities adopted by faculty senate.

    UTRGV Working Groups establish community engagement as a key component of new university mission. 20

    14

    Engaging Communities Report

    Faculty Fellows appointed to help facilitate implementation of the Engaged University Strategic plan.

    Title V Grantobtained to advance experiential learning and faculty development.

    collectively features engagement work across the campuses.

    The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

  • ExecutiveSummary

    Overview

    Methodology

    The Center for Civic Engagement joined the Office of Outreach and Community Partnerships to compile and publish this annual report on engagement. Simultaneously using an innovative system to record 2013-14 engagement activity on both campuses, an exciting picture of widespread and long-standing engagement emerged.

    Although the level of activity reported is truly outstanding, interactions with the community clearly stretch much wider than the scope of this report. We acknowledge that the universities contributions to our students and society are much greater than was possible to capture through this exercise - Campus Leadership.

    A survey tool was designed with input from a vast number of faculty and staff involved in engagement work. It was first administered at UTPA in 2013 to document community engagement activity for the 2012-13 academic year. Given the current state of transition to UTRGV, the survey was administered simultaneously at UTPA and UTB in September 2014, to obtain data for the 2013-14 academic year from both campuses. Over 490 faculty & Staff responded to the survey.

    The data obtained was analyzed in a variety of ways to inform both campuses independently and collectively. The results are presented jointly in the HIGHLIGHTS section of this report, to provide a general overview of activities and to present a snapshot of the great work taking place.

    Team

    Staff Faculty Advisors

    CRISTINA TREJO-VASQUEZ, LMSW ETHEL CANTU, MA

    DANIKA BROWN, PHD

    Community Engagement Liaison, UTPA Associate VPAA-Student Success, UTB

    Associate Professor/Director of UR&SL, UTPA

    JOSE GUTIERREZ, PHD

    ARMANDO GALVAN-CRUCES

    ESTELA MARTINEZ

    LINDA MATTHEWS, PHD

    Faculty Fellow, UTPA

    Data Management Specialist, UTPA

    Coordinator, Center for Civic Engagement, UTB

    Professor, UTPA

    JAVIER KYPUROS, PHD

    Associate Dean/Professor, UTPA

    JOHN COOK, PHD Associate Professor/Chair, UTB

    KARIN LEWIS, PHD Assistant Professor, UTB

  • Serving The Rio Grande Valley

    96%

    4%

    Yes No

    Survey results indicate that the largest concentration of community engagement (ninety-six percent) takes place in the Rio Grande Valley. Only four percent report working outside of the Rio Grande Valley region.

    Engagement in Colonias

    25%Reaching communities in economically distressed areas is of utmost importance to our institutions of higher education. Evidence of local commitment is depicted by one-fourth (twenty-five percent) of the initiatives reporting work with the colonias of the Rio Grande Valley.

    Engagement Data

    Alamo

    Brownsville

    Donna

    Edinburg

    Harlingen

    La Joya

    Linn

    Lyford

    McAllen

    Mission

    Pharr

    Port Isabel

    Elsa

    S. Padre Island

    Weslaco

    Cities within the Rio Grande Valley where university-community partnerships exist.

    20

    HIG

    HLI

    GH

    TS

  • Student Engagement

    Yes: No:

    89%

    Does it engage students?High-impact practices that engage students, faculty, and external partners in experiential learning transform students and communities. Most of the initiatives (eight-nine percent) report the involvement of students in community engagement effforts.

    Does the initiative take place on campus?

    Almost half of the initiatives (forty-seven percent) take place off campus and in the community.

    Yes No

    47%53%

    How does it engage students?

    Engagement Location

    3%

    6%

    7%

    9%

    37%

    38%

    Non-paid Internship

    Direct Wage Student Employment

    Paid Internship

    Other

    Experiential Student Learning

    Student Involvement (extracurricular: non-credit/volunteer)

    (curricular/co-curricular)

    11%

    20

  • Community Input

    Do you measure or assess the impact of engagement with the community?Over one-half (Fifty-three percent) of the respondents report measuring the impact of the engaged work conducted. Yes No

    53%

    Do you use your assessment for continuous improvement/development of your program?Typ

    Of those who report measuring some type of program assessment, most (ninety-three percent) use the results for continuous improvement. Yes No

    93%

    Assessment

    Students Faculty StaInstitutionalCommunity Other

    46%What impact of engagement is measured?The impact on community is most commonly measured (forty-six percent), followed by impact on students (thirty-six percent).

    Do you obtain community input?An engaged university works in partnership with the community. The majority of the initiatives (sixty-seven percent) report obtaining community input in the planning and implementation of their work.

    37%