engaging youth in dialogue - amazon web services · pdf file engaging youth in dialogue...

Click here to load reader

Post on 18-Oct-2020

4 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • 1

    As a relatively new entrant into the field of  peace building through my selection into  the Dialogue Fiji committee, I have always  wondered why dialogue was not a popular  choice for peace building efforts in the  past.   The more I read of its successful applica‐ tions in other contexts and situations, the  more I wonder why and how this obvi‐ ously successful, capacity building, solu‐ tion‐based approach is not widely used as  the “go‐to” tool for problem solving.   From where I sit, not just as someone who  works in the civil society sector but as a  youth, it almost seems like there is already  so much knowledge on “what not to do”  rather than “what to do”. Why isn’t dia‐ logue on the top of the list of ‘Needs to Be  Done to Fix This’ for communities and  groups who find themselves in conflict  and crisis situations?  When I think about youths and how we  can effectively hear from them, I cant help  but ask whether methodologies of Dia‐ logue can be adapted, to make it more hip  and in with the “crowd” while keeping to  its core purpose.  The world witnessed a wave of powerful  youth uprisings across the globe in 2011.  While their issues were different, the feel‐ ings were similar. They were disappointed  and frustrated.  They might not have been considered im‐ portant before within their own countries  but I'm  sure, that perception has changed  now. I think if the decision makers in those  countries genuinely valued youths (and  they should, Time magazine has said  the  central, underlying feature of the Middle  East's crisis is a massive youth bulge), they  would have realised that youths participa‐ tion is critical to the ongoing prosperity  and stability of their countries.   Youths are not looking for anything com‐ plicated, just the opportunity to air their  fears, concerns, hear from their leaders  and be able to contribute their strengths  for solutions and build a future that they  can look forward to.   For me, that starting point is dialogue.  Furthermore, making sure the current 

    dialogue process is youth friendly, inclu‐ sive and participatory.  Perhaps as we are exploring these, we can  also consider incorporating into the proc‐ ess activities that allow us to tap into the  creativity, optimism, passion and excite‐ ment of young people. I believe the Dia‐ logue Fiji secretariat has its work cut‐out  for them for the year; these suggestions  are at best recommendations towards  2013.  In summary, how do we use dialogue to  contribute to the building of our nation as  we move towards mid 2012? And how do  we ensure that this time around (as com‐ pared to 1987 and 2000),  

     youths are included,    are capacity built and encour‐

    aged  to contribute effectively,   and most importantly begin 

    leading Fiji into the future us‐ ing a culture of dialogue and  understanding. 

    www.dialoguefiji.com MARCH 2012 VOLUME 1, ISSUE 4

    Momentum

    ENGAGING YOUTH IN DIALOGUE

    Dialogue Fiji Vision:

    A Fiji where people re- spect each others’ dif- ferences and share a common will to build a free, peaceful, and in- clusive nation.

    Dialogue Fiji

    Mission:

    Engage with others to build capacity in Fiji’s society to create inclu- sive spaces for dialogue and peace building.

     

    Dialogue Fiji

    Committee :

    � Suliana Siwatibau

    � Rev. Akuila Yabaki

    � Virisila Buadromo

    � Willie Kwansing

    � Daryl Tarte

    � Ratu Meli Vesikula

    � Nemani Mati

    � Nisha Buksh

    � Kelerayani Gavidi

    � Ricardo Morris

    Nemani Buresova

    Mereoni Chung

    Inside this issue:

    DF Staff Attend PCP Training 2

    Spreading the Dialogue Influence 3

    Dialogue Lessons: 4– 6

    CONTACT DETAILS Phone: (679) 3552255/ 9767968 E-mail: dialoguefiji3@gmail.com

    ADDRESS

    49 Gladstone Road G. P.O. Box 12642 Suva Fiji Islands www.dialoguefiji.com

    A Dialogue Reflection by Mereoni Chung

    Mereoni Chung after the Citizen’s Assem- bly 2012 in Suva where she was elected

    into the Dialogue Fiji committee

  • 2

    PAGE 2 MOMENTUM

    DF STAFF ATTEND PCP TRAINING ON NEGOTIATION AND MEDIATION

    Dialogue is an approach to conflict resolution that  Dialogue Fiji secretariat staff members, George Na‐ cewa and Vani Catanasiga may well be familiar with.  

    But concepts of negotiation and mediation, as they  discovered at the Pacific Centre for Peace Building  sponsored training in March, were extensions of  transformative approaches to conflict resolution  that could serve to enhance their capacities as peace  builders.  

    The three day training, which was facilitated by the  United Nations Development Program Pacific Cen‐ tre, was held at the Raddisons Blu Resort at Denarau  and included participants from civil society, govern‐ ment and private sectors.  

    “I was really fortunate to be part of the training and  being the youngest participant at that. I enjoyed  hearing different perspectives as there were a cross  sectoral representation at the training,” George  said.  

    “I appreciated hearing from colleagues in the Fiji  Military Forces and finally being able to understand  them not just in their capacities as military offices  but also as human beings and citizens of Fiji.” 

    George who is a trained dialogue facilitator said a  key learning from the workshop was that negotia‐ tion is between two individuals with differences  whereas mediation creates an enabling environment 

    for a third party to come in to monitor and bring to  light common interests. 

     “So it is important to ask the right questions while  mediating or negotiating so that one avoids taking  the narrow approach and ensure that some kind of  understanding is created,” he said. 

    For Vani, the workshop was an eye opener and  helped her to understand that there were other as‐ pects to peace building to discover. 

    “I think a transformational learning from the work‐ shop was that conflict doesn’t always have to be  negative, it can be good and an opportunity for  much needed change,” Vani said.  

    She said at the workshop, facilitators drew parallels  between conflict and a river.  

    “They talked about how a river flows and how we  should learn that any attempts to dam it will only  result in it overflowing and inundating fields. It is  always better to allow it to flow to the sea.” 

    “The workshop also reinforced the importance of  relationships when it came to dealing with conflict  but went on the further to examine effective ap‐ proaches in negotiation and mediation,” she said.  

    “Overall, I was just very grateful to have been given  the opportunity to participate and thank the organ‐ isers for convening such a rewarding training,” Vani  said.  

    Left :

    DF Communica- tions and Research Officer, Vani Catana- siga enjoys a light moment at the PCP Negotia- tion and Media- tion Training with PCP Staff, Priscilla Singh.

    Photo source :

    Netani Rika

  • 3

    PAGE 3 VOLUME 1, ISSUE 4

    For me, attending the dialogue event was monu‐ mental in that it finally gave me the courage to  finally speak.  How is this significant? In my 37  years of marriage, I played the submissive wife,  enduring an abusive marriage silently. It was no  wonder  I was depressed and sickly most of the  time. 

    After attending the three‐day dialogue event, I  realised the power to change the situation was  really within my grasp and dialogue was indeed a  tool I could use to reclaim my life as an individual.  

    I did this very simply by honestly and respectfully  expressing the feelings I had kept bottled up for  years to my husband. I did this even to the point  of asking my husband to consider whether I really 

    deserved the treatment I had endured  for dec‐ ades. As I did that, I also balanced it by letting him  know that I now understood that as an individual,  I had every right to a decent and abuse free life.  

    My husband took a while to process this as he  remained silent throughout that conversation. It  was a relief to be able to voice feelings that I had  kept within me for years and so after airing all  that I left to attend to a business call. 

    Imagine my surprise when I returned home to  find all the household chores done and even more  a cup of tea waiting for me. It was

View more