EPortfolio Research Team: Common Understandings. ePortfolios are in their infancy Conversations with individuals and institutions involved with ePortfolios.

EPortfolio Research Team: Common Understandings. ePortfolios are in their infancy Conversations with individuals and institutions involved with ePortfolios. slide 0
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  • ePortfolio Research Team:Common Understandings

  • ePortfolios are in their infancyConversations with individuals and institutions involved with ePortfolios have revealed that people across the country are in the beginning stages of this processThey too are grappling with the very same questions we are posingThere are not yet institutionalized answers to many of our questions

  • Clarity of PurposeLaGuardia has identified many purposes for the portfolio including: an institutional assessment tool, a student performance assessment tool, a transfer tool, and a resume-building toolOur research has pointed us toward the need for a more focused purposeA rationale for the ePortfolio needs to be articulated to the college community

  • Institutions and their use of ePortfolios:AAHE ePortfolio ClearinghouseAlvernoElonKalamazooWesleyan

  • Institutional Culture of ePortfoliosFaculty must be involved early on in the process of development and implementationStudents must be involved early on in the process of development and implementationLinking core competencies to curriculum and faculty development efforts is crucial to ensure widespread implementation, practice, and sustainabilityA common language centered around ePortfolios and core competencies must be developed and spoken throughout the college community

  • Institutional Culture of ePortfolios (continued)The ePortfolio may require rethinking courses, curriculum, and student and faculty lifeSuccessful implementation requires a transformation of the institutional culture; implementing a practice of reflection within an institution that values action and innovation may prove to be an initial struggle

  • ReflectionA collection of on-line documents is a virtual file-cabinet; a collection of on-line documents with a carefully written reflective piece is a portfolio Teaching students how to write the reflective piece has proven difficult at other institutions

  • Ideal Practices/Hard QuestionsShould ePortfolios be required?In what other ways can we successfully structure the ePortfolio without the ePortfolio becoming a barrier to student graduation?Should ePortfolios be housed in credit-bearing, content courses?Should ePortfolios be assessed at different benchmarks throughout a students career?How do we imbed reflection in the curriculum?How do we attract wide-spread institutional commitment?

  • No Longer QuestionsPaper versus Digital: Digital wins the dayPlagiarism: Plagiarism is plagiarismThe initial benchmark needs to take place almost immediately and in a credit-bearing, content courseThe subsequent benchmarks should follow quickly to allow students to engage in a sustained ePortfolio processPrivacy concerns: The software we choose will help to deal with this issueThe ePortfolio does require more workSince ePortfolios are primarily used at four year or university institutions, they are not using them for transferwhat we decide to do may define this practice

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