Facilitating workshops

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ACES training on how to be a good facilitator in research contexts

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<ul><li> 1. Facilitating Stakeholder WorkshopsWhat makes stakeholder participation ustainable Uplandsin environmental management work?nvolved Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 2. 1. Important Terms </li> <li> 3. What are stakeholders? Anyone who can affect or be affected by a decision or action (after Freeman, 1984) ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 4. What is stakeholder participation? A process where stakeholders (e.g. individuals, groups and organisations) choose to take an active role in making decisions that affect them (After Wandersman 1981; Wilcox 2003; Rowe et al. 2004) ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 5. 2. Basics of Participationustainable UplandsLearning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 6. Different levels/types of participation in community planningThe ladder of participation (Arnstein, 1969) ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 7. Different levels/types of participationThe wheel of participation (Wilcox, 2003) ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 8. Different levels/types of participationCommunication flows (Rowe &amp; Frewer, 2000) Facilitators Stakeholders Communication Facilitators Stakeholders Consultation Facilitators Stakeholders Participation ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 9. Why engage stakeholders? Participation is increasingly embedded in policy for the normative &amp; pragmatic reasons discussed A democratic right e.g. Aarhus Convention Higher quality and more durable decisions ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 10. Challenges and disillusionment Empowering marginalised may interact with existing power structures to cause unintended consequences Group dynamics may create dysfunctional consensus Consultation fatigue as poorly run processes fail to deliver change ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 11. Evidence for claims of participation? Few claims have been tested, but there is firm evidence that effective participation can enhance: Quality of decisions: due to more comprehensive information inputs Durability of decisions: due to stakeholder buy-in But, decision quality and durability are highly dependant on the quality of the process leading to them ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 12. Tools vs overall process Participation is more than a collection of tools and methods for engaging stakeholdersustainable UplandsLearning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 13. ustainable UplandsLearning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 14. 1. Start talking to people as soon as you can From concept to completion Early involvement leads to higher quality and more durable decisions Avoid raising false expectations: make sure theres something to negotiate What makes stakeholder participation in environmental management work? nvolved </li> <li> 15. 2. Make sure youre talking to the right people The nature and legitimacy of outcomes is significantly affected by participant mix Lots of methods available now for stakeholder analysis What makes stakeholder participation in environmental management work? nvolved </li> <li> 16. 3. Make sure you know Design the what people want to process to the talk about goals Identify goals with stakeholders Be prepared to negotiate and compromise Partnerships, ownership and active engagement in the process is What makes stakeholder participation in environmental management work? more likely nvolved </li> <li> 17. Communicate e.g. information dissemination via leaflets or the mass media, hotlines and public meetings4. Be flexible: Consult e.g. consultation documents, base level of opinion polls and referendums, focus groups participation and surveys &amp; methods on Participate your context e.g. citizens juries, consensus &amp; objectives conferences, task-forces and public meetings with voting Tailor your methods to context What makes stakeholder participation in environmental management work? Manage power nvolved </li> <li> 18. The outcome of a participatory process is more sensitive to the manner in which it is conducted than the tools that are used Dont underestimate the power of investing in a good facilitator to bring people together and deliver high quality outcomes What makes stakeholder participation 5. Get a facilitator in environmental management work? nvolved </li> <li> 19. 6. Put local and scientific knowledge on an equal footing Science can help people make more informed decisions Local knowledge can question assumptions, and perhaps lead to more rigorous science What makes stakeholder participation in environmental management work? nvolved </li> <li> 20. Decisions based on a combination of local and scientific knowledge may by more robust due to more comprehensive information inputs What makes stakeholder participation in environmental management work? nvolved </li> <li> 21. 3. Overcoming barriers to participation </li> <li> 22. Barriers to participation Practical: lack of time, money, skills Stakeholder fatigue, apathy based onIncreasingly tractable negative former experiences Fear of losing control, unwanted/biased outcomes World view (or epistemology): Reductionists, in search of universal truth, find it hard to value local knowledge and multiple perspectives If you know whats right, why consult? Often related to disciplinary background, but more about the way people construct &amp; perceive knowledge </li> <li> 23. Barriers to participation Practical: lack of time, money, skills Stakeholder fatigue, apathy based onIncreasingly tractable negative former experiences Fear of losing control, unwanted/biased outcomes World view (or epistemology): Reductionists, in search of universal truth, find it hard to value local knowledge and multiple perspectives If you know whats right, why consult? Often related to disciplinary background, but more about the way people construct &amp; perceive knowledge </li> <li> 24. Overcoming barriers Deeper issues may take generations to change But most of these are tractable issues Practical we can make time/money and good practice skills available Stakeholder scepticism: replacing bad with good practice, negative with positive experiences Decision-maker scepticism: good practice can set boundaries (avoid raising false expectations via participation if no alternatives) and minimise bias The key: identifying, spreading and facilitating good practice </li> <li> 25. 4. Planning &amp; Facilitating Events What makes stakeholder participation in environmental management work? nvolved </li> <li> 26. 4a. Process DesignIncludes some material based on a Dialogue Matters course (Diana Pound), with help from Ros Bryce ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 27. What is important in planning an event? The GROW Model* Goal What is the issue to be addressed? Reality Where are you now? Options Possible options? actionactionaction ? Will What will you do?* Sir John Whitmore, Coaching for Performance: GROWing People, Performance and Purpose (Nicholas Brealey, 2002) ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 28. Goals What do you want to achieve? What do you want to change? How will you know if youve been successful? When do you want to have achieved your goal? ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 29. Reality What is happening at the moment? How have you verified this is true? What are you achieving at present? What action have you taken on this so far? What were the effects of this action? ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 30. Options What actions could you take to move forward? What strategies have worked before in similar circumstances? If no barriers or limitations existed, what would you do? Which step will give the best result? Advantages/disadvantages of this step? Which option will you work on first? ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 31. Will What are you going to do? When are you going to do it? What help do you need? Who will you involve? What might prevent you from taking this step? How can you overcome this? ustainable Uplands Learning to manage future change www.see.leeds.ac.uk/sustainableuplands </li> <li> 32. What is important in planni...</li></ul>