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District Report Card for Grades K-12 Mitchell, South Dakota Published Fall, 2016 DEMOGRAPHICS OF OUR SCHOOL DISTRICT NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED, K-12 ENROLLMENT NUMBERS 2005-06 2517 2006-07 2502 2007-08 2465 2008-09 2433 2009-10 2465 2010-11 2482 2011-12 2540 2012-13 2596 2013-14 2710 2014-15 2747 2015-16 2785 SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS OF STUDENTS 2015-16 % of Students Eligible for Free and Reduced Building _______ Lunches ________ 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 Elementary……… 49% 44% 47% 44% 47% Middle School….. 41% 35% 34% 38% 36% Senior High*…….. 28% 23% 25% 28% 24% *A lower rate of free and reduced lunch eligibility at the Senior High is due, in part, to the availability of open lunch at that level. STUDENT ATTENDANCE RATE ATTENDANCE CENTER 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 Elementary 95.7% 96.1% 96.1% 96.0% 95.8% 96.3% 96.5% Middle School 95.5% 95.4% 95.8% 95.7% 95.5% 95.1% 95.3% Senior High 94.4% 94.8% 94.7% 95.3% 94.7% 94.6% 95.2% 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 05- 06 06- 07 07- 08 08- 09 09- 10 10- 11 11- 12 12- 13 13- 14 14- 15 15- 16 2015-16 STUDENTS BY BUILDING 395 Longfellow Elementary School 427 Gertie Belle Rogers Elementary School 539 L.B. Williams Elementary School 18 Rockport Colony School 18 Rosedale Colony School 585 Mitchell Middle School 778 Mitchell Senior High School 25 Abbott House 2785 Total 1

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Page 1: Fall 2016 District Report Card

District Report Card for Grades K-12

Mitchell, South Dakota

Published Fall, 2016

DEMOGRAPHICS OF OUR SCHOOL DISTRICT

NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED, K-12 ENROLLMENT NUMBERS

2005-06 2517

2006-07 2502

2007-08 2465

2008-09 2433

2009-10 2465

2010-11 2482

2011-12 2540

2012-13 2596

2013-14 2710

2014-15 2747

2015-16 2785

SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS OF STUDENTS

2015-16

% of Students Eligible

for Free and Reduced

Building _______ Lunches ________

11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16

Elementary……… 49% 44% 47% 44% 47%

Middle School….. 41% 35% 34% 38% 36%

Senior High*…….. 28% 23% 25% 28% 24%

*A lower rate of free and reduced lunch eligibility at the

Senior High is due, in part, to the availability of open lunch

at that level.

STUDENT ATTENDANCE RATE

ATTENDANCE CENTER 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016

Elementary 95.7% 96.1% 96.1% 96.0% 95.8% 96.3% 96.5%

Middle School 95.5% 95.4% 95.8% 95.7% 95.5% 95.1% 95.3%

Senior High 94.4% 94.8% 94.7% 95.3% 94.7% 94.6% 95.2%

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11-

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2015-16 STUDENTS BY BUILDING

395 Longfellow Elementary School

427 Gertie Belle Rogers Elementary School

539 L.B. Williams Elementary School

18 Rockport Colony School

18 Rosedale Colony School

585 Mitchell Middle School

778 Mitchell Senior High School

25 Abbott House

2785 Total

1

Page 2: Fall 2016 District Report Card

ETHNIC MAKE-UP

ETHNICITY 2011-12 2012-13 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016

American Indian 189= 6.6% 193= 7.1% 168=5.9% 163=5.9% 156=5.6%

Asian or Pacific Islander 30= 1.0% 28=1.0% 30= 1.0% 24=0.9% 34= 1.2%

Hispanic 84= 2.9% 104=3.8% 100= 3.5% 101=3.7% 125= 4.5%

Black, Not Hispanic Origin 31= 1.1% 33=1.2% 35= 1.2% 28=1.0% 33= 1.2%

Two or more races 14= 0.5% 27=1.0% 21= 0.7% 60=2.2% 67= 2.4%

White, Not Hispanic Origin 2528= 87.9% 2339=85.9% 2518= 87.7% 2371=86.3% 2,370= 85.1%

Total 2876= 100% 2726=100% 2872= 100% 2747=100% 2785 = 100%

SPECIAL EDUCATION ENROLLMENT

Students Served in Special Education: 2015-16

DISABILITY CATEGORY NUMBER OF STUDENTS PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL STUDENTS*

Deafness and Blindness 0 0.0%

Emotional Disturbance 14 0.5%

Cognitive Disability 42 1.5%

Hearing Loss 2 0.1%

Specific Learning Disability 104 3.7%

Multiple Disabilities 2 0.1%

Orthopedic Impairments 0 0.0%

Visually Impairments 1 0.0%

Deafness 2 0.1%

Speech/Language Impairments 141 5.1%

Other Health Impaired 29 1.0%

Autism 33 1.2%

Traumatic Brain Injury 1 0.0%

Developmental Delay-Preschool 39 1.4%

Total 410 14.7%

* Percentage is rounded to the nearest tenth.

Percentages based on December 1, 2015 childcount numbers.

FIVE YEAR TOTALS FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

2011-12 2012-13 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016

Number of Special

Education Students

361 380 394 377 410

Percent of Total Population 14.3% 14.6% 14.6% 13.7% 14.7%

All K-12 Students 2540 2596 2694 2747 2785

2

Page 3: Fall 2016 District Report Card

HOME SCHOOLERS/PUBLIC SCHOOL EXEMPTIONS

GRADUATION RATES

Four Year Cohort Graduation Rate* High School Completion rate **

MITCHELL STATE MITCHELL STATE

2012 93.6% 83.2% 2014 97.04% 89.99%

2013 93.4% 82.3% 2015 94.8% 90.1%

2014 93.9% 82.7% 2016 94.5% 90.3%

2015 92.7% 83.9%

2016 93.1% 84.1%

*Percentage of student who graduate in 4 years plus a summer

**Percentage of students who completed high school overall.

2015-16 ENGLISH-AS-A-SECOND-LANGUAGE STUDENTS

GRADE

HUTTERISCHE

SPANISH

German Japanese Laotian

Mandarin

Chinese

Kindergarten 1 9 1 0 0 0

1st Grade 5 7 0 0 0 0

2nd Grade 4 1 0 0 0 0

3rd Grade 6 5 0 0 1 0

4th Grade 6 3 0 0 0 0

5th Grade 3 1 0 1 0 0

6th Grade 3 1 1 1 1 0

7th Grade 2 0 0 0 0 0

8th Grade 3 1 1 0 0 1

9th Grade 0 0 0 0 0 0

10th Grade 0 1 0 0 0 0

11th Grade 0 0 0 0 0 0

12th Grade 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 33 29 3 2 2 1

35 38

51 54

38

5864 60

76

60

0

20

40

60

80

2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

0 %

2 0 %

4 0 %

6 0 %

8 0 %

10 0 %

2 0 12 2 0 13 2 0 14 2 0 15 2 0 16

l oc a l

st a t e

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

2014 2015 2016

local

state

3

Page 4: Fall 2016 District Report Card

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT OF OUR SCHOOL DISTRICT

Building and District Reports on the Next Generation Accountability Model:

In the following pages, pp. 5-13, you will find a report on the success of each building, as well as the Mitchell District and

South Dakota at large, on the Next Generation Accountability Model. The NGAM is the model which holds schools

accountable both for student achievement as well as a few other educational factors. This statewide accountability system is not

based on student achievement alone but also the percentage of K-8 students who attend at least 94% of all the days of school

and the percentage of students who graduate from high school.

School Alert Status

School School Designation*

Rockport Colony School Exemplary School

Rosedale Colony School Small School

Gertie Belle Rogers Elementary School Status School

L.B. Williams Elementary School Progressing School

Longfellow Elementary School Progressing School

Mitchell Middle School Progressing School

Mitchell Senior High School Progressing School

Based on these criteria, no Mitchell Schools were considered at-risk. One Mitchell School, Gertie Belle Rogers Elementary,

was deemed to be in the top 10% of all schools in the State. Another Mitchell School, Rockport Elementary School, was

deemed to be exemplary, i.e. in the top 5% of all schools in the State.

Conclusions:

1. Mitchell attendance centers exceeded state goals at every level.

* What do these designations mean?

An Exemplary School has a School Performance Index score in the top 5% of schools in S.D.

A Status School has a School Performance Index score in the top 10% of schools in S.D.

A Progressing School has a School Performance Index score between the bottom 5% and top 10% of schools in S.D.

A small School has too few students to be provided a designation.

2. Proficiency rates listed are the sum of all students who were rated ‘proficient’ or ‘advanced’ in reading and math.

3. Mitchell proficiency rates are consistently higher than state averages.

4. All Mitchell School District school buildings set a goal to increase proficiency rates in both reading and math by 5

percentage points in the spring, 2016 testing.

Summary of Reading and Math Proficiency Percentages

For 2015 and 2016 Smarter Balanced Assessment for Mitchell School District:

Reading/ELA State Average Math State Average

2015 Grade 3 68% 49% 70% 51%

2016 Grade 3 63% 50% 66% 54%

2015 Grade 4 61% 45% 55% 46%

2016 Grade 4 65% 50% 57% 48%

2015 Grade 5 62% 49% 55% 37%

2016 Grade 5 52% 50% 47% 38%

2015 Grade 6 43% 45% 48% 34%

2016 Grade 6 56% 51% 57% 41%

2015 Grade 7 53% 49% 50% 39%

2016 Grade 7 52% 52% 56% 42%

2015 Grade 8 59% 48% 59% 39%

2016 Grade 8 47% 52% 49% 42%

2015 Grade 11 63% 59% 45% 38%

2016 Grade 11 61% 61% 46% 38%

4

Page 5: Fall 2016 District Report Card

School Performance Index

Exemplary Schools 1 / 7 Schools

14.29%

District Classification:-

Status Schools 1 / 7 Schools

14.29%

Progressing Schools 4 / 7 Schools

57.14%

Priority Schools 0 / 7 Schools

0.00%

Focus Schools 0 / 7 Schools

0.00%

Small Schools 0 / 7 Schools

0.00%

Performance Indicators

* No bar will display at the school or district level if the subgroup does not meet minimum size for reporting purposes.

1 61ofReport Generated: 9/27/2016

Mitchell 17-2

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

5

Page 6: Fall 2016 District Report Card

School Performance Index

SPI Total Points62.83%

62.83 out of possible 100

Academic Growth49.30%

19.72 out of possible 40

Attendance83.63%

16.73 out of possible 20

Student Achievement65.95%

26.38 out of possible 40

Performance Indicators

* No bar will display at the school or district level if the subgroup does not meet minimum size for reporting purposes.

School Classification: Status Title I Designation: Schoolwide

1 33ofReport Generated: 9/27/2016

Mitchell 17-2 | Gertie Belle Rogers Elementary - 04

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

6

Page 7: Fall 2016 District Report Card

School Performance Index

SPI Total Points55.40%

55.4 out of possible 100

Academic Growth34.83%

13.93 out of possible 40

Attendance82.28%

16.46 out of possible 20

Student Achievement62.52%

25.01 out of possible 40

Performance Indicators

* No bar will display at the school or district level if the subgroup does not meet minimum size for reporting purposes.

School Classification: Progressing Title I Designation: Targeted Assistance

1 33ofReport Generated: 9/27/2016

Mitchell 17-2 | L.B. Williams Elementary - 03

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

7

Page 8: Fall 2016 District Report Card

School Performance Index

SPI Total Points56.25%

56.25 out of possible 100

Academic Growth47.25%

18.9 out of possible 40

Attendance81.95%

16.39 out of possible 20

Student Achievement52.40%

20.96 out of possible 40

Performance Indicators

* No bar will display at the school or district level if the subgroup does not meet minimum size for reporting purposes.

School Classification: Progressing Title I Designation: Schoolwide

1 33ofReport Generated: 9/27/2016

Mitchell 17-2 | Longfellow Elementary - 05

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

8

Page 9: Fall 2016 District Report Card

School Performance Index

SPI Total Points63.93%

63.93 out of possible 100

Academic Growth35.83%

14.33 out of possible 40

Attendance100.00%

20 out of possible 20

Student Achievement74.00%

29.6 out of possible 40

Performance Indicators

* No bar will display at the school or district level if the subgroup does not meet minimum size for reporting purposes.

School Classification: Exemplary High Performance

Title I Designation: Targeted Assistance

1 47ofReport Generated: 9/27/2016

Mitchell 17-2 | Rockport Colony Elementary - 10

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

9

Page 10: Fall 2016 District Report Card

School Performance Index

SPI Total Points88.89%

88.89 out of possible 100

Academic Growth0.00%

Schools with fewer than 10 students for Academic Growth are exempt from this indicator.

Attendance100.00%

20 out of possible 20

Student Achievement86.11%

68.89 out of possible 80

Performance Indicators

* No bar will display at the school or district level if the subgroup does not meet minimum size for reporting purposes.

School Classification: To Be Determined Title I Designation: Targeted Assistance

1 41ofReport Generated: 9/27/2016

Mitchell 17-2 | Rosedale Colony Elementary - 11

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

10

Page 11: Fall 2016 District Report Card

School Performance Index

SPI Total Points54.12%

54.12 out of possible 100

Academic Growth44.10%

17.64 out of possible 40

Attendance76.52%

15.3 out of possible 20

Student Achievement52.95%

21.18 out of possible 40

Performance Indicators

* No bar will display at the school or district level if the subgroup does not meet minimum size for reporting purposes.

School Classification: Progressing Title I Designation: Non-Title I

1 33ofReport Generated: 9/27/2016

Mitchell 17-2 | Mitchell Middle School - 02

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

11

Page 12: Fall 2016 District Report Card

School Performance Index

SPI Total Points71.52%

71.52 out of possible 100

College and Career Readiness71.57%

21.47 out of possible 30

High School Completion Indicator94.27%

28.28 out of possible 30

Student Achievement54.42%

21.77 out of possible 40

Performance Indicators

* No bar will display at the school or district level if the subgroup does not meet minimum size for reporting purposes.

School Classification: Progressing Title I Designation: Non-Title I

1 27ofReport Generated: 9/27/2016

Mitchell 17-2 | Mitchell High School - 01

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

12

Page 13: Fall 2016 District Report Card

School Performance Index

Exemplary Schools 34 / 660 Schools

5.15%

Status Schools 33 / 660 Schools

5.00%

Progressing Schools 453 / 660 Schools

68.64%

Priority Schools 29 / 660 Schools

4.39%

Focus Schools 33 / 660 Schools

5.00%

Priority Districts 6 / 150 Districts

4.00%

Small Schools 16 / 660 Schools

2.42%

Performance Indicators

* No bar will display at the school or district level if the subgroup does not meet minimum size for reporting purposes.

1 42ofReport Generated: 9/30/2016

South Dakota DOE

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

13

Page 14: Fall 2016 District Report Card

NAEP Performance - Grade 4

60 61ofReport Generated: 9/27/2016

Mitchell 17-2

South Dakota DOE2015-2016 Report Card

14

BG071
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South Dakota Statewide Results
BG071
Typewritten Text
Page 15: Fall 2016 District Report Card

PLANS OF MITCHELL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL’S 2016 GRADUATES

PLACEMENT NUMBER OF STUDENTS

Arizona State University 1

Augustana University 5

Aveda, Madison Wisconsin 1

Black Hills State University 10

College of Saint Benedict 1

College/University/Undecided 3

Creighton University 2

Dakota State University 5

Dakota Wesleyan University 11

Indian Hills Community College 1

Iowa State University 3

Lake Area Technical Institute 7

Lincoln Technical School 1

Metro Community College 1

Mitchell Technical Institute 32

Minneapolis College of Art & Design 1

Mount Marty College 2

North Dakota State College of Science 1

North Dakota State University 2

Rochester University 1

South Dakota School of Mines 5

South Dakota State University 19

Southeast Community College 1

Southeast Technical Institute 8

Stewart’s School of Cosmetology 1

University of Minnesota 7

University of Nebraska – Lincoln 6

University of Sioux Falls 3

University of South Dakota 18

Utah State University 1

Military 5

Work 9

Undecided/Unannounced 23

Total 197

Percent of Mitchell Senior High School graduates pursuing non-Military, post-secondary studies: 81%

Percent of Mitchell Senior High School graduates entering the Military: 2%

Percent of Mitchell Senior High School graduates going directly to the workforce: 5%

Undecided or declining to report their post graduate plans: 12%

15

Page 16: Fall 2016 District Report Card

ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAM SUCCESS RATE

Mitchell Senior High School offers a number of different Advanced Placement courses, classes sufficiently rigorous that they meet college

requirements. As the conclusion of an Advanced Placement class, students may take an AP exam to determine whether or not colleges will

grant credit for the course. If students receive a ‘3’ or better, on a 1-5 scale, they will be awarded college credit by most universities.

1. AP American History: No students sat for the examination.

2. AP English: No students sat for the examination.

3. AP Calculus: No students sat for the examination.

4. AP Spanish : No students sat for the examination.

5. AP Statistics: No students sat for the examination.

Because most of these courses are offered both as Advanced Placement and dual enrollment and since the dual enrollment option guarantees

college credit with a passing grade, students have all began choosing the dual credit option. Thus, this year no students took the AP exam,

though they did enroll in the courses.

DUAL ENROLLMENT OFFERINGS

Dual credit courses are classes offered simultaneously for high school and post-secondary credit. Students who successfully

complete courses in this program will have a post-secondary transcript that can be used to matriculate into many colleges and

universities.

During the 2015-16 school year, the following dual enrollment courses were offered at Mitchell High School:

Course: Possible College Credits: Credit-Granting Post-Secondary:

Digital Electronics 4 Augustana Univeristy

Human Body Systems 4 Augustana University

Introduction to Engineering 4 Augustana University

Medical Interventions 4 Augustana University

Principles of Engineering 4 Augustana University

Principles of Biomedical Science 4 Augustana Univeristy

Advanced Art Design 3 Northern State University

Advanced Biology 4 Northern State University

U.S. History 6 Northern State University

Computer Application III 3 Northern State University

College Algebra 3 Northern State University

Calculus 3 Dakota Wesleyan University

Introduction to Sports Medicine 2 Dakota Wesleyan University

Survey of Health 2 Dakota Wesleyan University

Pols 153/AP American Government 3 Dakota Wesleyan University

Bio 220 Anatomy and Physiology 3 Dakota Wesleyan University

Spanish III, IV, V 9 Dakota Wesleyan University

Graphic Design 3 Dakota Wesleyan University

Photography 3 Dakota Wesleyan University

English Lit/Comp./ AP English 3 Dakota Wesleyan University

Statistics I 3 Dakota Wesleyan University

Nutrition and Wellness 3 Mitchell Technical Institute

Welding 3,4 and 5 1 Mitchell Technical Institute

General Service Technician 3 Mitchell Technical Institute

Intro to Architectural Drafting 1 Mitchell Technical Institute

Cabinet Making 2 Mitchell Technical Institute

Additionally, the following classes will be offered during both the summer and school year, at MHS as on-line courses for high

school credit: Personal Finance, Ancient World History, and Modern World History.

16

Page 17: Fall 2016 District Report Card

MITCHELL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT ON THE ACT TEST YEAR MITCHELL AVERAGE SCORE STATE AVERAGE SCORE NATIONAL AVERAGE SCORE

2011-12 23.0 21.8 21.1

2012-13 23.1 21.9 21.1

2013-14 22.4 21.9 21.1

2014-15 22.6 21.9 21.1

2015-16 22.4 21.9 20.8

Average 22.7 21.9 21.0

Conclusions: Mitchell students score well above state averages and significantly above national averages.

MHS COLLEGE FRESHMAN GPA AT S.D. PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES

GRADE

MITCHELL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

GRADUATE GPA

SOUTH DAKOTA

GRADUATE GPA

Class of 2010 2.89 3.02

Class of 2011 3.27 3.04

Class of 2012 3.23 3.04

Class of 2013 3.09 3.06

Class of 2014 2.99 3.08

Average 3.09 3.05

Conclusions: Mitchell graduates earn slightly higher grades in their freshmen year of college compared to their South

Dakota counterparts. Placements from these GPA’s are only considered for South Dakota public universities.

STUDENTS REMAINING IN REGENTAL UNIVERSITY FOR SECOND SEMESTER

Grade MHS SD

Class of 2014 84.1% 89.6%

MHS GRADUATES NEEDING REMEDIAL HELP IN MATHEMATICS AT S.D. PUBLIC

UNIVERSITIES

GRADE

MITCHELL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

GRADUATE PERCENT

SOUTH DAKOTA

GRADUATE PERCENT

Class of 2010 9 students/ 16.36% 26.45%

Class of 2011 9 students/ 23.8% 24.87

Class of 2012 10 students/ 19.6% 23.33%

Class of 2013 7 students/ 14.8% 24.0%

Class of 2014 11 students/ 17.5% 23.8%

MHS GRADUATES NEEDING REMEDIAL HELP IN ENGLISH AT S.D. PUBLIC

UNIVERSITIES

GRADE

MITCHELL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

GRADUATE PERCENT

SOUTH DAKOTA

GRADUATE PERCENT

Class of 2010 4 students/ 7.27% 14.22%

Class of 2011 6 students/ 15.38% 14.7%

Class of 2012 6 students/ 11.76% 13.66%

Class of 2013 7 students/ 13.1% 15.3%

Class of 2014 8 students/ 12.7% 15.5%

OPPORTUNITY SCHOLARS, REGENT SCHOLARS AND AP COURSEWORK MHS SD

Opportunity Scholars 23.8% 33.7%

Regent Scholar 34.9% 39.4%

AP Coursework 0% 18%

Conclusions:

1. While MHS grads are typically more likely than S.D, students in general, to remain enrolled for the second semester, this

was not the case for the class of 2014.

2. For the last five graduating classes Mitchell High School graduates are significantly less likely to require remedial help in

math and English than S.D. students in general.

3. Traditionally MHS students were more likely than SD students in general to be Opportunity and Regent Scholars but this

was not the case for the Class of 2014.

4. The popularity of AP course work at MHS has fallen off significantly in favor of dual enrollment college courses.

17

Page 18: Fall 2016 District Report Card

Mitchell School District 17-2

K-12

2014-15 District Goals

I. Fully Implement No Child Left Behind and the South Dakota Next Generation Accountability Model

A. Maintain the percentage of highly qualified instructors at 100%.

Goal Attained. 100% of our instructors in 2015-16 were deemed highly qualified by the State Department of

Education.

B. Publish State-Generated Reports on Mitchell’s Status on the Next

Generation Accountability Model in all Required Venues

Goal Attained. Through the district report card, district website, building postings, and a myriad of other methods, we

met and exceeded the requirements for reaching out to constituency groups with our student achievement reports.

II. Meet Additional Student Achievement Goals:

A. Mitchell High School ACT scores will continue to exceed state and national averages.

Goal Attained. The MHS ACT average last year remained well above state and national averages.

B. All schools will annually participate in student achievement data

retreats. These retreats will include reviews of both student achievement data as well as other metrics

included in the Next Generation Accountability Model.

Goal Attained. Student achievement data retreats were held for all school buildings during pre-service activities in

the fall of 2016.

C. Through the use of ongoing assessment, including STARS and

ALEKS, all schools will produce student assessment data to better inform instruction and provide

quantifiable, continuous (approaching real-time) feedback on student achievement progress.

Goal Attained but with Mixed Results: The school district did provide the necessary software—STARS and ALEKS—so

that formative reading and math data was provided to teachers based upon their ongoing assessments of students

during the school year. For any number of reasons (insufficient training in the use of the data, failure to appreciate or

recognize its utility, mismatch between the data and the information needed to make sound use of it, lack of time for

inclusion of such data in instructional planning, etc.), however, the use of the data to guide instruction was spotty

with some teachers applying the data widely and intensively and others treating it as little more than an interesting

snapshot. More work is needed in this area if formative assessment is ever to become an engine for individualization

and mass customized learning.

III. Develop and implement a district-wide professional development plan.

A. As one component of this plan, continue the Kernel Innovation to Develop Success KIDS

Grant program begun in 2015 by Curriculum Director, Sherri Becker and funded by private

benefactors.

Goal Met and Exceeded. After the success of the program in year 1, awarding over $12,000 to 7 different programs

and10 teachers including at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels, the program was continued for a

second year with generous donations from Innovative Systems, BankWest, 1st National Bank, Mitchell Telecom, Dr. Phil

and Sherri Becker, and CorTrust.

IV. Develop and implement a 5-year facilities plan, including projected

expenditures for capital outlay in the areas of textbooks, transportation,

buildings and grounds, extracurricular needs, building-level needs, and technology.

Goal Attained. During the 2-15-16 school year, a new 5-year plan was developed for all of the listed areas and

successfully implemented.

A. With MTI fully transitioned to its new interstate campus, continue to transform the current north campus into a

regional career and technical education center, operated by Mitchell Technical Institute for Mitchell High

School students and open to area high school students. Having offered programs in welding, culinary arts,

PLTW engineering, PLTW biomedical, health science, construction, agriculture, and auto mechanics as of the

fall of 2014, add coursework in cabinet-making and careers in residential construction for the fall of 2015, and

consider adding an information technology (IT) program in the future.

Goal Met. All of the programs listed continued to be offered with full and even growing enrollments in 2015-16.

MCTEA leadership considered adding IT this last year but made the decision to maintain that program within the

traditional high school format at the regular high school building.

B. Complete phase I of the MHS parking lot replacement.

Goal Met. Phase I was completed during the summer of 2016.

C. Complete the construction of the MHS performing arts center, with a ‘move-in’ goal of December, 2016.

Goal Met/In Progress. While the PAC is not yet complete, of course, the project remains on budget and on schedule

for completion by Christmas of 2016.

V. Technology:

A. Continue the 6-12 1:1 technology initiative, moving toward a 1:1 initiative in grades K-5 with full

elementary implementation for the 2017-18 school year.

18

Page 19: Fall 2016 District Report Card

Goal met/In Progress. The 6-12 1:1 program was continued, with new iPads for the middle school in the fall of 2016

and new laptops for MHS scheduled for the fall of 2017. The K-5 initiative will likely be met through Chromebooks, with

Longfellow fully in place as of the fall of 2016 and LBW and GBR scheduled for the fall of 2017.

B. Support elementary, middle school, and senior high mass customized learning and problem-based

learning initiatives with appropriate 1:1 technology.

Goal Attained. Due to the individualized needs of such programs, 1:1 technology has been provided to these

programs.

VI. Lunch Program Goals:

A. Boost student participation in the school lunch program by five

percentage points (lunch), while maintaining or increasing the fund balance in that program.

Goal Not Attained/Goal Exceeded. In terms of lunch participation rates, numbers increased but by less than 5

percentage points at the elementary level, remained constant at the middle school, and fell significantly at the high

school. Thus, this part of the goal was not attained. In terms of the fund balance, however, the goal was exceeded

as that increased by $33,623 or just under 25%. Enhanced participation rates will be a priority for food service

director, Leann Carmody, in 2016-17.

B. Comply with new federal regulations on nutritional content and meal

pricing while improving student participation rates.

Goal Met/Goal Not Attained. All federal regulations on nutritional content and meal pricing were met. Participation

rate improvements were only partially met, as noted immediately above.

VII. Maintain the current strong financial condition of district finances with the

following objectives in mind:

A. Maintain a cash reserve at or above 25% of total expenditures.

Goal Met. The cash reserve, while having declined in 2015-16, remained above 25%.

B. Forego use of the opt-out levying authority for the 2016 and 2017 calendar years.

Goal Met. No opt-out dollars were levied for the 2016 or 2017 calendar years.

VIII. Regularly review K-12 and MTI board policies so that all are reviewed

every five years. Review series 400-600 during the summer of 2016.

Goal Met. The 400-600 policy series were reviewed by the board during the summer of 2016.

IX. Implement the new state-mandate teacher evaluation system at all

buildings, consistent with the Charlotte-Danielson Model.

Goal Met. The Charlotte Danielson Model was implemented at all buildings during the 2015-16 school year. While

some ‘bugs’ are still being worked out, implementation will continue in 2016-17.

IX. Program Level Goals:

A. Gertie Belle Rogers Elementary School:

1. Implement the S.D. Next Generation Accountability Model.

Goal met. GBR complied fully with all expectations of the S.D. NGA Model.

2. As measured by the Smarter Balance state assessment, 72% of 3-5 students will be proficient or

advanced in reading and 68% in mathematics on the spring, 2016 testing.

Goal Unmet. Proficiency/advanced rates were 64% in reading (an actual decline compared to the previous year)

and 67% in math (a significant increase from the prior year but still not enough to reach the 68% goal).

3. As measured by the STARS assessment, 95% of K-5 studentswill achieve at least one-year’s growth,

between the fall, 2015 and spring, 2016 assessments in reading and mathematics or score two grade

levels or more above their grade level.

Goal Unmet. In both reading and math, 90% of students achieved either one year’s growth and/or achieved at 2 or

more grade levels above their own. While this did not meet the overall growth goal, it is still a very strong percentage

of students who achieved or exceeded the desired growth.

4. Continue the implementation of the Olweus anti-bullying program with all students, parents, and

employees.

Goal met. Olweus director and district prevention specialist, Samantha Olson, worked with GBR faculty,

administration, and students to continue the successful implementation of the anti-bullying program in that building.

5. Implement problem-based learning in one section of each grade

level. Evaluate the success of PBL through student

assessment data analyses (Smarter Balanced and STARS)

to inform future PBL decisions.

Goal met/Revised. Indeed, a section of PBL was implemented at each grade level last year but the idea soon

morphed into a Personalized Learning (PL) classroom to be implemented in grades 1-5 at GBR for the 2016-17 school

year. That initiative was underway as of the start of the new school year.

B. L.B. Williams Elementary:

1. Implement the S.D. Next Generation Accountability Model.

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Goal met. LBW complied fully with all expectations of the S.D. NGA Model.

2. As measured by the Smarter Balance state assessment, 67% of 3-5 students will be proficient or

advanced in reading and 65% in mathematics on the spring, 2016 testing.

Goal Unmet. Proficiency/advanced rates were 63% in reading (a small increase compared to the previous year)

and 64% in math (a significant increase from the prior year but still not enough to reach the 65% goal).

3. As measured by the STARS assessment, 95% of K-5 students will achieve at least one-year’s growth,

between the fall, 2015 and spring, 2016 assessments in reading and mathematics or score two grade

levels or more above their grade level.

Goal Unmet. In reading and math, 89% and 90% of students, respectively, achieved either one year’s growth and/or

achieved at 2 or more grade levels above their own. While this did not meet the overall growth goal, it is still a very

strong percentage of students who achieved or exceeded the desired growth.

6. Continue the implementation of the Olweus anti-bullying program with all students, parents,

and employees.

Goal met. Olweus director and district prevention specialist, Samantha Olson, worked with LBW faculty,

administration, and students to continue the successful implementation of the anti-bullying program in that building.

7. Continue to implement problem-based learning in one section of grades K-5. Assess the

efficacy of the program both in terms of costs and student achievement compared to

traditional instruction and consider expansion based upon those assessments.

Goal met. The PBL model was again implemented in one or more sections of grades K-5 during the 2015-16 school

year. The costs of the program were on a par with the cost of traditional programs and thus PBL was successful in that

aspect. Additionally, students in PBL classrooms achieved at a similar level and rate as those in traditional classrooms.

Any future expansion of the program will occur only to the extent that parent/student demand calls for it.

C. Longfellow:

1. Implement the S.D. Next Generation Accountability Model.

Goal met. Longfellow complied fully with all expectations of the S.D. NGA Model.

2. As measured by the Smarter Balance state assessment, 59% of 3-5 students will be proficient or

advanced in reading and 53% in mathematics on the spring, 2016 testing.

Goal Unmet. Proficiency/advanced rates were 55% in reading (a slight increase compared to the previous year)

and 45% in math (a decrease from the prior year).

3. As measured by the STARS assessment, 85% of K-5 students will achieve at least one-year’s growth,

between the fall, 2015 and spring, 2016 assessments in reading and mathematics or score two grade

levels or more above their grade level.

Goal Exceeded. In reading and math, 93% and 87% of students, respectively, achieved either one year’s growth

and/or achieved at 2 or more grade levels above their own. Thus, Longfellow met and exceeded this goal.

4. Continue the implementation of the Olweus anti-bullying program with all students, parents, and

employees.

Goal met. A program for Olweus was held each quarter for the students. Teachers found the classroom meetings

beneficial to the success of the initiative. Working now with data from 2 years of implementation, we were able to

see improvements and areas of continued need. Mrs. Krell, our guidance counselor, gears her lessons around issues

addressed in the Olweus program.

5. Given the addition of a grades 2-3 multi-age classroom for the 2015-16 school year, evaluate the

success of this classroom through student achievement (STARS, SBA, etc.) and parent satisfaction

(surveys, enrollment interest, etc.)

Goal met. The first year of the implementation of a multi-age classroom has proven to be successful. 100% of

students made one year’s growth. 90% of students were proficient or advanced in ELA and 80% in math. Parent

surveys showed satisfaction and support for continuing with a multiage classroom at Longfellow.

6. Evaluate year 1 of the Lion’s Academy extended school year program through student

achievement and other metrics. Report on this evaluation to the school board in October, 2015.

Implement year 2 of the program during portions of the summer months, 2016.

Based upon the evaluations of years 1 and 2, as well as the availability of district and external

revenue sources, make recommendations for the program’s revision, continuation, or

discontinuation.

Goal met/In Progress. Year 2 of the Lion’s Academy extended school year was held during the summer of 2016 and

served approximately 80 students. At the time of this reporting, we do not have a final student achievement data

analysis. One major concern for the program has been the number of students who have participated in year 1 and

2. If students do not participate in the program in the long-run, i.e. over several years, the program simply cannot

succeed in its goal to eradicate student achievement gaps correlated with socio-economic status.

D. Middle School:

1. Implement the S.D. Next Generation Accountability Model.

Goal met. MMS complied fully with all expectations of the S.D. NGA Model.

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2. As measured by the Smarter Balance state assessment, 55% of 6-8 students will be proficient or

advanced in reading and

55% in mathematics on the spring, 2016 testing.

Goal Exceeded. Proficiency/advanced rates were 56% in reading and 56% in math, more than enough to meet the

full student achievement proficiency goal.

3. ‘Mine’ new student achievement data in specific subject

areas from STARS (reading) and ALEKS (mathematics) formative assessments to inform curricular

and instructional reforms.

Goal Met. Data from these sources was used immediately prior to the 2016-17 school year at a pre-service data

retreat. Additionally, STARS and ALEKS data is routinely used in the middle school classroom settings to evaluate

student learning and in decision-making on curriculum and instruction.

4. Continue the mass customized learning program through the 2015-16 school year for 6-8

graders. Use the Smarter Balanced testing data as well as formative assessments to gauge the

efficacy of the program both in terms of student achievement and costs compared to

traditional instruction.

Goal Met. In both formative assessments and SBA testing data, MCL students are achieving at levels equal to or

above that of students in traditional instruction. Additionally, participating students are regularly completing high

school coursework, with high school credit, in several subject areas, allowing them to pursue additional and more

advanced coursework when they enter the high school. Costs continue to be an issue. While the cost differential

between the traditional and MCL programs remain, it has narrowed over the last two years.

5. Implement the 1:1 technology program in all Middle School grades for the first time in 2015-16.

Goal Attained. The iPad implementation was fully in place for the 2015-16 school year, in fact from day 1, and much

of the curriculum is now taught with this technology in mind.

E. Senior High:

1. Implement the S.D. Next Generation Accountability Model.

Goal met. MHS complied fully with all expectations of the S.D. NGA Model.

2. As measured by the Smarter Balance state assessment, 66% of juniors will be proficient or

advanced in reading and 51% in mathematics on the spring, 2016 testing.

Goal Unmet. Proficiency/advanced rates were 62% in reading (a slight increase compared to the previous year)

and 48% in math (also a slight increase from the prior year but still not enough to reach the goal).

3. Utilize STAR progress monitoring to evaluate lesson effectiveness and student growth in

mathematics and English.

Goal Met in Part. Such data was collected and used to inform high school instructors at a pre-service data dig.

However, less than enthusiastic participation by students in the formative assessment throws into question the utility of

such data for making decisions on lesson effectiveness.

4. Observe all MHS classrooms on a weekly basis.

Goal met. Mr. Childs, Mr. Mock, and Mr. Thill made classroom observations/visits on at least a weekly basis.

5. Develop a plan for sustaining and even enhancing the strong, positive school climate at MHS.

Goal met. The focus of this effort was on the Student Responsibility Block (SRB) through building positive relationships

with and among students, enhancing school spirit, and even developing a sense of student ‘houses’ with the school

setting.

6. Maximize opportunities for MHS students to include:

a. Consistent with MHS’s achievement of having students enrolled in more dual enrolled

courses than any other high school in South Dakota, continue to emphasize dual credit,

Rising Scholar, and Advanced Placement course offerings at MHS as a means of enhancing

opportunities for students and maintaining rigor in the curriculum

Goal met. In fact, over 35 courses were offered in a wide range of areas—English, social sciences, CTE, mathematics,

etc.—from MTI, NSU, DWU, Augustana, and the on-line virtual high school. A large percentage of 2016 MHS seniors

graduated with post-secondary credits, some with sufficient numbers of such credits to be deemed 2nd semester

sophomores when they first stepped on a college campus.

b. Continue to consider an Information Technology program as a possible addition to the

existing CTE programs at MCTEA.

Goal met. Adding an IT program to the offerings at MCTEA was studied this past year but, in the end, the decision

was made to continue to offer computer studies within the regular school program. This decision may be revisited in

the coming years.

c. Implement the three-year Community Workforce Incentive Grant awarded to the Mitchell

School District to provide a career counselor for high school students from participating

schools as well as transportation assistance to regional school districts enrolling students at

MCTEA.

Goal met. All activities described in the CWI grant were implemented during the 2015-16 school year. The career

counselor was hired under the auspices of MTI and she made great strides in finding workplace settings for internships

and other experiences in Mitchell and the other participating communities. Additionally, the full grant allotment was

used to compensate partnering school districts for transportation costs bringing students to Mitchell to the MCTEA

campus.

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Page 22: Fall 2016 District Report Card

ACADEMIC OFFERINGS OF OUR SCHOOL DISTRICT

SUBJECT AREA GRADE

Advanced Placement English, Math, History, Spanish, and Statistics 11-12

After School Tutoring Program (LBW, Longfellow, Mitchell Middle School) K-8

Agricultural Science 9-12

Alternative School 9-12

Alternative Summer School 9-12

Architecture & Construction 9-12

Art K-12

Articulated and Dual Enrollment Classes with Mitchell Technical Institute 11-12

Auto Mechanics/Automotive systems 9-12

Business Education 9-12

Career Explorations 9-12

CCC Math and Reading Instruction K-5

Computer Studies 6, 9-12

Construction Trades 9-12

Culinary Arts 9-12

Drivers Education (summer program) 9-12

Dual Enrollment Classes with DWU, MTI, NSU, and Augustana 11-12

English/Language Arts, including Advanced Placement English K-12

Family and Consumer Sciences 7, 9-12

World Language (Spanish I-Advanced Placement Spanish) 8-12

Gifted and Talented Education K-5

Guidance and Counseling K-12

Health Education K-12

Industrial Technology 8-12

Instrumental Music 5-12

Mass Customized Learning Programs (Middle School) 6-8

Mathematics (Including AP Calculus and AP Statistics) K-12

Media Services K-12

On-line offerings in Political Science, Personal Finance, and World History 9-12

Personalized Learning Classroom (GBR) K-5

Physical Education K-12

Problem Based Learning Classrooms (LBW) K-5

Project Lead the Way Engineering 9-12

Project Lead the Way Biomedical Science 10-12

Reading K-12

Rising Scholars Dual Credit with Northern State University (Art, Computers,

Biology, AP History and College Algebra) 10-12

Robotics 9-12

Science K-12

Social Studies, including Advanced Placement History K-12

Special Education Preschool-12

Tutoring-before and after school and during the summer K-8

Vocal Music K-12

Welding 10-12

World of Work 11-12

Notice of Non-Discrimination statement:

The Mitchell School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in i ts

programs and activities and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups. The

following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies.

Ms. Brittney Eide

Assistant Principal, Mitchell Middle School

800 W. 10th Ave

Mitchell, SD 57301

(605)995-3051

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Page 23: Fall 2016 District Report Card

FACULTY OF OUR SCHOOL DISTRICT

FACULTY LEVEL OF EDUCATION

FACULTY LEVEL OF EDUCATION 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Baccalaureate Degree 27 32 45 51 55

Baccalaureate Degree + 12 Hours 13 10 8 6 5

Baccalaureate Degree + 15 Hours 9 8 4 8 9

Baccalaureate Degree + 24 Hours 20 21 23 22 19

Master’s Degree 58 52 50 44 40

Master’s Degree + 15 Hours 23 25 20 22 21

Master’s Degree + 30 Hours 12 13 14 15 14

Master’s Degree + 45 Hours 8 7 8 7 9

Master’s Degree + 60 Hours 21 21 22 20 21

Educational Specialist 0 0 0 0 0

Educational Specialist +15 0 0 0 0 0

Doctorate 0 0 1 1 1

Total 191 190 195 196 194

HIGHEST TERMINAL DEGREE 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Baccalaureate Degree 69 71 80 87 88

Master’s Degree (or higher) 122 119 115 109 106

Total 191 190 195 196 194

Fifty-five percent of Mitchell Teachers now hold a Master’s degree or higher.

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106

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

MASTER'S DEGREE

FACULTY EXPERIENCE

NUMBER OF YEARS 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 1-5 Years 26 25 35 38 38

6-10 Years 33 32 28 23 28

11-15 Years 37 28 25 32 30

16-20 Years 17 22 25 22 26

21-25 Years 33 28 24 22 17

26-30 Years 20 28 26 31 31

31-35 Years 16 14 20 17 14

36-40 Years 7 11 10 6 6

41-45 Years 2 2 2 5 4

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Page 24: Fall 2016 District Report Card

PERCENTAGE OF HIGHLY QUALIFIED* TEACHERS

2004-05 97.8% 2010-11 100%

2005-06 100% 2011-12 100%

2006-07 99.6% 2012-13 99.7%

2007-08 98.4% 2013-14 100%

2008-09 99.2% 2014-15 100%**

2009-10 100% 2015-16 100%**

* The criteria for “Highly Qualified” is determined by state and federal policies and includes such things as education,

certification, experience, etc.

** Not including Abbott House instructors.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR 2015-16

See Saw- elementary Remind 101- general tech session Tech hints

3-D Printer MakerSpace

K-3 Technology in the classroom Class Dojo

Weebly Behavioral Understanding and Tactics

Math strategies for Elem Cathy’s Favorite Apps and Websites Gr. 1-3

Digital Library resources Rubrics for Problem Based or Project Based Learning

Google Drive (beginners) Google Classroom (beginners)

Google Classroom (advanced) See Saw- ChatterPix (secondary)

Elem. Apps Movies/ green screen

Science Lab Ideas (elem. And sec.) Coding

Social media for the classroom Digital Portfolios in Art

Music App (PE/ Classroom/ music??) Secondary apps for the classroom

Kahn Academy STAR testing- secondary

SPED apps (Dragon Dictation, etc.) ALEKS for elementary

PBL @ secondary level EDUCANNON

S.M.A.R.T. boost-Up Book Love Book Study

Socratic Seminar SLO- Creating a Classroom specific SLO

Learn Like A Pirate Twitter

New Teacher Learning Community High Order Thinking Skills

Notice of Intent to Provide Educational Environment Free from Harassment: The Mitchell School District 17-2 is committed to providing a learning and working environment free of harassment based on an individual's race, color, creed, religion, age, gender, disability, national origin or ancestry, mental and physical attributes, or any other status or condition protected by applicable federal or

state law.

It shall be a violation of this policy for any student, school personnel, or visitor to harass any individual through: (I) conduct or communication of a sexual

nature or, (ii) communication, disparaging a person's race, color, creed, religion, age, gender, disability, military status, ancestry or national origin, mental and

physical attributes, or any other status or condition protected by applicable federal or state law. For the purpose of this policy, "school personnel" includes school board members, all school employees and agents, volunteers, contractors, and persons subject to the supervision and control of the District.

This policy applies to violations that occur at the following locations: all District property; all District sponsored, approved or related activities at any location;

and when traveling to and from school and/or the workplace.

The District will investigate all complaints of harassment and appropriate action will be taken against the individual(s) who is found to have violated this

policy. Each building principal and program director has the responsibility for ensuring that all harassment complaints are investigated and that complainants receive a written response as to the outcome of their formal complaint.

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Page 25: Fall 2016 District Report Card

Mitchell School Boosters: 2015-16

_________________________________KIDS Grant Program:_________________________ The KIDS Grant Program was spearheaded by Mrs. Becker and launched for the first time in 2015-16. The program, through its donors, provided grant dollars to teachers for innovative classroom programs. KIDS Grant Donors 2015-16 KIDS Grant Recipients 2015-16 Innovated Systems- Roger Musick $5,000.00 Cathy VerSteeg $7,000.00 Bank West- Ryan Huber $1,000.00 Julie Olson $1,728.00 1st National Bank- Derek Fahey $1,000.00 Kris Borgan $ 100.00 Mitchell Telecom- Scott Peper $1,000.00 Morgan & Aslesen $ 500.00 Dr. Phil and Mrs. Sherri Becker $5,000.00 Sara Schultz $1,470.00 CorTrust $ 250.00 VanOverschelde & Solberg $ 400.00 Wede & Brenden & VerHey $1,000.00 Total $12,198.00

Mitchell High School: Volunteer/Donors: Donations: Athletic Boosters Concessions Stand Volunteers for All Events Avera Queen of Peace CPR Training, Class Prizes, Newspapers for Classrooms Rod Brown Assistance with Senior Awards Night Brown’s Shoe Fit Co. Science Class Supplies Jim Buechler Classroom Supplies Cortrust Bank Newspapers for Classrooms, Second Chance Support County Fair Blood Drive Refreshments Culver’s Athletic Program Sponsorships, Second Chance Support Daily Republic Classroom &Art Supplies, Newspapers for Classrooms, School Newspaper Assistance Dak. Discovery Museum Free Art Class Tours, Reception Site for National Art Honor Society Daylight Donuts Discounts on Student Council Event Refreshments Dependable Recycling Environmental Science Field Trips Domino’s Classroom Supplies, SRB Donations, Discounts for St. Council, FCCLA, Spoofed DWU Microscopes, Second Chance Support, Host for Sr. Awards Night, Science Fair Help Ellefson’s Implement Science Donations Ethan Lumber Architecture & Construction Class Donations Farmers Alliance Elev. Environmental Science Field Trips Brett & LeAnn Farnham Classroom Supplies Dr. Mike Farney Science Equipment and Science Fair Consulting Fire Department Homecoming ‘Burning of the M’, Field Trips Great Lakes Careers Class Presentations, Financial Aid Presentations JoLynn & Shay Hausmen Empty Bowl Event Assistance Iverson Chrysler Hosting Skills USA Automotive Contest Diane Kenkel, CNP Pro Bono Health Care and First Aid Supplies for all marching band and show choir activites KMIT Pro Bono Radio Announcements KORN Pro Bono Radio Announcements, Second Chance Support LifeQuest Joint Activities with Special Education Department Eric Maeschen Wrestling Program Volunteer, Careers Class Speaker, SADD Week Banner Donations Bruce Mastel Senior Awards Night DVD, Science Fair Posters Dr. Lucio Margallo Pro Bono Physician Coverage at Athletic Events McLeod’s Support for Activities Program Dr. Robert McWhirter Pro Bono Physician Coverage at Athletic Events/Athletic Training Program Mebius Nursery Use of Land for Projects Mitchell Clinic Summer Basketball Camp Shirt Donations MTI Training/Testing Site, Unfiltered Reality, Sponsor Lego League/Robotics, FFA Ag

Mechanics, Livestock Judging, Scrubs Camp, Science Donations, Second Chance MTI Construction Prog. Consultations on Construction Projects (Greg Neppl, Mark Munsen, Jim Mahoney) MTI Culinary Program Empty Bowl Event Assistance Music Boosters Extensive Financial and Volunteer Support National Guard Department Banner, Guest Speakers Nepstad’s Floral & Gifts St. Council Event Discounts, Décor for Sr Awards and Commencement Patzer Woodworking Architecture & Construction Class Donations Pepsi Bottling Co. Pepsi Products for School Events, Homecoming and Prom Photography Unlimited Pictures for Team Events, Prom, Athletic Banquet

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Page 26: Fall 2016 District Report Card

Pizza Ranch Gift Certificates/Discounts for Student Council Events

Police Department Chaperone at Student Council Events

Power Probe Automotive Test Equipment

ProBuild Lumber Architecture & Construction Class Donations

Puetz Construction Use of Indoor Tennis Facility

Tony Russell Science Fair Mentor

Sanford Research Biotech Supplies and Equipment

Dennis Schnabel Activity Photographs

Jed Schoenfelder Science Fair Mentor

SDSU/BEST Robotics Supplies

S&M Printing Empty Bowl Event Donation

Water Treatment Plant Environmental Science Field Trips

Art Supply Donors: Avera/Queen of Peace, Marge Bollack, Dental Designs, Brett & LeAnn Farnham, Leola Figland, Cathy

Frederickson, Graphic Packaging, Leila Guilbert, Interstate Glass, Cheryl Miller, Mueller Lumber,

FBLA Donors: Amber Dawn Photography, BPI, Burger King, Cabana Tan, Café Teresa’s, Ellefson’s Implement, Gary Engel,

First National Bank, Hollywood Style, Home Federal Bank, Innovative Systems, James River Gallery, Terry Reickman, Scott

Supply, SunGold Trophies, Twin City Fans

FFA Donors: A-OX Welding, BankWest, Big Green Supply, Campbell’s Supply, Central Electric, CorTrust Bank, Domino’s,

Ellefson’s Implement, Ethan Lumber, Farmers Alliance Elevator, First Dakota Bank, First National Bank, Fulton State Bank,

Lakeview Vet Clinic, MTI, Muth Electric, National Guard, Nepstad’s Floral & Gifts, NW Vet Supply, POET Ethanol Plant,

ProBuild Lumber, Puetz Construction, Scott Supply, Taylor & Miskimins, Trail King, TSC, Wells Fargo Bank

Second Chance Support: Deanell Backlund, Dav. City Health Nurse, Hardee’s, Home Federal Bank, Perkins, Quizno’s, Rew’s,

Rotary Club, Subway, Transmission Pro’s

Mitchell Middle School:

Volunteer/Donors: Donation:

Allen Remily Nurse Volunteer

Daily Republic Newspapers for Classrooms

Exchange Club Student of the Month Program

MaryLou Greenway Yoga Instruction

Lakeview Golf Golf for PE Classes

Mitchell Park & Rec Ice Arena, Ball Diamonds, Sportsman Club for PE Classes

Mitchell Hockey Association Usage of ice arena

Oleson, Pat PE/Health Speaker

Palace City Pedalers Bicycle Donation

Ron’s Bicycle Shop Maintenance of PH&W bikes

Ruby Pattison Volunteer Nurse Every Friday+

‘Sewing Angels’ Family and Consumer Science Program

Village Bowl Bowling Discounts for PE Classes

Trunk or Treat Donors: 4H Helping Hands, 4H Stand Up & Smile, $H Wider Horizons, A to Z Entertainment, American

Legion, Antlers, Arnies Gas Station, Avera Pediatrics, Bright Beginnings, Country Grooming/Kampwell Kennels, Craigs

Plumbing, Daily Republic, DWU Future Teachers, DWU Human Services, DWU Psychology Club, DWU Theater Club, Elks

Club, Firesteel, GBR Student Council, Girls Scouts, H&R Salvage, Hendrickson, Ideal Fashion and Furnishings, Interact Club

from Second Chance, Kernel Food Service, KMIT & KOOL 98, LBW Student Council, Lilly Puetz and Family, Mitchell FFA,

Mitchell Animal Rescue, Mitchell Aquatic Center, Mitchell Area Safehouse, Mitchell FCCLA, Mitchell Fire Department,

Mitchell Hockey and Skating Association, Mitchell Police Department, Mitchell skating Academy, MMS Student Council,

Modern Woodman, Northwestern Energy, Optimist Club, Overhead Door Company, Palace City Lions, SD Army National

Guard Unit, Shrine Club, SPOOFED, Sugar and Spice Daycare, Twin City Fan, Unfiltered REALity, United Blood Services,

Vern Eide Ford & GM, Women of the Moose, and Xtreme Cheer.

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Page 27: Fall 2016 District Report Card

Gertie Belle Rogers Elementary School: Volunteer/Donors: Donation:

Anonymous $100/Month for Student Assistance

Chamber of Commerce Ag in the Classroom

Coborn’s Cash for Receipts, Field Trips

Culver’s Attendance Awards

Daily Republic Newspapers for Classrooms

Dairy Queen Student Awards

Davison County Child Protection Team Book Donations

GBR PTO Carnival, Bingo Night, Talent Show, Playground Equipment, Classroom Supplies,

Family Nights, 1st Grade Fingerprinting, Teacher Recognitions, Scholarship,

Technology Purchases, Yearbook, GBR Scholarship.

JA Junior Achievement Program

Mitchell Park & Rec Arbor Day Trees

Mitchell Technical Institute Work study Students

Optimist Club Mittens and Hats for Students

Pizza Hut Book It! Program

Sr. Citizen Volunteers Large Mailing Assistance, Receipt Mailing

Subway ‘Proud Principal’ Student Awards

Dr. Nathan Timmer Daily Republic Newspapers for students

Vern Eide Carnival Prizes and Backpacks

VFW Apples for Teacher Appreciation Week

L. B. Williams Elementary School: Volunteeer/Donors: Donation:

Anonymous $100/Month for Student Assistance

American Legion Axillary Apples for teacher appreciation week

Avera Queen of Peace Classroom Volunteers

Bank West Apples and Cookies for teacher appreciation week

Chamber of Commerce Ag in the Classroom Program, Gift Donations

Coborn’s Cash for Receipts Program

Culver’s Restaurant Attendance Awards, Circus Tickets, Children’s Miracle Network Donation

Daily Republic Newspapers for Classrooms

Dairy Queen Student Awards

Davison Co. Implement Bikes/Prizes for Carnival

Goodwill Hats/mittens for Children

Innovative Systems Bikes/Prizes for Carnival

Interstate Battery Makerspace Batteries

JA Junior Achievement Program

Kiwanis Club Books for 4th Grade

KORN Rolls for Teacher Appreciation Week

LBW Student Council Little Stars Mentoring, PT Conference Greeters, Salvation Army Bell Ringing

Lion’s Club Vision Screenings

Mitchell Area Charitable Found. $2,000 Grant

Mitchell Park & Rec Arbor Day Trees

Optimist Club Caps and Mittens for Students

LBW PTO School Carnival, Fine Arts Night, Yearbook, Burger King Nights, Printer

Cartridges, 1st Grade Fingerprinting, Teacher Recognitions, Scholarship, iPads,

Field Trip Support, 5th Grade Recognition, Staff Taco bar

Rodeo Club Winters Coats and Mittens for Students

Scott Supply Carnival Prizes

Subway Student of the Month Awards

Vern Eide Cupcakes, Christmas Gifts

VFW Apples for Teacher Appreciation Week

School Supply Donors: BankWest, KORN, Sylvia Lee, New Home Lutheran Church, Avera Queen of Peace, Park & Rec,

Mitchell Firefighters

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Page 28: Fall 2016 District Report Card

Longfellow Elementary School: Volunteeer/Donors: Donation:

Anonymous $100/Month for Student Assistance

Arby’s Carnival Donations

Chamber of Commerce Ag in the Classroom, Gift Donations, Kindergarten Round-up Items

Corona Village Carnival Donations

County Fair Saver Stamps Program

Culver’s Carnival Donations, Culver’s Night, Attendance Awards

Daily Republic Newspapers for Classrooms

Dairy Queen Carnival Donations, Summer Reading Program, DQ Night

The Depot Carnival Donations

FBLA Student Volunteers for the Carnival

Hardees Carnival Donations

Junior Achievement JA Program

Lion’s Club Vision Screening

Logan Luxury 5 Carnival Donations

Longfellow PTO Carnival, Bingo Night, Field Trips, Guided Reading Books, Yearbooks, 5th

Grade Recognition Refreshments, Teacher Appreciation Luncheon, Scholarship

Marlin’s Restaurant Carnival Donations

McDonald’s Carnival Donations

Mitchell Park & Rec Arbor Day Trees

Papa Murphy’s Papa Murphy Nights, Carnival Donations

Perkins Carnival Donations

Pizza Hut Book-It! Program

Pizza Ranch Carnival Donations

Rodeo Club/Campbell Supply Coats & boots for students

Second Chance High Sponsor Science Day, Carnival volunteers

Subway Attendance Awards/ Carnival Donations

VFW Apples for Teacher Appreciation Week

School Supply Donors: Local Fire Chapter, Avera Queen of Peace, Mitchell Activities & Recreation Center,

Presbyterian Church

MITCHELL COMMUNITY SCHOLARSHIP FUND

2002-2016

The purpose of the Mitchell Community Scholarship Fund is to affirm our belief in the youth of our community

by expanding access to higher education for graduates of Mitchell School District 17-2 and Mitchell Christian School

by developing an operating structure, raising funds for student scholarship distribution, and distributing awards on a

fair and nondiscriminatory basis. The Fund’s goal is to provide a scholarship to every one of our graduates who go on

for post-secondary study. For the last 13 years, it has met that goal.

2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07

No. of Scholarships Awarded 115 144 149 158 143

Scholarship Value $175.00-$225.00 $200.00-$250.00 $200.00-$250.00 $300.00-$400.00 $350.00-$400.00

Total Amount of Scholarships $22,775.00 $32,175.00 $33,425.00 $53,000.00 $52,450.00

Endowment Fund $92,567.35 $93,067.35 $95,962.45 $104,052.45 $138,484.08

2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12

No. of Scholarships Awarded 168 149 144 157 159

Scholarship Value $350.00-$400.00 $400.00 $450.00 $450.00-$500.00 $500.00-$550.00

Total Amount of Scholarships $61,500.00 $59,600.00 $64,800.00 $75,900.00 $82,250.00

Endowment Fund $155,197.35 $184,037.46 $221,042.09 $252,263.00 $249,881.00

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

No. of Scholarships Awarded 175 165 158 153

Scholarship Value $500.00-$550.00 $500-$550 $550-600 $600-650

Total Amount of Scholarships $89,900.00 $85,000 $89,100 $93,800

Endowment Fund $319,092.00 $384,831 $417,677 $429,188

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Page 29: Fall 2016 District Report Card

SCHOOL DISCIPLINE

2015-16 DATA

SERVICES/ACTIVITIES DESIGNED TO ENHANCE

SCHOOL SAFETY AND CLIMATE

* After school/before school programs * Peer Helpers

* Alternative education programs * Security cameras and key fob systems

* Community service projects * Security personnel (School Resource Officer)

* Conflict resolution/peer mediation * Special one-time events: Red Ribbon Week, Character

* Curriculum acquisition or development Counts, etc.

* Drug prevention instruction * Student support services

* Olweus Anti-Bullying Program * Teacher/staff training

* Parent education involvement * Violence/prevention instruction

* Prevention Specialist, Samantha Olson, on Staff * Peer Tutoring

*Tobacco Prevention Group-“Unfiltered Reality” * SPOOFED

NUMBER OF DRUG, ALCOHOL, AND VIOLENT OFFENSES AT SCHOOL

OFFENSES

MITCHELL

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

MITCHELL

MIDDLE

SCHOOL

MITCHELL

SENIOR HIGH

SCHOOL

Number of students 1397 585 778

Alcohol 0 0 1

Arson 2 0 0

Battery (Aggravated Assault) 0 0 0

Breaking and entering/burglary 0 0 0

Disorderly conduct 4 3 1

Drugs, other than alcohol 0 0 5

Fighting 0 2 3

Larceny/Theft 0 0 1

Robbery 0 0 0

Sexual harassment 0 1 0

Other Sex Offenses 0 0 1

Threat/Intimidation 3 2 0

Tobacco 0 4 0

Trespassing 0 0 0

Vandalism 2 0 0

Weapon (rifle/shotgun) 0 0 0

Weapon (other than firearm)* 0 1 0

Other criminal offenses (non-violent) 0 0 0

Number of expulsions 0 0 0

Number of in-school suspensions 2 6 0

Number of out-of-school suspensions 6 6 15

*Example: student brings pocket knife to school without intent to harm.

TOTAL FIREARM EXPULSIONS

OFFENSES

MITCHELL

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

MITCHELL

MIDDLE

SCHOOL

MITCHELL

SENIOR HIGH

SCHOOL

Number of students 1397 585 778

Expulsions for violations of the

firearms policy reported under

criminal or violent offenses

0

0

0

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Page 30: Fall 2016 District Report Card

AUXILIARY SERVICES OF OUR SCHOOL DISTRICT

BUILDINGS 2015-2016

GERTIE BELLE

ROGERS

ELEMENTARY

SCHOOL

LONGFELLOW

ELEMENTARY

SCHOOL

L.B. WILLIAMS

ELEMENTARY

SCHOOL

MITCHELL

MIDDLE

SCHOOL

MITCHELL

SENIOR HIGH

SCHOOL

Year Built 1994 2010 1993 1969 1961

Recent

Improvements

HVAC Upgrade,

Office Cubby

Renovations,

Additional Playground

Pea Gravel

Lunchroom

Serving Area

Renovation,

Addition of

Longfellow Lion,

Upgrade of

Playground

Tunnel

Landscaping

Hallway Painting,

Exterior Bench

Replacements,

Additional

Playground Pea

Gravel

West Entrance

Sidewalk

Replacement,

Cooling Tower

Upgrades

North End Parking Lot

Replacement, Boiler

Tube Replacements,

Wood Fence

Installation around

Cooling Tower,

Performing Arts

Center Construction,

MCTEA Front

Entrance Concrete

Replacement,

MCTEA Upgrade

from Hot Water Boiler

to Hot Water Heater

Annual Building

Costs $67,826 $68,866 $74,329 $119,445 $124,362

Building Square

Footage 53,738 62,535 75,000 136,520 165,278

Number of

Students

427

395

539

585

778

Building Opera-

tional Cost Per

Square Foot

$1.26

$1.10

$0.99

$0.87

$0.75

Building Opera-

tional Cost Per

Student

$158.84

$174.34

$137.90

$204.18

$159.85

Square Footage

Per Student 126 158 139 233 212

Student/

Computer Ratio 1.2:1 1:1 1.2:1 1:1 1:1

Qualifiers and Conclusions:

1. Annual building costs include electricity, gas, water, and sewer.

2. Changes to annual building costs varied by building with increased costs at Longfellow and LBW and decreased costs at MMS

and MHS.

3. Student/Computer ratios continue to fall. We expect to reach a true 1:1 environment in all buildings by the fall of 2017.

TRANSPORTATION

2015-16 Number of Routes: 7 rural, 1 city

Regular Route Buses Available: 11

Average Bus Age: 11 years

Average Bus Mileage: 132,864 miles

Total Cost of Regular Route Busing: $241,249

Cost Per Mile for Bus Operation: $2.81

Number of Rural Children Transported Daily: 140

Number of Rural Bus Route Miles Each Day: 490

Average Rural Miles Drive Daily/ Bus: 70 Total Rural Bus Rate Miles Traveled Per Year: 85,750

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Page 31: Fall 2016 District Report Card

FOOD SERVICE

2015-16

Number of Breakfasts Served: 58,821

Number of Lunches Served: 280,873

Costs of Meals at Mitchell School District:

Breakfast

$2.00 = Middle School/Senior High

$1.85 = Elementary

Lunch

$3.00 = Middle School/Senior High

$2.80 = Elementary

Average Daily Participation in Food Service Program:

Breakfast School Lunch

26% Longfellow Elementary School 72%

16% Gertie Belle Rogers Elementary School 72%

17% L.B. Williams Elementary School 73%

12% Mitchell Middle School 80%

4% Mitchell Senior High School 45%

Fund Balance of the Hot Lunch Program:

2011-12 = $243,358

2012-13 = $239,992

2013-14 = $192.825

2014-15 = $135,534

2015-16 = $169,157

Conclusions: Breakfast and lunch prices are about the same as or just slightly higher than the average prices of the

other ESD school districts. Meal process will remain unchanged for 2016-17. Due to changes in meal offerings as a

result of new federal regulations, participation rates in the school meals programs fell in all buildings in 2014-15, by 5-9

percentage points, but rose overall in 2015-16 with the addition of many new meal offerings. The presence of an

open lunch period for sophomores, juniors, and seniors, at the high school means a consistently lower participation

rate there. The fund balance for the school lunch program rose in 2015-2016 due to increased participation rates

and cost-cutting measures.

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Page 32: Fall 2016 District Report Card

EXTRACURRICULAR PROGRAMMING OF

OUR SCHOOL DISTRICT

2015-16 ACTIVITIES

ACTIVITIES

GRADE

LEVEL

OFFERED

BOYS

AND/

OR

GIRLS

NUMBER

OF

FEMALES

NUMBER

OF

MALES

GIRLS

PARTICIPATION

RATE

2015-16

BOYS

PARTICIPATION

RATE

2015-16

Student

Council 3-5 Both 75 68 22% 20%

Geography Bee 4-5 Both 45 42 50% 47%

Geography Bee 6-8 Both 247 249 84% 85%

Band 5 Both 32 26 28% 22%

Vocal Concerts K-5 Both 676 685 100% 100%

Elementary

Show Choir 5 Both 35 46 87% 92%

Festival Choir 4-5 Both 19 9 21% 10%

Spelling Bee 3-5 Both 312 291 92% 86%

Cross Country 7-12 Both 19 19 3% 3%

STAR Ambassadors 4-5 Both 12 11 13% 12%

Golf 7-12 Both 24 23 4% 4%

Gymnastics 7-12 Girls 11 NA 2% NA

Tennis 7-12 Both 21 37 4% 6%

Cheerleading 9-12 Girls 13 NA 3% NA

Competitive Cheer 9-12 Girls 21 NA 5% NA

Competitive Dance 9-12 Girls 21 NA 5% NA

Debate 9-12 Both 25 13 6% 3%

Show Choir/ ShowPit 9-12 Both 48 28 12% 7%

Declam 9-12 Both 5 2 1% 1%

Newspaper 9-12 Both 11 2 3% 1%

Student Council 9-12 Both 31 7 8% 2%

MS Student Council

6-8 Both 33 8 11% 3%

FCCLA 9-12 Both 8 0 2% 0%

MS FCCLA 7-8 Both 4 0 2% 0%

Yearbook 9-12 Both 6 3 2% 1%

MS Yearbook 8 Both 16 0 16% 0%

Football

Grade 12

Grade 11

Grade 10

Grade 9

Grade 8

Grade 7

Boys

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

7

22

11

36

39

24

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

7%

23%

11%

37%

40%

24%

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Page 33: Fall 2016 District Report Card

ACTIVITIES

GRADE

LEVEL

OFFERED

BOYS

AND/

OR

GIRLS

NUMBER

OF

FEMALES

NUMBER

OF

MALES

GIRLS

PARTICIPATION

RATE

2015-16

BOYS

PARTICIPATION

RATE

2015-16

Girls Basketball

Grade 12

Grade 11

Grade 10

Grade 9

Grade 8

Grade 7

Girls

3

5

4

14

12

6

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

3%

5%

4%

14%

12%

16%

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Boys Basketball

Grade 12

Grade 11

Grade 10

Grade 9

Grade 8

Grade 7

Boys

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

4

9

16

15

20

25

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

4%

9%

16%

15%

20%

26%

Volleyball

High

School

Grade 8

Grade 7

Girls

29

24

34

N/A

N/A

N/A

7%

24%

35%

N/A

N/A

N/A

Wrestling

High

School

Grades 7-8

Boys

N/A

25

24

N/A

6%

12%

Track

High

School

Grades 7-8

Both 28

31

45

43

7%

16%

12%

22%

One Act Play 9-12 Both 15 13 4% 3%

Spring Play 9-12 Both 15 10 4% 3%

Fall Musical 9-12 Both 31 15 8% 4%

Marching Band 9-12 Both 55 29 14% 7%

Jazz Band 9-12 Both 11 8 3% 2%

Drum Line Band 8-12 Both 3 5 1% 1%

Pep Band 9-12 Both 5 10 1% 2%

MS Musical 6-8 Both 30 9 10% 3%

MS Band 6-8 Both 85 61 29% 21%

Middle School Show

Choir 6-8 Both 68 24 23% 8%

Middle School

Vocal Music 6-8 Both 134 46 46% 16%

Middle School Jazz

Band 6-8 Both 9 8 3% 3%

SPOOFED 9-12 Both 7 8 2% 2%

MS Unfiltered Reality 6-8 Both 73 51 25% 17%

MHS Unfiltered

Reality 9-12 Both 12 2 3% 1%

Soccer 7-12 Both 37 38 6% 7%

HS Vocal 9-12 Both 95 45 24% 12%

FFA 9-12 Both 24 11 6% 3%

FBLA 9-12 Both 36 8 9% 2%

Notice of Equal Opportunity in Employment & Education Programs and Services The Mitchell School District is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate against employees or job applicants on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, age, gender, disability, military status, national origin or ancestry, or any other status or condition protected by applicable federal or state statutes. Inquiries concerning Title VI and Title IX may be referred to the Business Manager, Mitchell School District 17-2, 821 N. Capital Street, Mitchell SD 57301. Inquires can also be directed to the Regional Office of Civil Rights at the following: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, One Petticoat Lane, 1010 Walnut Street, 3rd Floor, Suite 320, Kansas City, MO 64106; Tel: 816-268-0550.

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Page 34: Fall 2016 District Report Card

FINANCES OF OUR SCHOOL DISTRICT

SOURCES OF REVENUE There are four sources for revenues for the general operating fund:

Local County State Federal

Property Taxes Fines State Aid Title I – Reading and Math

Interest Public Land Monies Title II – Class size Reduction

Ticket Sales and Facility Rentals Grants

RECEIPTS

General Operating Fund: Comparisons of Receipts

YEAR LOCAL COUNTY STATE FEDERAL TOTAL 2010-11 $5,899,903 $273,672 $6.250.307 $2,160,917 $14,584,799

2011-12 $6,365,551 $285,875 $6,635,811 $1,214,988 $14,502,225

2012-13 $6,770,286 $248,569 $6,602,280 $1,127,585 $14,748,720

2013-14 $7,322,205 $237,814 $7,236,087 $1,066,115 $15,862,221

2014-15 $7,977,035 $281,725 $7,283,770 $1,034,178 $16,576,708

2015-16 $8,035,131 $280,775 $7,744,804 $1,030,031 $17,090,741

OPT-OUT FUNDS YEAR AMOUNT AVAILABLE AMOUNT LEVIED

2003 $700,000 $600,000*

2004 $700,000 $550,000

2005 $700,000 $350,000

2006 $700,000 $250,000

2007 $700,000 $150,000

2008, 2009, 2010 $700,000 0**

2011 $700,000 $200,000***

2012, 2013 $700,000 $400,000***

2014 $700,000 $200,000

2015, 2016, 2017 $700,000 0**

* Because the full amount of an opt out must be used in the first year, the Board of Education collected the

$700,000.00 in year 2002-03 but reduced its general levy that year by $100,000.00 to reflect the actual need of $600,000.00.

**Because the District promised, in the opt-out election in 2002, that it would levy opt-out dollars only to maintain current

programming, the School Board levied no opt-out dollars for 2008, 2009, 2010, 2015 and 2016 since no cuts were necessary

without those dollars.

***With the state Funding frozen for 2010-11 and subsequently cut in 2011-12 it became necessary to begin using a portion of the

available opt-out dollars to prevent educational program cuts. The Board began reducing the levied opt-out amount for the

2014 year, zeroing it out again for 2015-2016.

47%

45%

2%

6%

LOCAL

STATE

COUNTY

FEDERAL

34

Page 35: Fall 2016 District Report Card

EXPENDITURES

YEAR

SALARIES

AND

BENEFITS

PURCHASED

SERVICES

SUPPLIES

OTHER

TOTAL

2010-11 $12,761,489 $1,224,210 $594,536 $110,515 $14,690,750

2011-12 $11,966,020 $1,284,189 $702,137 $161.745 $14,114,091

2012-13 $12,087,958 $1,617,678 $665,380 $166,775 $14,532,791

2013-14 $12,686,074 $2,092,951 $728,129 $181,669 $15,688,823

2014-15 $13,497,998 $1,900,808 $718,647 $171,029 $16,288,482

2015-16 $14,111,874 $2,430,030 $656,383 $220,655 $17,418,942

PER PUPIL COSTS

GENERAL FUND

YEAR

DISTRICT PER PUPIL COST

STATE FINANCE FORMULA

RATE PER PUPIL

2010-11 $5,917.81 $4,804.60

2011-12 $5,556.72 $4,390.00

2012-13 $5,597.82 $4,490.92

2013-14 $5,780.71 $4,625.65

2014-15 $5,930.51 $4,781.14

2015-16 $6,254.56 $4,876.76

CAPITAL OUTLAY SPECIFIC EXPENDITURES

EXPENDITURE AMOUNT

L.B. Williams Lease $342,830

Debt Payment* $2,503,982

Equipment Purchases $827,177

Building/Site Improvements $279,397

Textbooks/Transportation $195,139

Total $4,148,525

*These are the payments for the capital outlay certificates that were issued for the construction of Longfellow Elementary

School in 2009, the new stadium on Joe Quintal Field in 2010, and the Performing Arts Center in 2015, along with QZAB Funds for

maintenance projects throughout the last 15 years.

81%

14%

4%

1%

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%

SALARIES AND

BENEFITS

PURCHASED

SERVICES

SUPPLIES

OTHER

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Page 36: Fall 2016 District Report Card

ENDING BALANCES FOR DIFFERENT ACCOUNTS

YEAR GENERAL CAPITAL OUTLAY SPECIAL EDUCATION FOOD SERVICE 2004-05 $2,740,875 $447,029 $ 461,090 $111,321

2005-06 $2,853,542 $712,923 $ 596,340 $160,558

2006-07 $3,133,221 $972,780 $ 730,269 $229,944

2007-08 $3,298,057 $944,350 $1,175,398 $295,980

2008-09 $3,723,044 $436,765 $1,184,432 $299,324

2009-10 $3,729,538 $325,567 $ 805,168 $301,064

2010-11 $3,623,588 $760,782 $1,039,357 $258,104

2011-12 $4,073,629 $628,341 $772,566 $243,358

2012-13 $4,289,557 $252,023 $830,989 $233,992

2013-14 $4,464,165 $1,006,254 $796,935 $192,824

2014-15 $4,759,309 $611,207 $716,483 $135,534

2015-16 $4,431,290 $763,321 $464,296 $169,157

GENERAL FUND ENDING BALANCE

SOLVENCY RATIO

The district’s solvency ratio is determined by dividing the ending general fund balance by the total expenditures.

YEAR SOLVENCY RATIO

2006-07 22.9%

2007-08 23.2%

2008-09 25.6%

2009-10 25.3%

2010-11 24.7%

2011-12 28.9%

2012-13 29.5%

2013-14 28.5%

2014-15 29.2%

2015-16 25.4%

ASBESTOS STATEMENT In accordance with EPA regulations, Mitchell School District’s buildings have been inspected for friable materials that

contain asbestos. Friable asbestos containing material is not present in Mitchell School District’s buildings. Records of inspections

and locations of asbestos containing materials and a copy of relevant EPA regulations are available. All asbestos except for that in

the floor tile at Mitchell Senior High School and Mitchell Middle School has been removed from district buildings.

This report card was prepared by Bobbie Schelske, with information received from the Superintendent of Schools, building

principals and secretaries, Business Manager, Director of Buildings and Grounds, Activities Director, Director of Food Service, and

Director of Special Services.

0

1,000,000

2,000,000

3,000,000

4,000,000

5,000,000

2004-

05

2005-

06

2006-

07

2007-

08

2008-

09

2009-

10

2010-

11

2011-

12

2012-

13

2013-

14

2014-

15

2015-

16

36