february 2008 newsletter (1.28 mb)

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Volume 6, Issue 1 February 2008 The Little River Watermark Membership Newsletter for Friends of DuPont Forest President’s Corner Gloria Clouse, FODF President Hiking in DuPont State Forest is always a pleasure. Following the 5” January snowfall in Transylvania/Henderson coun- ties, I took a hike with friends to the rock quarry. Even though I had been on the trail before, the white blanket of snow over the rocks, the bright sunlight sparkling off the trees, and the crunchy sound of my boots making prints on the trail, made the hike a totally new experience. The Friends of DuPont Forest Events committee recognizes the changing face of DuPont Forest and we have included a hike for each season in our Events Calendar for 2008. You will find a schedule that includes popular events from last year as well as the seasonal hikes listed in this newsletter. The Winter Hike will be to Wintergreen Falls on February 23, 2008 led by Fred Roane, FODF board member and naturalist. The schedule also lists other important dates including litter pickup and member get-togethers. We hope you will be able to join us for some of these events. The Annual FODF Board retreat was held on January 12, 2008. We gained a broader view of DuPont State Forest as we listened to speakers and made plans for the new year. Ed Swartzman is completing a two year survey of the flora and fauna of Transylvania County. He gave us a comprehensive overview of the Natural Heritage areas in DuPont State For- est. A local archeologist, Lorie Hanson, is surveying rock art in North Carolina and made a presentation to the board. We also heard about the promising work of the American Chest- nut Society and their efforts to reestablish these mighty trees back into the forests. In the afternoon, we had a work session facilitated by Renee Kumer. The day was educational and productive. We hope that you frequently check our website, www.dupontforest.com , this newsletter and past newsletters which are posted in the FODF section, to keep you up to date. We will also have trail closings and (hopefully) openings posted on the website. The Burnt Mountain Trail is currently closed. Any updates on the progress toward opening the sec- tion of Conservation Road by the Lake Julia Dam will also be posted on the website. Our Annual Meeting is scheduled for April 14, 2008 at the Transylvania County Library. There will be refreshments and informal displays at 6:30pm followed by a general meeting at 7:00pm. We will recognize volunteers and report on projects and DuPont State Forest issues. Gloria Clouse, Gloria Clouse, Gloria Clouse, Gloria Clouse, Friends of DuPont Forest President Friends of DuPont Forest President Friends of DuPont Forest President Friends of DuPont Forest President The FODF Board and the membership extend our sympathies to David Brown, DuPont State Forest Supervisor, on the death of his wife, Claire on January 10, 2008. Claire was a good friend and was very supportive of FODF projects. She volunteered as a Parking Lot host, helped with Tour de Falls, and hiked and ran in the forest daily. We will miss her Revisiting the Past 2 Tales of the Forest & Hunting Dogs 3 Wildlife Thieves 4 Hiker Safety 5 Upcoming Events 6 Volunteers Needed 7 Membership Form 10 Inside this issue: New Pier Built & Winter Hike Planned 8 Litter Haters Alert 9

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Page 1: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

Volume 6, Issue 1 February 2008

The Little River

Watermark

Membership Newsletter for Friends of DuPont Forest

President’s Corner Gloria Clouse, FODF President

Hiking in DuPont State Forest is always a pleasure. Following the 5” January snowfall in Transylvania/Henderson coun-ties, I took a hike with friends to the rock quarry. Even though I had been on the trail before, the white blanket of snow over the rocks, the bright sunlight sparkling off the trees, and the crunchy sound of my boots making prints on the trail, made the hike a totally new experience. The Friends of DuPont Forest Events committee recognizes the changing face of DuPont Forest and we have included a hike for each season in our Events Calendar for 2008. You will find a schedule that includes popular events from last year as well as the seasonal hikes listed in this newsletter. The Winter Hike will be to Wintergreen Falls on February 23, 2008 led by Fred Roane, FODF board member and naturalist. The schedule also lists other important dates including litter pickup and member get-togethers. We hope you will be able to join us for some of these events.

The Annual FODF Board retreat was held on January 12, 2008. We gained a broader view of DuPont State Forest as we listened to speakers and made plans for the new year. Ed Swartzman is completing a two year survey of the flora and fauna of Transylvania County. He gave us a comprehensive overview of the Natural Heritage areas in DuPont State For-est. A local archeologist, Lorie Hanson, is surveying rock art in North Carolina and made a presentation to the board. We also heard about the promising work of the American Chest-nut Society and their efforts to reestablish these mighty trees back into the forests. In the afternoon, we had a work session facilitated by Renee Kumer. The day was educational and productive.

We hope that you frequently check our website, www.dupontforest.com, this newsletter and past newsletters which are posted in the FODF section, to keep you up to date. We will also have trail closings and (hopefully) openings posted on the website. The Burnt Mountain Trail is currently closed. Any updates on the progress toward opening the sec-tion of Conservation Road by the Lake Julia Dam will also be posted on the website.

Our Annual Meeting is scheduled for April 14, 2008 at the Transylvania County Library. There will be refreshments and informal displays at 6:30pm followed by a general meeting at 7:00pm. We will recognize volunteers and report on projects and DuPont State Forest issues.

Gloria Clouse, Gloria Clouse, Gloria Clouse, Gloria Clouse, Friends of DuPont Forest PresidentFriends of DuPont Forest PresidentFriends of DuPont Forest PresidentFriends of DuPont Forest President

The FODF Board and the membership extend our sympathies to David Brown, DuPont State Forest Supervisor, on the death of his wife, Claire on January 10, 2008. Claire was a good friend and was very supportive of FODF projects. She volunteered as a Parking Lot host, helped with Tour de Falls,

and hiked and ran in the forest daily.

We will miss her

Revisiting the Past 2

Tales of the Forest & Hunting Dogs

3

Wildlife Thieves 4

Hiker Safety 5

Upcoming Events 6

Volunteers Needed 7

Membership Form 10

Inside this issue:

New Pier Built & Winter Hike Planned

8

Litter Haters Alert 9

Page 2: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

Keep up to date with more events sponsored by the Friends of DuPont Forest by going to

www.dupontforest.com.

“This is my great-great-grandfather…” These are the words heard by the FODF members that took the Cemetery Hike with John Car-ney in early December. The words were spoken by Marty McCall Lemke who is the great-great-granddaughter of James Lewis Sen-telle, the Union soldier buried at the Hooker-Moore Cemetery. Marty related the story of the soldier, a mini-“Cold Mountain” saga. James Sentelle, his cousin and a friend were killed by Confederate soldiers or local militia while he was enroute from Tennessee to his home in Little River. They were planning to move James’ expec-tant wife and the whole family through the lines to work in Ken-tucky. The three were captured and summarily executed at a spring near the Pisgah Methodist Church near South Hominy in Buncombe County. Local residents later placed the bodies in shal-low graves. When the family learned of the tragedy, two men went to the site with a wagon to recover the bodies and bring them home. The bodies were kept cool by wet moss and leaves during the trip. The cousin was buried in the Sentelle Family Cemetery in Little River while James was subsequently bur-ied in (near) the present cemetery. Although his gravestone is now located in the center of the cemetery today, the ex-act grave location is not known. The family story is that he was buried just outside the cemetery boundary. The grave-stone was apparently moved many years ago.

The hikers learned that the cemetery was used by the Laurel Creek Baptist Church which is no longer in existence. The actual church site is now in Cascade Lake. No records have been found for the church. According to earlier research by Alton Taylor, the current pastor of the Rocky Hill Baptist Church, and his late wife, Billie, there are at least 65 or more graves in the cemetery though only a few have legible tomb-stones. There are some newer markers for members of the Isaac Heath family. According to the family legend, Isaac Heath buried four of his children by himself during an epidemic as he did not want to expose others. He is believed to be buried with the children per his own request. His wife is buried in the nearby Rocky Hill Baptist Church cemetery. Al-ton Taylor and other residents of the Cedar Mountain area are descen-dants of Isaac Heath.

Cemetery Hike Pictures courtesy of John Carney

Revisiting the Past John Carney, FODF Board Member

Marty McCall Lemke

Pictures from the November 17th Fall Hike. Twenty one people attended. We hiked the trails around the Rock Quarry. Fall Hike pictures courtesy of Bev Parlier

Page 3: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

Tales of the Forest by John Carney, Chairman of DSF History Project & FODF Board

What Once Was….. The area behind the Guion Farms where the radio antenna is now located was once a very busy farm area. In addition to the remaining large farmhouse building, there was a large barn, a corn crib, a Quonset shed and pit silos. Some of the foundation elements are still visible when walking slowly over the area. The current parking area and much of the nearby woods were rolling farmlands when DuPont acquired the property in 1956. The pagoda structure was built by DuPont and used as a bandstand for company events. A small concrete pad near the large roofed shelter was the cook-ing area. Another Lake In The Forest? According to local stories there was a water-powered sawmill at the base of Bridal Veil Falls many years ago. There was also a small lake, probably a couple of acres in size, located on the bottom right side of the Falls as you face them. The remnants of an old dam can be seen on the far side of the river. Days Gone By Lake Dense and Lake Alfred were created by DuPont to provide idyllic fishing opportunities for prospective customers visiting the plant. While each of these lakes is fed by stream water, the summertime water temperature and oxygen lev-els were not deemed suitable to be a year-round trout habitat. A pipeline was built from Lake Julia to provide supple-mental cooler water when needed. The lakes were stocked, as were some of the streams, to ensure a good catch.

FODF Opposes Unleashed Hunting Dogs By Jeff Jennings, FODF Board Member

The NC Wildlife Commission is considering the following major policy change: "H35: Allow dogs to be used during permit hunts for small game, bear, opossum and raccoon on the DuPont State Forest Game Land." Public comment is being solicited until February 1st. Friends of DuPont Forest respects the rights of hunters to use DuPont State Forest, most of which is designated NC Gamelands. However, our organization strongly disagrees with the proposed policy change which would allow for unleashed dogs to run the property during both the day and night. Such a stark change of policy is inconsistent with the existing recreational use of the forest and the present rules requiring other forest users to keep their dogs on a leash. We encourage our membership to study the proposed regulations and make their voice heard before the deadline for public comment on February 1st. Please go to this link below to make your voice heard on this important issue or you can go to www.dupontforest.com and click on the link found on the first page.

http://ncpaws.org/regulationswebform

Find and click on "H35". Enter you name, address, and email address in order to submit your comment. There are many reasons why the unleashed dog hunting is not compatible with current Forest usage: 1. Packs of roaming dogs could startle horses or frighten other trail users 2. Other dog owners are required to keep their dogs on a leash 3. Bear hunting with dogs is associated with high speed traffic and gunfire on

and near roadways * 4. Unleashed dogs frequently roam on neighboring property, requiring trespass-

ing in order to retrieve them * * see Chattooga Conservancy web page at http://www.chattoogariver.org for ad-ditional information regarding this issue.

Page 4: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

It was June 1938 when Leopold, incensed at the theft of a rare native plant from the Arboretum, sent this letter to the Wisconsin State Journal. Despite five decades of public education, last spring another vandal dug a white ladyslipper from Green Prai-rie. There are still people who are contemptuous of the law and of protected public property, who profess to love nature but cannot be troubled to learn its processes and mysteries.

Letter to A(nother) Wildflower Digger by Aldo Leopold

This letter is addressed, through the columns of the State Journal, to that unknown person who last week dug up the only remaining yellow ladyslipper in the Wingra woods. While your name is unknown, your action sufficiently portrays the low esteem of ei-ther your character or your education. On the chance that the latter rather than the former is at fault, I address to you this letter. I address it also to all whose gardens at this season suddenly blossom forth with new wildflowers lifted from other people’s woods. When John Muir came to the Madison region two generations ago, the woods and marshes were studded with millions of ladyslippers of a score of species. Today, what with drainage, fire, cow, plow, and wildflower diggers—like yourself—a dozen of these species are extinct, and the remainder are so rare that the average citizen has never seen one. Now John Muir got something pleasant and valuable from his wildflowers. He became a great man, and it seems likely that the wildflowers had some-thing to do with it. It is reasonable to suppose that the present generation might get something pleasant and valuable from them too—if there were any. But no one, even yourself, is going to get anything valuable from this ladyslipper languishing in your backyard. The University of Wisconsin, has got the notion, perhaps a foolish one, that the privilege of seeing a ladyslipper in the woods has got something to do with education. For this reason it is acquiring an arboretum. It wants to take its botany students out there and show them what the Wisconsin looked like in its youth—in John Muir’s youth. It hopes that this will make them dissatisfied with what Wisconsin looks like now. But now, thanks to you, the Wingra woods is one step nearer looking like all the rest of the state. Perhaps, after all, our students would learn a lot if we took them out there and said: “Here is where we used to have a ladyslipper.” Then, if you will consent to the invasion of your privacy, we would like to take them to your backyard and show them where you have planted it, and how it is thriving in its new home. In respect of thriving, here are some things you may not know. Only one man has ever succeeded in germinating the seeds of this species in artificial surroundings. It takes a high powered chemist to reproduce the conditions necessary for its germination. Wild woods sometimes allow of reproduction, but backyards never. After the seedling has been born, it takes four years to reach the age of flowering. Do you think your ladyslipper will reproduce its kind in your backyard? One of our ambitions for the arboretum is to apply the newly discovered chemistry for germinating the species, i.e. to start a “ladyslipper nursery” out of which the Wingra woods, and all other Wisconsin woods not yet graved to death, may be abundantly restocked. To this end we have hired the only living man who knows how to do it, and he is ready to make the attempt. But now you have taken his source of seed. We can find other plants, to be sure, but it will not be long, what with the thousands of other wildflower diggers like yourself, before the goose with golden eggs is dead. We had better hurry.

I invite your attention to the fact that this ladyslipper is not the only public property which you might lift for the embellishment of your home. There are numerous paintings in the Memorial Union which you could cut out of their frames while nobody is looking. They are, I admit, less beautiful than your flower, but their loss could be more easily replaced. In the historical museum are any number of things as irreplaceable as your flower—why not add some of them to your collection? I anticipate your reply and tell you why not: because you, and also your friends and neighbors, would recog-nize your act as vandalism. You do not recognize your theft of the ladyslipper as vandalism. I will leave it to you to decide whether it is. Yours truly, Aldo Leopold Research Director, UW Arboretum

As spring approaches, FODF asks all users of the Forest not to take, pick or dig-up the wildlife. Take all the pictures you want, but PLEASE leave the wildlife be-hind for others and future generations to enjoy.

“Here is where we used to have a ladyslipper.”

There is a growing epidemic popping up in the DuPont State Forest. Wildlife Thievery! Recent studies done in and around DuPont State Forest find that there are many rare & unique vegetation on the forest floors. There is a problem. They are disappearing. People are picking & digging up plants, trampling over rare moss’s, and snapping tree limbs for no apparent reason. As spring approaches, we hope that everyone will help with stopping this problem. If you see some-one deliberately damaging or picking plants, please ask them not to. FODF received special permission to re-print this letter.

Wildlife Thieves

Pictures courtesy of Bev Parlier

Page 5: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

We often hear the tales of hikers lost in a western wilderness, usually to be found within a few days. People get lost and injured in this area as well but are usually found or are rescued in a day or so. You can take a few advance precautions which might make finding you a bit easier if you stray off course or are injured in a back area. Even a short hike can turn into a critical situa-tion if you get lost or injured, especially if you are hiking alone, or during bad weather. How well are you prepared to handle a sudden emergency that might arise on one of these ad-ventures? Things happen in the wilderness, and, to be honest, most of us are probably ill pre-pared to deal with them. Here, in Western North Carolina, you will most probably face an unfore-seen overnight stay in the woods or a medical emergency. In the Western states, you might find yourself in an extended survival situation for two or more days. Statistics show that most hikers (sightseers included) run into problems on short day hikes and that the bulk of problems arise from lack of preparation.

Here are basic rules that you should follow if you plan on hiking back to a remote area and some suggestions for items you should carry with you.

1. Always tell someone where you are going. 2. Be specific and request that they write down the info for reference or give them a map. This should be a person who will

follow up if you do not call or return within a reasonable time. 3. Dress appropriately for the weather. 4. Always carry a basic survival kit and first aid items.

Basic Survival Kit � Lightweight Mylar Space Blanket (Bronze/Silver model preferred) � Matches (Strike Anywhere) in an appropriate waterproof plastic match safe…Do not use the metal tube model which is

hard or impossible to open with one hand or cold fingers. � Butane Lighter - adjustable flame preferred � Fire starting materials: Vaseline soaked cotton balls, dryer lint, Trioxane fuel bar, candles � Large Yard Leaf bags (2) or barrel liners (2) for shelter � Bandana � Flashlight - Photon Micro light or larger � Energy bar(s) and hard candies � Whistle - Plastic - pea-less type preferred � Blaze Orange surveyor's tape 10' � Nylon cord (braided or parachute) 20-25 ft. � Map and Compass -compass always…map if you are not very, very familiar with the area � Duct Tape - 5-10' roll � Knife - your choice, pocket, belt, sheath or multi-tool - sturdy and of good quality � Water and/or purification tablets/filter � Cell Phone - ?? may not work where you are located

First Aid Kit � Pain Medicines - ibuprofen, acetaminophen and aspirin � Band-aids � Antiseptic wipes � Anti-histamine or other allergy and sting treatments � Ace bandage � Personal Rx or other necessary items you may require � Upset stomach remedy - Pepto-Bismol or equivalent * � Anti-diarrhea tablets* � Decongestant -such as Sudafed or equivalent* *Longer trip items Note that these are very basic kits. You may wish to add other items such as a sweater or poncho, adhesive tape, gauze, sutures, large dressings, tweezers, Sawyer Extractor kit, etc. Remember, the smaller the kit, the better the chances are that you will take it with you. Depending upon your own circumstances, you might want to establish Level 1 and Level 2 kits with Level 1 being the one that is always with you and Level 2 containing the supplemental items appropriate to the season and your hiking plans. By taking advance precautions, and having these items in-hand, you'll find your adventures a bit less worrisome and you will be better prepared for the unexpected.

Sight Seers & Hikers—Be Prepared By John Carney, FODF Board Member

Page 6: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

Date Event Contact Phone Limit 2/23/2008 Winter Hike to Wintergreen Falls Fred Roane 802-598-3352 15 members Meet at Guion Farms Shelter at 10 am 3/1/2008 Litter Pick-Up Peg Bresnahan 884-6806 Join the Litter Haters! Meet at Lake Imaging Parking lot at 9am 3/15/2008 Rocks and Water Hike John Carney 885-2477 25 members We will learn more about rock formations and water flow in DuPont. Meet at Buck Forest at 10 am 3/25/2008 Friends of DuPont Board Meeting Gloria Clouse 884-2006 Meet at 7 pm at Guion Farms 4/14/2008 Annual Friends of DuPont Meeting Rella Allred 828-749-5626 Pubic Meeting Meet at the Transylvania Library at 7pm for yearly reports and Volunteer recognition 4/26/2008 Spring Wildflower Hike Peg Bresnahan 884-6806 25 members

Enjoy the beauty of DuPont's Spring Wild Flowers will be led by Harriet Walls. Meet at Fawn Lake Parking lot at 10 AM 5/10/2008 Tour de Falls Gloria Clouse 884-2006 5/11/2008 Tour de Falls Shuttle Buses available to see 3 waterfalls and Lake Julia $10 donation 9am to 3pm 5/17/2008 DuPont Hosts Training and Cookout Bev Parlier 749-5626 Training for DuPont Hosts at Guion Farms Shelter 10am Lunch following 5/20/2008 Friends of DuPont Board Meeting Gloria Clouse 884-2006 Meet at Guion Farms at 7 pm 5/29/2008 Blue Ghost Firefly Hike Aleen Steinberg 885-2477 25 members 5/30/2008 Blue Ghost Firefly Hike Aleen Steinberg 885-2477 25 members Learn about these intriguing insects from Prof. Jennifer Frick Meet at Buck Forest at 9pm 6/7/2008 National Trails Day Jim Plick 962-9675 Become a supporter of some of the 80 miles of trails in DuPont Forest 6/7/2008 Litter-Pick Up Peg Bresnahan 884-6806 Join the Litter Haters! Meet at Lake Imaging Parking lot at 9am Help clean up the roadsides 6/21/2008 Botany Hike Aleen Steinberg 885-2477 20 members Enjoy a hike while identifying and enjoying plants of DuPont. Jenny Lellinger & Fred Roane 7/11/2008 Astronomy Night Gloria Clouse 884-2006 View 4 planets and summer constellations with Dr. Bob Hayward of PARI Meet at Guion Parking lot at 9PM 7/22/2008 FODF Board Meeting Gloria Clouse 884-2006 Meet at Guion Farms 7pm 8/16/2008 Summer Hike to Stone Mountain Bev Parlier 883-9278 The strenuous hike to the top of Stone Mountain provides great views. 9/20/2008 FODF Canoe Day Peg Bresnahan 884-6806 Members Canoes and snacks provided for FODF members aGloria Clouse 884-2006 Meet at Guion Farms at 7 pm 10/18/2008 Tour de Falls Gloria Clouse 884-2006 10/19/2008 Tour de Falls Gloria Clouse 884-2006 Shuttle Buses available to see 3 waterfalls and Lake Julia $10 donation 11/8/2008 Fall Hike Bev Parlier 883-9278 25 members Explore interesting areas of DuPont. Meet at Buck Forest Parking lot at 10 am 11/25/2008 FODF Board Meeting Gloria Clouse 884-2006 Meet at Guion Farms at 7 pm t Lake Julia. Meet at Fawn Lake Parking Lot 9/23/2008 FODF Board Meeting This is a schedule of planned events for 2008. More details will be available later on each event in the newsletter and by e-mail. Reservations for the taken one month before the event where there is a limit of participants. Contact

the board member listed or e-mail your reservation to [email protected]

Page 7: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

Volunteers Make a Difference

FODF BOARD ADOPTS VISION STATEMENT "The vision of the Board of FODF for DuPont State Forest is one of preserving the integrity and well being of the forest for the people of North Carolina while insuring its forestry program is fully implemented and its recreational use is well funded and managed.” “We envision adequate funding for staff and operations with a functioning visitor center and ongoing maintenance and improvement of the multi-use forest trail system. We continue to support limited vehicle access, the use of non-motorized boats on lakes and restricted over-night camping.”

We are looking for dedicated volunteers to help support the Friends of DuPont Forest and the DuPont Forest Staff. Trail Building & Work Crew: Assist in maintaining over 90 miles of trails. We need volunteers who like to get into the dirt and build or fix trails in the forest. Support assistance is also needed to carry tools, spread materials, being in charge of refreshments etc. Time needed: Can dedicate a couple of hours up to whole projects. There is a job for every level. Adopt-a-Hwy Litter Pick-up: Be part of a team of ‘Litter Haters’. We maintain DuPont/Staton Rd from Sky Valley Rd to Cascade Lake Rd. Then, Cascade Lake Rd to Reasonover Rd. and also stretches of Sky Valley Rd & Reasonover Roads. We provide bags, orange vests, and have some grabbers available. Time needed: Litter pick-up is conducted quarterly. Spend 1 day picking up or assist with all of them. Usually lasts around 3-4 hours, per event. Special Events: Volunteer your time helping with special events such as Tour de Falls, Canoe Day or at the Annual Meeting. Help is needed serving food, & refreshments at the Annual Meeting and on Canoe Day or volunteer a couple of hours during the Tour de Falls to be a parking lot attendant, gate keeper, van tour guide, ticket sales or membership ta-ble. Help is also need to plan special programs & fundraising events. Time needed: 2 hrs. +. Special Forest Interests/Educational Programs: Help plan and execute special hikes and programs in the forest such as the Botany Hike, Blue Ghost Firefly and exciting new programs. Time needed: Flexible. Membership Services: Have the time to keep up with membership activities? Can be done from your home. Stuff enve-lopes, mail renewals, organize tee shirts etc. Your ideas are needed on starting a corporate membership program and a member recognition program. Time needed: 1 hr/per week +. Parking Lot Hosts: Spend a couple of hours greeting visitors to the DuPont State Forest. Sell maps & provide informa-tion regarding the Forest & the trails to get to the waterfalls. We host the Hooker Falls & Buck Forest parking lots. Time needed: 2 hr shifts/ per weekend. Grant Writing: This is an area where we need extra help. We would like to start a crew of volunteers who have knowl-edge on writing grants to help raise money for many improvements needed in the Forest. Time needed: Flexible. History Program: We are collecting as much information regarding the property where the DuPont State Forest is now currently occupying. Research the development of the property and why, how and who lived and used the property be-fore us. Time needed: Flexible. Fundraising Efforts: Do you have a good idea to raise money for the Forest? Like to plan events that have great im-pacts? This is the area for you. We need a committee of members to raise money for such items like the completion of the Visitors Center, Tools for Trails or educational programs that are funded through FODF. Time needed: Flexible.

To find out more on how you can contribute to the development of the DuPont State Forest, Contact: President, Gloria Clouse (828)884-2006 or [email protected] or write to:

Friends of DuPont Forest PO Box 2107

Brevard, NC 28712

Page 8: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

On February 23, 2008, Fred Roane, a FODF board member and naturalist, will

lead a 4+ mile, moderate loop-hike to Wintergreen Falls. Meet at the Guion

Farm Parking area at 10:00 a.m. Wear sturdy shoes, dress for the weather,

bring a lunch and water. There is an elevation change of about 120 feet, so

be your own guide on your abilities. The access to the bottom of the Falls

can be difficult for anyone with walking limitations. We'll lunch at the base of

the Falls, then loop back to the parking lot via Sandy Trail, Bridge and Buck

Forest Roads. The large rocks at Wintergreen Falls are not really conductive

to accommodate many people. This hike is limited to 15 hikers. Contact Fred

at: [email protected] or call (802) 598-3352 to register.

Wintergreen Falls Hike Planned By Fred Roane, FODF Board Member

Interested in Hiking? We received the following e-mail from a FODF Member: “I have only been here a couple of years and just now getting into wanting to hike in DuPont etc. I would like to meet some people/individuals that might be interested in having another person to hike with. Male or female, doesn't matter. I am 60 yrs+, very active and love the outdoors. I have enjoyed the people that I have met with FODF very much. I thought perhaps you might know of someone looking for a friendly person to hike with. I work part-time so am somewhat flexible with days of the week. I live in Hendersonville.” E-mail us at [email protected] and we will connect fellow members with similar interests.

Icy Wintergreen Falls Photo courtesy of Bev Parlier

Lake Julia Pier Built By Chris McDonnell, FODF Member

On November 9-112007, Western Piedmont Community College was on site in the Forest with one instructor and 13 students. They completed the rebuilding of the pier at Lake Julia and added a step-down platform making it eas-ier to get in and out of canoes/kayaks. They also com-pleted Phase 1 of Fawn Lake on Sunday. This pier is now very solid and looks great.

Last September, FODF gave them a grant of $250 after completing the steps at Triple Falls. They were very ap-preciative of this and I received a call December 2006 asking what projects we would like to have done in 2007. In 2007 they completed building a ramp/platform at Bridal Veil Falls, the rebuilding of Fawn Lake pier and this past September, the pier at Lake Julia. It is estimated that they saved the Forest around $15,000 in labor for all these projects. FODF's part in all this is to provide food for the students and materials for the projects. We look forward to working with David Brown and Western Piedmont CC for pro-jects in 2008.

Page 9: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

Litter Hater Alert! By Peg Bresnahan, FODF Board Member

On Saturday, March 1st, we will meet at Lake Imaging Parking Lot, 9 a.m. Grabbers and vests avail-able on a first come first serve basis. Gloves and bags provided. Wear sturdy shoes, bright clothing and a cap. The next litter pick up will be Saturday, June 7th. Same time, same place. Please call Peg Bresnahan at 884-6806 or email [email protected] Reasons to be there:

Page 10: February 2008 Newsletter (1.28 MB)

Friends of DuPont Forest

PO Box 2107

Brevard, NC 28712

Receive a special Friends of

DuPont Forest decal when

you join or renew your

membership with FODF

Gloria Clouse, President John Carney, Vice President Rella Allred, Secretary Kent Wilcox, Treasurer Nancy Black Peg Bresnahan Karen Cutright Chuck Cordray Tom Fanslow Tom Fortener Lynn Harton Jeff Jennings Lydia O’Dell Bev Parlier Jim Plick Fred Roane Sandy Schenk Aleen Steinberg

FODF Board of Directors

Membership Get Involved

� Student (1 Year) $10 I would like to volunteer

� Friend (1 Year) $25 � Trail Building & Work Crew

� Family (1 Year) $35 � Adopt-a-Hwy Litter Pick-Up

Donate at a level of $50 or more, receive a free Friends of DuPont Forest T-shirt ( S, M, L, XL, XXL ) Circle one

� Special Events (Tour de Falls, Canoe Day, etc)

� Partner (1 Year) $50 � Special Forest Interest/Educational Programs

� Supporter (1 Year) $100 � Membership Services

� Hooker Falls Contributor (1 Year) $ 250 � Parking Lot Greeters

� Triple Falls Contributor (1 Year) $ 500 � Grant Writing

� High Falls Contributor (1 Year) $1000 � DuPont State Forest History Program

� Forest Angel (1 Year) $1001+ � Fundraising Efforts

� Additional Donation $___________________ � Other ___________________________________________

� Save the stamps. Please E-mail my newsletter to the E-mail address listed below

Mail this form to: Friends of DuPont Forest

P.O. Box 2107

Brevard, NC 28712

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Presort Std

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PAID Permit 341

28739