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Learning Community 3 Andrea Jones, Holly Hughes, Debbie Phillips, and Cynthia Vetter

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Learning Community 3Andrea Jones, Holly Hughes, Debbie Phillips,

and Cynthia Vetter

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Camden ISD is an urban school district located in southeast Texas.

CISD encompasses 35 elementary schools, 12 middle schools, 6 high schools, and 1alternative campus.

CISD serves approximately 75,000 students. According to PEIMS data, 41% of the student population

is Hispanic, 39 % African-American, 19 % White, and 1% other.

28% of teachers in 2010-2011are beginning teachers. Teacher turnover rate was 24% in 2009-2010. For the 2011-2012 school year, CISD is anticipating 500

new teachers.

“Working conditions emerge as highly predictive of teachers intentions to remain in or leave their schools” (Ladd, p.4,2009).

CVetter
needs page number
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Camden ISD has received a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The purpose of the grant is:

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1. Critical Needs of Camden I.S.D.2. Action Plan for New Teacher

Mentorship3. INTASC Standards4. Conferencing Cycle5. Data Collection6. Evaluation of Mentorship Experience7. References

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A Grant Steering Committee was established to first determine the needs to better support Camden’s new teachers.

Information was gathered from multiple stakeholders and data was gathered from a variety of sources.

The New York State District Teacher Mentoring Programs Rubric was reviewed by the committee to determine the effectiveness of Camden’s current mentor plan.

http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/pdf/rubric.pdf

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“The most frequent reasons given for leaving urban classrooms include the teachers’ expressed concerns regarding the lack of professional support and less than desirable working conditions rather than the factors directly related to the characteristics and dispositions of urban student populations” (Helfeldt, Capraro, Capraro, Foster, &Carter, 2009).

Camden ISD teachers participated in a Teaching and Learning Conditions Survey at the end of the 2009-10 school year. (The New Teacher Center)

Survey was developed with the assistance of The New Teacher Center and assessed teacher perceptions of the following:LeadershipFacilities and ResourcesTeacher EmpowermentProfessional DevelopmentTime to CollaborateTeacher Evaluation

CVetter
probably needs a website for citation
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Creating face-to-face communities on campuses as well as online communities that can extend beyond the campus level.

District Mentor Coordinator collaborates with Mentor Coaches to develop recruiting and training plan.

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E-mentoring through listserv discussions, email, and electronic conferencing such as Skype

Assists in implementation of the State Board of Education’s Technology Application Standards for All Beginning Teachers. The standards are located at http://www.sbec.state.tx.us/sbeconline/standtest/standards/techapps_allbegtch.pdf

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Year 1 Year 2 Year 3May 2011 Identify Steering Committee

May 2012 Reconvene Steering Committee

May 2012 Reconvene Steering Committee

May 2011 Conduct Needs Assessment and Identify Goals

May 2012 Conduct Needs Assessment and Revise Goals

May 2013 Conduct Needs Assessment and Revise Goals

May 2011 Identify Planned Sequential Activities

May 2012 Revise Planned Sequential Activities

May 2013 Revise Planned Sequential Activities

June 2011 Select District Mentor Coordinators

July 2012 Mentorship Development Course: Foundations of Mentoring for 1st Year Mentors

July 2013 Mentorship Development Course: Foundations of Mentoring for 1st Year Mentors

June 2011 Identify and Train Mentor Coaches

July 2012 Mentorship Development Course: Cognitive Coaching for 2nd Year Mentors

July 2013 Mentorship Development Course: Cognitive Coaching for 2nd Year Mentors

July 2011 Recruit and Survey Mentorship Teams

Aug.2012 Match Mentees with Active Mentors

July 2013 Mentorship Development Course: Inquiry and Research for 3rd Year Mentors

July 2011 Provide Mentorship Development Course: Foundations of Mentoring

Aug. 2012 Provide Mentee Professional Development Instructional Course

Aug. 2012 Match Mentees with Active Mentors

Aug. 2011 Match Mentees with Active Mentors

On-going: Engage in Mentorship Coaching Cycle Requirements

Aug. 2012 Provide Mentee Professional Development Course

Aug. 2011 Provide Mentee Professional Development Instructional Course

On-going PLCs organized by Mentor Coaches for Mentors around current issues/challenges in mentoring

On-going: Engage in Mentorship Coaching Cycle Requirements

On-going: Engage in Mentorship Coaching Cycle Requirements

May 2012 Implement action research component: Mentors will identify a “burning question” to examine in year three and create plan for gathering data

On-going PLCs organized by Mentor Coaches for Mentors around current issues/challenges in mentoring

On-going PLCs organized by Mentor Coaches for Mentors around current issues/challenges in mentoring

May 2012 Steering Committee Collects Data and Evaluates Mentor Program

May 2012 Steering Committee Collects Data and Evaluates Mentor Program

May 2012 Steering Committee Collects Data and Evaluates Mentor Program

May 2012 Share action research data and identify publishing or presenting opportunities

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Oversee and monitor implementation of training for Mentor Coaches and Mentors

Serves a link between district administration and new teachers Works in tandem with the Technology Coordinator Co-facilitates listserv discussions with the Technology Mentor

Coordinator Aggregates data regarding mentor program for the district and

the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Supports mentoring for novice teachers that promotes “reflective,

student-centered instruction, subject matter knowledge, the use of formative assessment, analyses of student learning, and culturally relevant pedagogy” (Youngs, Quian, & Holdgreve-Resendez, 2010, p. 61).

Supports mentoring for novice teachers that “fosters a commitment to and a passion for social justice to help the mentor and mentee navigate the tensions that exist between survival (responding to the bureaucracy and micro-politics of teaching in an urban school) and success (focus on all students’ learning and their own professional learning)” (Yendol-Hoppey, Jacobs, & Dana, 2009, p.36.)

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Works in tandem with Mentor Coordinator Co-facilitates listserv discussions with the Mentor

Coordinator, Mentor Coaches, and Mentors Assists in implementation of the State Board of

Education’s Technology Application Standards for All Beginning Teachers. The standards are located at http://www.sbec.state.tx.us/sbeconline/standtest/standards/techapps_allbegtch.pdf

Supports the use of technology as a learning tool for students

Assists the Technology Mentor Coach and the Technology Mentors in developing and implementing technology supported lessons

Creates and maintain data base of FAQs regarding technology and technology infused lesson plans

Creates and implements training and protocols for e-mentoring

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Serves as liaison between Coordinators and Mentors

Content-Area and Grade Level Coaches will assist Mentors in providing long-term, sustained professional development in content-area pedagogy

Mentor the Mentors Technology Coach will, in conjunction

with the Technology Coordinator and Mentor Coordinator and other coaches, facilitate listserv discussions

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Serve as guides, advocates, supporters, friend, advocate, and role model for novice teachers (Pitton, 2006, p. 10)

Expert at content-area pedagogy Assist in creating lesson plans Conduct observation cycles Will introduce novices to a social justice stance and assist

in focusing on the needs of culturally diverse students Technology Mentors will be located at each campus and

will deliver technology supported demonstration lessons to novice teachers and assist novice teachers in developing technology infused lesson plans

Technology Mentors will provide just-in-time tech support to novice teachers

Technology Mentors will assist in the application the State Board of Education’s Technology Application Standards for All Beginning Teachers. The standards are located at http://www.sbec.state.tx.us/sbeconline/standtest/standards/techapps_allbegtch.pdf

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Special MjEducation Mj

Mentor Coach Mj

Electives/ MjVocational Mj

Mentor Coach Mj

Math MjMentor Coach Mj

Social Studies MjMentor Coach Mj

Science MjMentor Coach Mj

English MjLanguage Arts MjMentor Coach Mj

Mentor MjCoordinator Mj

Elementary MjMentor Coach Mj

Technology MjMentor Mj

Coordinator Mj

Technology MjMentor Coach Mj

Mentors Mj Mentors Mj Mentors Mj Mentors Mj Mentors Mj Mentors Mj Mentors Mj Mentors Mj

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Technology MjMentors MjContent Mj

Area/ MjGrade MjLevel Mj

Mentors Mj

Mentor MjCoordinator& MjTechnology MjCoordinator Mj

(1) Mj

Mentor MjCoaches (1 Mj

each for MjElementary, Mj

Math, Science, MjSocial Studies, Mj

English MjLanguage Mj

Arts, Electives/ MjVocational, Mj

Special MjEducation and Mj

Technology Mj

Novice MjTeacher Mj

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Performance• Identify and designed lessons for active engagement. • Assessment of individual learning styles and needs.• Intentional linking to prior knowledge to new learning.• A community of learning is developed where differences are respected.

Performance• Demonstrates a sensitivity to cultural differences.• Communicates through a variety of media tools to enrich learning.• Effective questioning strategies to probe for learner understanding.

Performance• Uses observation feedback, information about students, and data to evaluate the outcome of teaching and learning. • Seek out resources to support own learning.• Draws upon colleagues for reflection.

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“Mentors will be more effective if they develop the ability to use the conferencing cycle to provide feedback to the novice teacher.” (Pitton, 2006, p.84)

Goals for Pre-Observation•Identify the focus of the observation.•Identify objective for the lesson.•Describe lesson structure for student engagement.•Identify success indicators and evaluation.

Goals for Observation•For mentors to be unobtrusive as possible.•Gather evidence of what is happening.•Be objective in information gathering.

Goals for Post Observation•Support Mentee’s reflection on the lesson through guided questions.•Support the mentee’s reflection to plan for future action steps.•Formally or informally create an action plan to enhance their skills.

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In order to provide formative feedback to novice teachers, a minimum of five conferencing cycles will be provided by their mentor.

Two conference cycles will focus with a lens on instructional technology within the classroom.

Three conference cycles will be focused with a lens on the instructional practices.

Additional cycles will be added as needed by the novice teacher.

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Qualitative Quantitative

Case Studies Interview – face to face, e-mail,

focus group, online focus group, telephone interviews.

Documents – Analyze public documents (i.e. students tests scores, homework & class assignments, surveys, questionnaires, minutes & agendas).

Audiovisual materials – Collect electronic messages, email or videotape an individual or group.

AEIS Reports

Teacher Turnover Rate

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#3 The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and

creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

#7 The teacher plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students,

the community, and curriculum goals.

Camden School DistrictObservation FormMentee: Mentor:Date: Class/Grade:

3. Diverse Learners Demonstrates familiarity with students’

cultural, ethnic, and experiential backgrounds. Demonstrates familiarity with student

differences in learning capabilities and approaches.

Provides learning opportunities that are adapted for students with diverse backgrounds and exceptionalities.

  Evidence:

Camden School DistrictObservation FormMentee: Mentor:Date: Class/Grade:

7. Planning Instruction Articulates clear learning goals for the lesson

that are appropriate for the students and the content.

Selects teaching methods, activities, and materials appropriate for students and content

Plans for instruction; aligns goals, instructions, and evaluation.

Evidence:

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Camden School District Interview Questions: Case Study for Mentees What are your views of technology use in the classroom?

Were you able to teach any lessons using technology? Please explain.

How do you believe students learn and acquire new information?

Were you able to use technology to support other student learning activities? Please describe.

 What practices of your mentor helped support you and your use of technology in teaching situations?

 What practices of your mentor helped support you in your use of technology for

professional practice situations, such as keeping track of student data, using online communications, gathering research or information from the internet, or recording, professional practice information such as lessons plans?

 Were there any things your mentor did that you found particularly helpful or supporting

or encouraging your use of technology? Were there any factors that inhibited your use of technology? What are your plans for the future regarding technology use in education?

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Camden School DistrictInterview Questions: Case Study for Mentors  What do you believe you can do to support your mentee use of technology?  What do you believe you need to do to help your mentee to use during the semester? Did you recommend any web resources? Please identify? Did you encourage them to consult with the technology coordinator? In what way? Did you suggest any other teachers or staff as resources? Did you identify any software resources? Which ones and why?  What strategies or practices did you use with your mentee to help them integrate

technology in their lessons?  What strategies or practices did you use with your mentee to help them integrate

technology in their professional practice?  Did you have any instances where you learned something about technology from your

mentee? Please describe. 

Source: Journal of Research on Technology in Education (2004).

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Camden ISDParental Partnership Workshop Survey

 Parent’s Name___________________________Address_________________________________Student’s name___________________________ Grade_______ Parent Volunteer InformationI would like to volunteer: Yes____ No____Please check how you would like to volunteer____PTA (Parent Teacher Association) ____Field Trip Chaperone____Teacher Assistance ____Site Based Decision Making Team____Clerical/Receptionist ____OtherTimes and Days Available: M T W Th F Workshop InformationPlease check the workshops you are interested in attending____Understanding Credits Needed to Graduate____College Preparation and Funding____ESL (English second language)____Attendance and Dropout Prevention____TAKS and Other School Wide Tests____Social and Personal Issues Affecting my ChildWorkshop TimesPlease check the best time you are available to attend a workshop___ Morning (8:00 am – 10:00 am) ___Afternoon (11:00 am – 1:00 pm)

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Brock, B. & Grady, M. First year to first-rate: Principals guiding beginning teachers. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press.

Darling-Hammond, L. (2010, May). What kind of change can we believe in? Toward an equitable system of good schools. 2010 Distinguished contributions to education research award (2009) lecture. Proceedings at the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado. Retrieved from: http://www.aera.net/Default.aspx?id=6112

Helfeldt, J., Capraro, R., Capraro, M., Foster, E. , Carter, N. (2009). An urban schools-university partnership that prepares and retains quality teachers for “high needs” schools. The Teacher Educator, 44(1), 1-20.

Pitton, D. (2006). Mentoring novice teachers. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press.

Yendol-Hoppey, D., Jacobs, J., & Dana, N. (2009). The complexity of mentoring in an urban context. The New Educator, 5(1), 25-44.

Youngs,P., Quian, H., & Holdgreve-Resendez, R. (2010). Teacher induction for diverse urban contexts. In J. Wang, S. Odell, & R. Clif (Eds), Past, present, and future research on teacher induction (pp. 57-73). Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.