Ghazali's Selbstbiographieby Heinrich Frick

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<ul><li><p>Ghazali's Selbstbiographie by Heinrich FrickReview by: D. B. MacdonaldIsis, Vol. 4, No. 3 (Apr., 1922), p. 508Published by: The University of Chicago Press on behalf of The History of Science SocietyStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/223832 .Accessed: 09/05/2014 10:57</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>The University of Chicago Press and The History of Science Society are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize,preserve and extend access to Isis.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 194.29.185.208 on Fri, 9 May 2014 10:57:57 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=ucpresshttp://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=hsshttp://www.jstor.org/stable/223832?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>isis. iv. 1922 isis. iv. 1922 </p><p>greater distance between Straumsfjord and Hop than the author </p><p>assumes, if we are to place any confidence in the account regarding the climatic differences of these two places. </p><p>In any case Mr. GATHORNE-HARDY'S interesting and well written book will convince the reader that we are dealing here with historical facts. But since we are on historical ground we ought to use the </p><p>proper word to designate the nationality of these discoverers. It is </p><p>customary to call them Norse, and this associates them in the mind of most people with Norway and Norwegians. So far as we know, they were, however, all natives of Iceland, except ERIC the Red, and his </p><p>part in these voyages is inconsequential. They should therefore be called Icelandic. To call them Norse is similar to calling Admiral PEARY an English explorer. </p><p>(Ithaca, N. Y.) HALLD6R HERMANNSSON. </p><p>Heinrich Frick. - GHAZALI'S Selbstbiographie. Ein Vergleich mit AUGUSTINS Konfessionen. Leipzig: HINRICHS, 1919. iv, 84 S. (Verof- fentlichungen des Forschungs Instituts fur vergleichende Reli- </p><p>gionsgeschichte an der Universitat, Leipzig, Nr 3). </p><p>This is a very careful and detailed comparison of GnIAZZALi'S Mun- </p><p>qidh and AUGUSTINE'S Confessiones considered as records of the </p><p>spiritual developments and ( conversions )) of these authors. Dr. FRICK traces the evident agreements, almost verbal, in these experiences not to any borrowing but to a common basis in Neoplatonism. This is certainly right and nine-tenths of his further results will probably hold. But when he constructs the ultimate difference between the two theologians round the conception of personality his footing is less certain and his view would probably be corrected by a wider reading in GHAZZALI and in the other Moslem mystics It is true that their ideas on personality have not been much studied by western scholars; but he might turn, in the first instance, to chapter II, ( The Perfect Man )), in R. A. NICHOLSON'S recent Studies in Islamic Mysticism. </p><p>Further, that this little book is noticed here at all is due to the fact that GHAZZALI covered in his writings all the knowledge of his time from physics to metaphysics and that our present rather arbitrary limitations as to what may be called (l science )) do not hold in the slightest in his world. The student there must be ready to look everywhere or he is certain to lose much. Thus the connection of this book with our modern A science ) is through psychology. </p><p>(Hartford, Con.) D. B. MACDONALD. </p><p>greater distance between Straumsfjord and Hop than the author </p><p>assumes, if we are to place any confidence in the account regarding the climatic differences of these two places. </p><p>In any case Mr. GATHORNE-HARDY'S interesting and well written book will convince the reader that we are dealing here with historical facts. But since we are on historical ground we ought to use the </p><p>proper word to designate the nationality of these discoverers. It is </p><p>customary to call them Norse, and this associates them in the mind of most people with Norway and Norwegians. So far as we know, they were, however, all natives of Iceland, except ERIC the Red, and his </p><p>part in these voyages is inconsequential. They should therefore be called Icelandic. To call them Norse is similar to calling Admiral PEARY an English explorer. </p><p>(Ithaca, N. Y.) HALLD6R HERMANNSSON. </p><p>Heinrich Frick. - GHAZALI'S Selbstbiographie. Ein Vergleich mit AUGUSTINS Konfessionen. Leipzig: HINRICHS, 1919. iv, 84 S. (Verof- fentlichungen des Forschungs Instituts fur vergleichende Reli- </p><p>gionsgeschichte an der Universitat, Leipzig, Nr 3). </p><p>This is a very careful and detailed comparison of GnIAZZALi'S Mun- </p><p>qidh and AUGUSTINE'S Confessiones considered as records of the </p><p>spiritual developments and ( conversions )) of these authors. Dr. FRICK traces the evident agreements, almost verbal, in these experiences not to any borrowing but to a common basis in Neoplatonism. This is certainly right and nine-tenths of his further results will probably hold. But when he constructs the ultimate difference between the two theologians round the conception of personality his footing is less certain and his view would probably be corrected by a wider reading in GHAZZALI and in the other Moslem mystics It is true that their ideas on personality have not been much studied by western scholars; but he might turn, in the first instance, to chapter II, ( The Perfect Man )), in R. A. NICHOLSON'S recent Studies in Islamic Mysticism. </p><p>Further, that this little book is noticed here at all is due to the fact that GHAZZALI covered in his writings all the knowledge of his time from physics to metaphysics and that our present rather arbitrary limitations as to what may be called (l science )) do not hold in the slightest in his world. The student there must be ready to look everywhere or he is certain to lose much. Thus the connection of this book with our modern A science ) is through psychology. </p><p>(Hartford, Con.) D. B. MACDONALD. </p><p>508 508 </p><p>This content downloaded from 194.29.185.208 on Fri, 9 May 2014 10:57:57 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p>Article Contentsp.508</p><p>Issue Table of ContentsIsis, Vol. 4, No. 3 (Apr., 1922), pp. 455-654Volume Information [pp.648-654]Front Matter [pp.455-458]Richard Wallingford: (1292?-1335) [pp.459-465]L'Evolution du regne metallique d'apres les Alchimistes du XVIIe siecle [pp.466-482]On the History of Caloric [pp.483-492]Notes and Correspondence [pp.493-498]Reviewsuntitled [pp.499-500]untitled [pp.501-502]untitled [pp.502-503]untitled [pp.504-505]untitled [pp.505-508]untitled [p.508]untitled [p.509]untitled [pp.510-512]untitled [pp.512-514]untitled [pp.514-515]untitled [pp.515-516]untitled [pp.516-517]untitled [pp.517-519]untitled [pp.519-521]untitled [pp.521-522]untitled [pp.522-523]untitled [pp.523-530]untitled [pp.530-532]untitled [pp.532-535]untitled [pp.535-536]untitled [p.537]untitled [pp.537-538]untitled [pp.538-539]untitled [pp.539-540]untitled [pp.540-544]untitled [pp.544-545]untitled [pp.545-548]untitled [pp.548-549]untitled [pp.549-553]untitled [pp.554-556]untitled [pp.556-557]untitled [pp.557-558]untitled [pp.558-560]untitled [pp.560-562]untitled [pp.563-564]untitled [pp.564-565]untitled [pp.565-566]untitled [pp.566-567]untitled [pp.567-568]untitled [pp.568-571]</p><p>Twelfth Critical Bibliography of the History and Philosophy of Science and of the History of Civilization (to March 1922) [pp.572-647]Back Matter</p></li></ul>