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  • Slide 1
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  • Goals of a Fire Prevention Program Goals of a Fire Prevention Program Fire Prevention Strategy Fire Prevention Strategy Methods of Fire extinguishing Methods of Fire extinguishing Housekeeping Issues Housekeeping Issues Electrical Fire Hazards Electrical Fire Hazards Types of Extinguishers Types of Extinguishers How to use Fire Extinguishers How to use Fire Extinguishers Evacuation Evacuation
  • Slide 4
  • Life Safety Life Safety The primary goal of fire safety efforts is to protect building occupants from injury and to prevent loss of life. The primary goal of fire safety efforts is to protect building occupants from injury and to prevent loss of life. Property Protection Property Protection The secondary goal of fire safety is to prevent property damage. The secondary goal of fire safety is to prevent property damage. Protection of Operations Protection of Operations By preventing fires and limiting damage we can assure that work operations will continue. By preventing fires and limiting damage we can assure that work operations will continue.
  • Slide 5
  • The Strategy of Preventing a Fire A fire must have three things to ignite and maintain combustion: A fire must have three things to ignite and maintain combustion: Fuel Fuel Heat Heat Oxygen Oxygen The basic strategy of fire prevention is to control or isolate sources of fuel and heat in order to prevent combustion. The basic strategy of fire prevention is to control or isolate sources of fuel and heat in order to prevent combustion. If all three are not present in sufficient quantities a fire will not ignite or a fire will not be able to sustain combustion If all three are not present in sufficient quantities a fire will not ignite or a fire will not be able to sustain combustion
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  • FIRE TRIANGLE ( FOH ) FUEL A combustible substance either solid, liquid or gas OXYGEN usually air which contains approx. 20 % oxygen. Heat Required heat, it varies from material to material.
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  • Risks of Fire Impact on the organisation: Structural damage to buildings Structural damage to buildings Loss financial, reputation, facilities, research, expertise, and lost work Loss financial, reputation, facilities, research, expertise, and lost work Impact on the environment: Pollution water, air, soil, flora & fauna. Pollution water, air, soil, flora & fauna.
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  • Risks of Fire Impact on human life: Physical injuries e.g. burns, smoke inhalation! Physical injuries e.g. burns, smoke inhalation! Psychological effects e.g. post traumatic stress syndrome Psychological effects e.g. post traumatic stress syndrome Occupational issues e.g. loss of earnings, unemployment, work related stress. Occupational issues e.g. loss of earnings, unemployment, work related stress. Loss of life Loss of life
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  • Fire at Bradford 11th May 1985 ? Time? ? How many died? ? Why? 3-4 Minutes 3-4 Minutes 56 people lost their lives, 265 injured 56 people lost their lives, 265 injured Cause match or cigarette stubbed out in a polystyrene cup, fuelled by rubbish underneath wooden stand. Cause match or cigarette stubbed out in a polystyrene cup, fuelled by rubbish underneath wooden stand. Very Poor standards of fire safety & housekeeping Very Poor standards of fire safety & housekeeping
  • Slide 10
  • Methods of Fire Extinguishing( SBC) Starvation Removal of fuel This is a method in which the surrounding materials are removed from the seat of fire to starve, without supply of fuel the fire will be starved and extinguished. For example fire in a Field can be starved by removing the material which caught fire.
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  • Methods of Fire Extinguishing( SBC) Blanketing / Smothering Removal of oxygen In this method the oxygen supply of the fire ares will be cut off. Naturally the fire will be off because of lack of oxygen. For example fire in a Bowl can be extinguished by covering it with plate Blanket on human
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  • Methods of Fire Extinguishing( SBC) Cooling Removal of Heat Water is normally used for cooling the fire because it has the greatest heat absorbing It is the best fire fighting media for solid fires like Wood, Leaves, Cotton & Charcoal. But it should not be used in Inflammable liquid Fires petrol Gas Fires - Nitrine Metal Fires Sodium & Potassium.
  • Slide 13
  • Good housekeeping habits are an important part of a safe workplace. Why is good housekeeping important? To reduce amounts of flammable and combustible materials. To reduce amounts of flammable and combustible materials. To reduce ignition hazards. To reduce ignition hazards. To ensure safe emergency evacuation of occupants. To ensure safe emergency evacuation of occupants. To allow for quick emergency response. To allow for quick emergency response.
  • Slide 14
  • General Housekeeping Guidelines Work areas, aisles, walkways, stairways, and equipment should be kept clear of loose materials, trash, scraps, etc. Work areas, aisles, walkways, stairways, and equipment should be kept clear of loose materials, trash, scraps, etc. Never block aisles, fire exits, emergency equipment, or alarm pull stations with equipment or materials. Never block aisles, fire exits, emergency equipment, or alarm pull stations with equipment or materials. Avoid build up of combustible trash and waste such as paper, wood, cardboard, etc. Avoid build up of combustible trash and waste such as paper, wood, cardboard, etc. Keep use and storage of flammables and combustibles to a minimum. Keep use and storage of flammables and combustibles to a minimum. Clean up all spills such as grease, oil, or water immediately. A delay could result in accidents. Clean up all spills such as grease, oil, or water immediately. A delay could result in accidents.
  • Slide 15
  • Storage Guidelines No storage is allowed in corridors and stairwells. A cluttered hallway could slow down emergency evacuation. No storage is allowed in corridors and stairwells. A cluttered hallway could slow down emergency evacuation. Storage must not exceed a plane of 18 inches below sprinkler heads or smoke detectors. Storage that breaks this plane may prevent sprinkler heads from fully covering room during a fire. Storage must not exceed a plane of 18 inches below sprinkler heads or smoke detectors. Storage that breaks this plane may prevent sprinkler heads from fully covering room during a fire. A simulated example of how storage can protrude into 18 inch plane below sprinkler heads. NOTICE Storage guidelines are applicable to all locations within ISU buildings and are not limited to storage rooms. This includes stored materials in offices, labs, etc.
  • Slide 16
  • Storage Guidelines All storage must be at least 3 ft from electrical panels. In some emergency situations it will be necessary to access these panels quickly. All storage must be at least 3 ft from electrical panels. In some emergency situations it will be necessary to access these panels quickly. Maintain at least a 3ft clearance from heating surfaces, air ducts, heaters, and lighting fixtures. Maintain at least a 3ft clearance from heating surfaces, air ducts, heaters, and lighting fixtures. Storage of combustible materials in mechanical rooms is prohibited. Storage of combustible materials in mechanical rooms is prohibited. Improper Storage in front of Electrical Panel Improper Mechanical Room Storage
  • Slide 17
  • Electrical hazards are the cause of numerous workplace fires each year. Faulty electrical equipment or misuse of equipment produces heat and sparks that serve as ignition sources in the presence of flammable and combustible materials. Electrical hazards are the cause of numerous workplace fires each year. Faulty electrical equipment or misuse of equipment produces heat and sparks that serve as ignition sources in the presence of flammable and combustible materials. Examples of common ignition hazards: Examples of common ignition hazards: overloading circuits overloading circuits use of unapproved electrical devices use of unapproved electrical devices damaged or worn wiring damaged or worn wiring Fire Safety-Electrical Issues
  • Slide 18
  • Extension cords Extension cords Extension cords are only approved for temporary use. They may only be used for a period of three days or less. Instead of using extension cords contact Operations Dept. to install permanent wiring. Extension cords are only approved for temporary use. They may only be used for a period of three days or less. Instead of using extension cords contact Operations Dept. to install permanent wiring. When using extension cords check for defaults such as frays, brittleness, or broken wires. When using extension cords check for defaults such as frays, brittleness, or broken wires. Never place extension cords in high traffic areas where they can be damaged by being stepped on or run over by equipment. Never place extension cords in high traffic areas where they can be damaged by being stepped on or run over by equipment. Electrical Fire Safety
  • Slide 19
  • Multi-plug strips Multi-plug strips Should only be used for office equipment such as computers, printers, and fax machines. Should only be used for office equipment such as computers, printers, and fax machines. Other common items such as microwaves, refrigerators, and copy machines must be plugged directly into wall outlets. Other common items such as microwaves, refrigerators, and cop