grade 3 mathematics blended ccss fcat 2.0

Download Grade 3 Mathematics  Blended CCSS FCAT 2.0

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Grade 3 Mathematics Blended CCSS FCAT 2.0. Prepare to be amazed by the Magic Mathematician!!!. Pretest. Group Norms and Housekeeping. Group Norms: Participate Ask questions Work toward solutions Limit side bars Listen with an open mind Punctuality. Logistics: Rest Rooms - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Grade 3 Mathematics Blended CCSS FCAT 2.0

  • Prepare to be amazed by the Magic Mathematician!!!

  • Pretest

  • Group Norms and HousekeepingGroup Norms:ParticipateAsk questionsWork toward solutionsLimit side barsListen with an open mindPunctuality

    Logistics:Rest RoomsPhone CallsBreaksLunch

  • What do you know and want to know aboutBig Idea One and CC3.OA.1,2,3,4

    K

    WL

  • Third Grade Big Idea 1

  • 3.OA.1 Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.

    3.OA.2 Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division.

    3.OA.3 Multiply and divide within 100.

    3.OA.4 Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.

    Common Core State Standards

  • CCSSM stands for Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Standards for Mathematical PracticeStandards for Mathematical Content

  • Compare the Standards

  • Standards for Mathematical PracticeDescribe varieties of expertise that educators should seek to develop in their students.Example: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.Standards for Mathematical ContentDefine what students should understand and be able to do.

    Example: Fluently add and subtract within 5

  • Standards for Mathematical PracticeMake sense of problems and persevere in solving themReason abstractly and quantitativelyConstruct viable arguments and critique the understanding of othersModel with mathematicsUse appropriate tools strategicallyAttend to precisionLook for and make use of structureLook for and express regularity in repeated reasoning

  • How does the Mathematical Practice apply to this problem:There are 42 chairs in the music room. If the teacher puts 7 chairs in each row, how many rows will be there be?

  • Browards Implementation Timeline

  • MA.3.A.1.1 Model multiplication and division including problems presented in context: repeated addition, multiplicative comparison, array, how many combinations, measurement, and partitioning.

  • Content LimitsItems may include whole-number multiplication facts from 0 x 0 through 9 x 9 and the related division facts

    Items may include division problems with remainders expressed only as whole numbers. Items will not require interpretation of the remainder.

  • MA.3.A.1.1 Model multiplication and division including problems presented in context: repeated addition, multiplicative comparison, array, how many combinations, measurement, and partitioning.

  • MA.3.A.1.1 Model multiplication and division including problems presented in context: repeated addition, multiplicative comparison, array, how many combinations, measurement, and partitioning.

  • Ip, Ip Array!!!!

  • MA.3.A.1.1 Model multiplication and division including problems presented in context: repeated addition, multiplicative comparison, array, how many combinations, measurement, and partitioning.

  • How do you compare?On your white board, write a multiplicative comparison word problem that would work for this picture.

  • Its a fact!

  • MA.3.A.1.1 Model multiplication and division including problems presented in context: repeated addition, multiplicative comparison, array, how many combinations, measurement, and partitioning.

  • FCAT Sample Question

  • On your sticky note, write a division problem for the following:20 5 =

  • MA.3.A.1.1 Model multiplication and division including problems presented in context: repeated addition, multiplicative comparison, array, how many combinations, measurement, and partitioning.

  • MA.3.A.1.1 Model multiplication and division including problems presented in context: repeated addition, multiplicative comparison, array, how many combinations, measurement, and partitioning.

  • Two basic types of problems in divisionMeasurement: You have a group of objects and you remove subgroups of a certain size repeatedly. The basic question ishow many subgroups can you remove?Example: You have 15 lightning bugs and you put three in each jar. How many jars will you need?

  • Two basic types of problems in divisionPartitive (Sharing): You have a group of objects and you share them equally. How many will each get?Example: You have 15 lightning bugs to share equally in three jars. How many will you put in each jar?

  • MA.3.A.1.2 Solve multiplication and division fact problems by using strategies that result from applying number properties.

  • Benchmark ClarificationStudents will recognize equivalent representations of equations or expressions by using number properties, including the commutative, associative, distributive, and identity properties for multiplication and division and the zero property of multiplication.

  • Content LimitsItems will not include identifying the properties by name.Items will not require the use of more than two properties to convert one expression or equation to its equivalent.

    Items may include only factors or divisors of 0 through 9.

  • MA.3.A.1.2 Solve multiplication and division fact problems by using strategies that result from applying number properties.

  • Why teach the Distributive Property?

  • Why teach the Associative Property?

  • FCAT Sample Question

  • MA.3.A.1.3 Identify, describe, and apply division and multiplication as inverse operations.

  • Content LimitsItems may include whole-number multiplication facts from 0 x 0 through 9 x 9 and the related division facts.Items will not include identifying the inverse property by name.

  • MA.3.A.1.3 Identify, describe, and apply division and multiplication as inverse operations.

  • Fact Families

  • FCAT Sample Question

  • Big Idea 1 Video Podcast

  • What Supporting Ideas are found in this Big Idea?MA.3.A.4.1 Create, analyze, and represent patterns and relationships using words, variables, tables and graphs (ADDRESSED IN BIG IDEA 3 TRAINING)MA.3.A.6.1 Represent, compute, estimate and solve problems using numbers through hundred thousands.

    MA.3.A.6.2 Solve non-routine problems by making a table, chart, or list and searching for patterns (ADDRESSED IN BIG IDEA 3 TRAINING)

    MA.3.S.7.1 Construct and analyze frequency tables, bar graphs, pictographs, and line plots from data, including data collected through observations surveys, and experiments.

  • MA.3.A.6.1 Represent, compute, estimate and solve problems using numbers through hundred thousands.

  • Content LimitsNumbers may be represented flexibly; for example: 947 can be thought of as 9 hundreds, 4 tens, and 7 ones; 94 tens and 7 ones; or 8 hundreds, 14 tens, and 7 ones.

    Items may include the inequality symbols (,=, ). Students will not be expected to name the estimation strategies or be restricted to using a specific strategy.

    Front-end estimation will not be an acceptable estimation strategy.

    Decimals may be used in the context of money that estimate to a whole dollar.

  • MA.3.A.6.1 Represent, compute, estimate and solve problems using numbers through hundred thousands.

  • PLACE VALUE is a fundamental feature of our number system. A thorough understanding of place value developed early through concrete experiences, is necessary in order for students to achieve computational fluency. ,

  • Grab and Go!!

  • FCAT Sample Question

  • MA.3.S.7.1 Construct and analyze frequency tables, bar graphs, pictographs, and line plots from data, including data collected through observations surveys, and experiments.

  • Content LimitsItems may require the student to choose the most appropriate data display given a set of data from observations, surveys, and/or experiments. Items may assess identifying parts of a correct graph and recognizing the appropriate scale. The increments used on the scale are limited to units of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, or 100. Pictographs can use keys containing a scale of 1, 2, 5, or 10. The data presented in graphs should represent no more than five categories. The total sample size for bar graphs should be no more than 1,000. The total sample size should be no more than 200 for frequency tables, pictographs, and line plots. Addition, subtraction, or multiplication of whole numbers may be used within the item.

  • MA.3.S.7.1 Construct and analyze frequency tables, bar graphs, pictographs, and line plots from data, including data collected through observations surveys, and experiments.

  • Teaching for depth

  • Line PlotsLine plots may be confusing to some students. It is easy to mix up the numbers below the number line and the number of Xs above it. Students need to remember that the numbers below the number line are like the categories in a pictograph or a bar graph. In a line plot, these categories are numerical. The number of Xs above each number on the number line tells how many times this number or category occurs.

  • Grab and Go 2.9

  • Juan, Cindy, and Larry are each growing a tomato plant at school. The chart below shows how many tomatoes they have picked.

    How many tomatoes did they pick all together?

  • *Use the pictograph to give the correct answer Suppose each ticket represents 4 votes. How many children did not vote for the roller coaster as their favorite ride?20 people41 people21 people42 people42

    Favorite RideTilt-a-WhirlFerris WheelMerry-Go-RoundRoller Coaste