guide to immortals

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A DM's guide to Immortals, primarily based around a Dungeons & Dragons world. For any number of players, ages 14 and up.

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  • Fantasy Adventure Game

    Dungeon Master's Guide to ImmortalsBy Frank Mentzer

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    T h e Multiverse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Physical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Other Notes on Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    T h e Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Goals of the Immortals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Immortal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .New Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Sphere of Entropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Experience Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Adventure Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    25

    12

    14151819232325

    center of bookReference Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Creatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Creature Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    272728

    51

    inside back coverSpells o f Entropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Editing: Anne Gray McCreadyDevelopment: Harold JohnsonCover Art: Larry ElmoreIllustrations: Jeff Easley

    Larry ElmoreTypesetting: Linda Bakk

    Kim Lindau

    C1986 TSR, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

    This book has been designed for use with theDUNGEONS & DRAGONS Basic, Expert,Companion, and Master Sets. It does not explainhow to play the game. You must have the Basic,Expert, Companion, and Masters rules before youcan use this set.

    DUNGEONS & DRAGONS and D&D are registeredtrademarks owned by TSR, Inc. BATTLESYSTEM andthe TSR logo are trademarks owned by TSR, Inc. 1986TSR, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

    This book is protected under the copyright laws of theUnited States of America. Any reproduction or otherunauthorized use of the material or artwork containedherein is prohibited without the express written consent ofTSR, Inc.

    Distributed to the book trade in the United States byRandom House, Inc., and in Canada by Random Houseof Canada, Ltd. Distributed to the toy and hobby trade byregional distributors.

    Printed in the U.S.A. First Printing June, 1986

    TSR, Inc. TSR UK, Ltd.PO Box 756 The Mill, Rathmore RoadLake Geneva, WI Cambridge, UK53147 CB14AD

  • The Multiverse

    "Whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire,This longing after Immortality?"

    CatoJoseph Addison (1672-1719)

    Before you study th i s section, you should befamil iar wi th the notes in the D&D Com-panion Set which describe the Ethereal andElemental Planes, vortices, and wormholes(DMC pages 18-19). You should also befamiliar wi th the five Spheres of Power, asdescribed in this set. Before we break newground, a brief review is in order, and somenew details are added to these now-familiartopics.

    Planes of ExistenceIn game terms, the phrase "plane of exist-ence" (or simply Plane) refers to an area seenby mortal beings as a three-dimensional vol-ume of unmeasurable size. This is differentthan in geometry, in which a plane is a flattwo-dimensional area. One Plane containsthe PC homeworlds, other planets, moons,stars, other objects, and vast distancesbetween them in which there is almost noth-ing. This plane is called the Prime Plane (ormerely the Prime).

    Any attempt at f inding an end to this spacewill fail, for it extends without end in all nor-mal directions (height, width, etc.). Any suchplane of inf ini te size is tailed a universe.

    One other plane, the Ethereal, touches thePrime at all points. Most adventurers fromthe Prime are quite familiar with the Ether,for it can be entered by using various magicaleffects and devices. The Ether is also an areathrough which characters must pass to reachthe nearby planes of the four elements. ThePrime and Elemental planes are connectedby tubes that reach through the Ether, form-ing a branching network very similar to theroots of a tree.

    From a greater perspective, this group of

    six planes of existencethe Prime, Ether,and the four Elemental Planesare collec-tively called the Inner Planes.

    The Inner Planes are surrounded by theAstral Plane, which is connected to the Ele-mental and Ethereal Planes but not to thePrime. Ear beyond the Inner Planes, acrossthis vast "astral ocean," are other planes ofexistence, the homes of the Immortals andother beings. These other planes are com-monly called the Outer Planes, a provincialand relative term that is nevertheless in com-mon use because of the Prime-planar originof most Immortals.

    Only three of the known planes of exist-ence are inf ini te in sizethe Prime, Ethe-real, and Astral. All others are limited, or"bounded" planes, or pocket universes.

    Together, all these planes, bounded andinf in i te , Inner and Outer, is collectivelycalled the Multiverse.

    The Importance of the PrimeThe Prime Plane is special in several ways. Itis the only one in which the five Spheres ofPower (Matter, Energy, Time, Thought, andEntropy) all blend together perfectly, in pre-cisely equal proportions. It is also the onlyplane in which the four elements of Air,Earth, Fire, and Water blend perfectly, againin equal proportions. Every other plane ofexistence contains some imbalance in ele-ments, Spheres, or both.

    All Immortals, including those of Entropy,are extremely careful not to disturb the bal-ance of all things in the Prime Plane. Theircaution is in their own self-interest, for thePrime Plane is the only plane from which newImmortals consistently arise. For Immortalscannot create Immortal offspring. The only

    way Immortals can replenish their numbers,to maintain their commanding positions ascontrollers of all of existence, is by finding,encouraging, and testing exceptional mortalswho wish to achieve Immortality.

    Breeding experiments have not improvedthe odds. On the rare occasions when Immor-tals have masqueraded as mortals (as docu-mented by dozens of ancient myths), theiroffspring were mortals and neither more norless likely to achieve Immortality than otherhumans of purely mortal origin. Such med-dling poses dangers to the balance of thePrime that such at tempts were abandonedlong ago.

    Potential Immortals are often discoveredin planes other than the Prime, but few ofthese succeed in reaching Immortal i ty. Thosewho do reach I m m o r t a l i t y have neverachieved greatness within the Immortal hier-archy. Immortals believe that this is becauseof the flaws caused by the imbalances in thenative planes of such creatures.

    DimensionsJust as the five Spheres govern the mul t i -verse, five dimensions govern each plane ofexistence. Each dimension is a way of mea-suring physical size or distance. Each dimen-sion is a real direction perpendicular to everyother. Time, often mistakenly called thefourth dimension, is not a direct ion, but oneof the Spheres.

    Imagine one dimension as a straight lineon a piece of paper. Another l ine crossing it ata 90 degree angle shows a second direction,forming a plus sign on the paper. To add athird direction perpendicular to both, imag-ine a line passing through the center of theplus, leading above and below the fiat paper

    2

  • The Multiverse

    Easy so far, for most of us. But the nextdimension is in a direction perpendicular toall three of those lines, a direction that we asplayers are simply not equipped to see. Wecan, however, assume that our Immortalcharacters can see, use, live within, and evenignore this dimension as naturally as we dothe first three.

    Thus, a mortal can be simply defined as abeing who is equipped to perceive only threedimensions at once. An Immortal can per-ceive four dimensions at oncebut four only.

    However, a fifth direction lurks around thecorner, perpendicular to all of the first fourdimensions. It is normally as impossible forImmortals to see this fifth direction as it is forhumans to perceive the fourth. Its effect onmortals, who rarely but occasionally catchglimpses of its existence, can be horrifying.Mortals commonly call this fifth direction theDimension of Nightmares. This bothersomename does not denote a place; it is a simpletag attached, through ignorance, to a direc-tion that no mortal or Immortal can perceive.

    Although all five directions are real, mea-surable distances, the latter two are com-monly called "imaginary" dimensions bymortals. This is merely a natural refusal toadmit their reality; they exist nevertheless.

    The five known dimensions have beengiven names to define what each dimension iscommonly used to measure when used inconjunction with other dimensions. The firstdimension measures length or dis tancebetween two points, and thus has a beginningand an end. The second dimension measuresbreadth and direction of the object in the firstdimension. The third dimension measuresvolume or magnitude or size of an object.The fourth dimension defines the relationbetween two objects, finding all points of