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i Guizhou Cultural and Natural Heritage Protection and Development Project Environmental Impact Assessment Guiyang Hydropower Investigation Design & Research Institute China Hydropower Engineering Consultation Group Corporation September 18, 2008 E1912 V1 Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized

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  • i

    Guizhou Cultural and Natural Heritage Protection and Development Project

    Environmental Impact Assessment

    Guiyang Hydropower Investigation Design & Research Institute

    China Hydropower Engineering Consultation Group Corporation

    September 18, 2008

    E1912V1

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    Table of Contents 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 1

    1.1 Project Background.................................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Overview of EIA ........................................................................................................................ 1

    2 EIA Preparation.......................................................................................................................................... 3 2.1 EIA Classification...................................................................................................................... 3 2.2 Basis for EIA Preparation ........................................................................................................ 4

    2.2.1 Laws and Regulations...................................................................................................... 4 2.2.2 Documents......................................................................................................................... 5 2.2.3 Screening of World Bank’s Safeguard Policies............................................................ 5

    2.3 Applicable Standards ............................................................................................................... 5 2.3.1 Environmental Standards ................................................................................................ 5 2.3.2 Standards for Pollutant Discharge.................................................................................. 6

    2.4 Assessment Scope ................................................................................................................ 12 2.5 Assessment Methods ............................................................................................................ 12

    3 Project Description................................................................................................................................... 12 3.1 Project Objective .................................................................................................................... 12 3.2 Overview of the Project ......................................................................................................... 13

    3.2.1 Minority Cultural Heritage Protection in Villages........................................................ 13 3.2.2 Ancient Town Protection ................................................................................................ 13 3.2.3 Natural Heritage Protection and Utilization................................................................. 14 3.2.4 Heritage Protection and Tourism Service Facilities Construction in Gateway Cities 14 3.2.5 Technical Assistance ...................................................................................................... 14

    3.3 Description of Project............................................................................................................. 15 3.3.1 Location and Investment ............................................................................................... 15 3.3.2 Description of Facilities .................................................................................................. 19 3.3.3 Generic Design ............................................................................................................... 19 3.3.4 Typical and Special Works ............................................................................................ 20 3.3.5 Construction Period........................................................................................................ 24

    4 Policy and Legal Framework ................................................................................................................... 25 4.1 Policy Framework ................................................................................................................... 25

    4.1.1 Overview of Guizhou Provicnial Tourism Development Master Plan...................... 25 4.1.2 Relation with the Master Plan ....................................................................................... 25 4.1.3 Guizhou Rural Tourism Development Plan 2006....................................................... 27 4.1.4 Guizhou Eleventh Five Year Socio-ecnomic Plan ..................................................... 27 4.1.5 Other Relevant Documents........................................................................................... 28

    4.2 Legal Framework.................................................................................................................... 28 4.2.1 Cultural Heritage Protection .......................................................................................... 28 4.2.2 Environmental Assessment ........................................................................................... 30 4.2.3 Geological Relics Protection ......................................................................................... 30 4.2.4 Scenic Area Planning ..................................................................................................... 32

    4.3 Institutional Arrangement ...................................................................................................... 33 5 Baseline Conditions.................................................................................................................................. 34

    5.1 General .................................................................................................................................... 34 5.1.1 Geographic Location ...................................................................................................... 34 5.1.2 Meteorological Condition ............................................................................................... 34 5.1.3 History............................................................................................................................... 34

    5.2 Socio-Economic Conditions.................................................................................................. 34 5.2.1 Demographics and Population...................................................................................... 34 5.2.2 Ethnic Minorites............................................................................................................... 34 5.2.3 Economy and Poverty .................................................................................................... 35

    5.3 Administrative Districts .......................................................................................................... 35 5.4 Natural Resources.................................................................................................................. 35

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    5.4.1 Biodiversity....................................................................................................................... 35 5.4.2 Surface Water.................................................................................................................. 36

    5.5 Cultural and Natural Heritage Assets .................................................................................. 36 5.5.1 World Natural Heritage................................................................................................... 36 5.5.2 Other Areas of Global Significance .............................................................................. 36 5.5.3 National Cultural and Natural Heritages...................................................................... 37 5.5.4 Other Cultural and Natural Heritages .......................................................................... 37

    5.6 Cultural and Natural Heritages in Project Area .................................................................. 38 5.6.1 Scenic Areas.................................................................................................................... 38 5.6.2 Geo-Parks........................................................................................................................ 40 5.6.3 Protected Cultural Relics Unit....................................................................................... 42 5.6.4 Famous Historical and Cultural Town .......................................................................... 43 5.6.5 Other Cultural Heritages ................................................................................................ 43

    5.7 Environmental Management................................................................................................. 46 5.7.1 Solid Waste Management ............................................................................................. 46 5.7.2 Wastewater Treatment ................................................................................................... 47

    5.8 Environmental Baseline in Project Cities ............................................................................ 47 5.8.1 Environmental Concerns ............................................................................................... 47 5.8.2 Environmental Monitoring Results ............................................................................... 48

    6 Environmental Impacts and Mitigation.................................................................................................... 53 6.1 Social Impacts and Benefits ................................................................................................. 53

    6.1.1 Social Impacts at Strategic/Provincial Level ............................................................... 53 6.1.2 Specific Benefits of Components.................................................................................. 56 6.1.3 Land Occupation and Resettlement ............................................................................ 58

    6.2 Risks of Adverse Impacts at Strategic and Provincial Level ............................................ 58 6.2.1 Cultural Heritage Impacts and Mitigation .................................................................... 58

    6.3 Specific Risks Likely in All Sites ........................................................................................... 60 6.3.1 Impacts on Eco-environment ........................................................................................ 60 6.3.2 Impact on Water Environment ...................................................................................... 63 6.3.3 Impact on Ambient Air and Mitigation .......................................................................... 67 6.3.4 Impact on Acoustic Environment and Mitigation ........................................................ 68 6.3.5 Impact of Solid Waste and Mitigation .......................................................................... 69 6.3.6 Landscape and Visual Impacts and Mitigation........................................................... 70

    6.4 Potential Impacts to Specific Sites and Mitigation............................................................. 75 6.4.1 Risk of Overdevelopment in the National Scenic Areas ........................................... 75 6.4.2 Guanlin National Geo-Park ........................................................................................... 75 6.4.3 Xingyi National Geo-Park .............................................................................................. 76 6.4.4 Wanfenglin National Scenic Area ................................................................................. 76 6.4.5 Shamu River National Scenic Area.............................................................................. 77

    7 Heritage Conservation Plan...................................................................................................................... 79 7.1 Conservation Plan for Classified Heritages........................................................................ 79 7.2 Specific Considerations and Recommendations ............................................................... 80

    7.2.1 Inventory Development .................................................................................................. 80 7.2.2 Standards ......................................................................................................................... 80 7.2.3 Qualification ..................................................................................................................... 80 7.2.4 Monitoring ........................................................................................................................ 81 7.2.5 Public Awareness Promotion ........................................................................................ 81 7.2.6 Construction Planning .................................................................................................... 81

    7.3 Institutional Arrangement ...................................................................................................... 81 7.4 Suggestions on Conservation Plans ................................................................................... 82 7.5 Reporting ................................................................................................................................. 82

    8 Alternative Comparison ........................................................................................................................... 84 8.1 With and Without the Project Scenario ............................................................................... 84 8.2 Location Alternatives.............................................................................................................. 85

    8.2.1 Jiuzhou Fortress Museum ............................................................................................. 85

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    8.3 EA Suggestions in Project Development Process............................................................. 86 9 9 Public Consultation and Information Disclosure .................................................................................. 91

    9.1 Objective and Principle.......................................................................................................... 91 9.2 First Round of Public Consultation ...................................................................................... 91 9.3 First Round Information Disclosure ..................................................................................... 92 9.4 The Second Round of Public Consultation......................................................................... 93 9.5 Second Round of Information Disclosure ........................................................................... 94 9.6 Consultation Result Statistics ............................................................................................... 94 9.7 Results of Social Environment Assessment....................................................................... 98 9.8 Main Concerns and Public Opinions ................................................................................... 98

    10 Environment Management and Monitoring Plan ..................................................................................... 99 10.1 Environment Mitigation Measures ....................................................................................... 99 10.2 Institutional Arrangement ...................................................................................................... 99 10.3 Training Plan ......................................................................................................................... 100 10.4 Environment Supervision Plan ........................................................................................... 107 10.5 Environmental Management Plan..................................................................................... 108 10.6 Environment Monitoring Plan ............................................................................................. 115 10.7 Monitoring Reporting System ............................................................................................. 118 10.8 Environmental monitoring and acceptance report of sub-projects ............................... 118 10.9 Cost Estimate........................................................................................................................ 119

  • 1

    Introduction Project Background Guizhou Province is located in southwest China and is known for its large rural population and underdeveloped economy. Poverty reduction has thus become a priority of the province’s socioeconomic development strategy. The Guizhou Provincial Government has adopted policies to promote tourism development of the province’s natural and cultural heritage, for the ultimate economic benefit of the local people. The Provincial Government also recognizes the need to balance the economic benefits from tourism development with environmental protection and heritage conservation. The proposed Guizhou Cultural and Natural Heritage Protection and Development Project will develop local resources of cultural and natural heritage in a sustainable manner. This will promote economic growth and create employment opportunities, and improve the living conditions of the local population. Overview of EIA In July 2007, the World Bank Project Office of Guizhou Province contracted the Guiyang Hydropower Investigation Design & Research Institute (GHIDI), a subdivision of the China Hydropower Engineering Consultation Group Corporation (CHECC), to undertake the Environmental Impact Analysis (EIA) for the proposed project. Based on the requirements of the Environmental Impact Assessment Law of PRC, the Decree on Construction Project Environmental Protection (also known as State Council Decree No.253) and relevant World Bank safeguard policies, a full set of EIA documentation has been prepared. The Provincial Environmental Protection Bureau (EPB) – the overall administrative agency for the project’s EIA evaluation – requires that an integrated environmental impact assessment report be prepared given the nature of the project, which contains a large number of components in rural areas. This document is prepared for the review and approval of the Guizhou Provincial EPB, and also for the clearance of the World Bank The EIA will provide a solid ground to optimize project design and management so that the project environmental benefits can be maximized and the potential adverse impacts minimized. This report follows the guidelines of the World Bank OP4.01 and the relevant technical EIA guidelines in China. The outline is summarized below: y Chapter 1, Introduction: describes the project background and gives a brief introduction of the

    report structure y Chapter 2, EA Preparation: presents applicable standards, scope of analysis, basis for EA and

    other technical criteria used in the EA process y Chapter 3, Project Description: provides information on project content for each of the

    components (including location maps where appropriate) to help understand the project. It includes the necessary details to assess project impact, including main project scales, quantity of engineering works, component costs budget and implementation schedule

    y Chapter 4, Policy and Legal Framework: presents a description and analysis of associated policies and legal and institutional context

    y Chapter 5, Baseline Conditions: briefly describes the environmental and social baseline information within the project areas.

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    y Chapter 6, Environmental Impacts and Mitigation: is the main section of the report, which summarizes environmental impacts and mitigation measures. It presents a general matrix of the components that have similar impacts or specific impact analysis, and then offers mitigation suggestions for the components that may cause a significant impact

    y Chapter 7, Heritage Conservation Plan: presents a plan to conserve any heritage that would be affected by the project

    y Chapter 8, Alternative Analysis: presents alternative analysis by components, with comprehensive comparison for all feasible alternatives in terms of environmental, social, technical and financial considerations, including maps with captions where appropriate.

    y Chapter 9, Public Consultation and Information Disclosure: describes the public consultation process applied during the EA and summarizes details in tables (i.e. dates, places, approaches, number of participants, main issues expressed, and responses in EIA/design). The chapter also describes the mechanism applied for information disclosure.

    y Chapter 10, Environmental Management Plan: presents a set of serious programs and measures to be taken during project implementation, including (1) Environmental Management and Supervision for each component, (2) Summary of Mitigation Measures, (3) Institutional Capacity Building/Training Plan and (4) Monitoring Plan.

  • 3

    EIA Preparation EIA Classification The proposed project will finance a number of small-scale developments of tourist attractions at many locations across Guizhou Province. Although the environmental impact caused by most project components is considered insignificant, several components are located within areas that are classified as either national level geo-parks or national level scenic areas; it is here where the project might cause significant impact due to the nature of these sites. These areas include 2 provincial scenic areas, 2 national scenic areas, 2 national geological parks, 1 national cultural relic protection unit, 1 provincial cultural relic protection unit and some minority cultural protection areas and regions (see Table 2.1-1) which are located in 2 municipalities and 2 prefectures respectively in Guizhou province (see Figure 2.1-1). According to Operational Policy 4.01 of the World Bank, this project falls into Category A for EA preparation, and thus a full set of EA documents are required to prepare given the features of the project.

    Table 2.1-1 Summary of Affected Areas Name of Component

    Site Location Sensitive Area Classification Level

    Date of Establishment

    Administration Opinions

    Shamu river cultural and natural heritage protection

    Shibing county, Qiandongnan prefecture

    Huangping Jiuzhou ancient town heritage protection

    Jiuzhou town, Huangping county, Qiandongnan prefecture

    Wuyanghe national scenic area

    National (Huangping Jiuzhou Town is a National Cultural Relics Protection Unit)

    1998

    Wanfenglin scenic area cultural and natural heritage protection

    Xinyi county, Qianxinan prefecture

    Malinghe canyon-Wanfeng lake national scenic area

    National 1994

    Zhaoxing Dong cultural heritage protection

    Zhaoxing town, Liping county, Qiandongnan prefecture

    Liping Dong village national scenic area

    National 2004

    Tianlong fortress cultural heritage protection

    Tiantai mountain, Tianlong town, Pingba county, Anshun city

    Tiantai mountain-Shila river provincial scenic area

    Provincial 2003

    Longli ancient town heritage protection

    Longli town, Jinping county, Qiandongnan prefecture.

    Jinping Sanbanxi-Longli ancient town provincial scenic area

    Provincial 2001

    The Guizhou Provincial Construction Agency has already approved construction that will take place in these sensitive regions in principle with an official letter

  • 4

    Name of Component

    Site Location Sensitive Area Classification Level

    Date of Establishment

    Administration Opinions

    Guanling national geological park heritage protection

    Tan mountain, Xinpu village, Guanling county, Anshun city

    Guanling national geological park

    National 2003

    Xingyi national geological park and Dingxiao Guizhou dragon heritage protection

    Dingxiao development district, Xingyi county, Qianxinan prefecture

    Xingyi national geological park

    National 2004

    The Guizhou Provincial Land Resource Agency has already approved construction that will take place in these sensitive regions in principle with an official letter

    Sanmentang cultural heritage protection

    Sanmentang village, Tianzhu county, Qiandongnan prefecture

    Sanmentang ancient buildings cultural relic protection unit

    National 2002

    Danzai Shiqiao paper manufacture cultural heritage protection

    Shiqiao, Nangao village, Danzai county, Qiandongnan prefecture

    Shiqiao-white-paper-workshop cultural relic protection unit

    Provincial 2005

    The Guizhou Provincial Culture Agency has already approved construction that will take place in these sensitive regions in principle with an official letter

    Figure 1.2-1 Location of the components in Guizhou

    Basis for EIA Preparation

    Laws and Regulations

    During the preparation of environmental assessment, all relevant regulatory, policy, and administrative requirements – both at state and provincial levels – were followed, as were the World Bank’s ten safeguard policies. Major laws and regulations applied in the EA are as follows:

    z Laws of Environmental Protection of the PRC of December 26, 1989 z Law of Air Pollution Control of the PRC of September 1, 2000 z Law of Water Pollution Control of the PRC of May 15, 1996 z Law of Environmental Noise Pollution Control of the PRC of March 1, 1997 z Law of Cultural Relics Protection of the PRC of October 28, 2002 z Management Regulations on Environmental Protection for Construction Projects of

    November 18, 1998 z Circulation on Strengthening EIA for Construction Projects Receiving International

    Financing of 1993 z Technical Specifications for Environmental Impact Assessment z Regulations on Establishment of Geological Natural Reserve, 1987 z Regulations of Cultural Protection in Guizhou Province, 2005

  • 5

    z The Principles for Conservation of Heritage Sites in China

    Documents

    A number of documents include feasibility study reports for various project components, as well as expert and government officials’ opinions in the screening stage. The main documents that have been reviewed and used in the EA are:

    z Guizhou Provincial Tourism Development Master Plan, World Tourism Organization, China National Tourism Administration and Guizhou Provincial Tourism Administration, 2002

    z Guizhou Rural Tourism Development Plan, Guizhou Provincial Research and Communication Center for Cultural Tourism, 2006

    z Guizhou Eleventh Five Year Socio-economic Plan z Feasibility Study Reports for Each Component z Master Plan for each component area z Strategic Environmental Assessment Study, ERM

    As the size of each component is very small, the Guizhou Provincial EPB requires that a consolidated EIA report be prepared for the project and that approval of the report be obtained.

    Screening of World Bank’s Safeguard Policies

    The World Bank requirements include Operational Policies (OP), Best Procedure (BP), Good Practice (GP) and Operational Directives (OD), as well as the Bank’s standard list of ten safeguard policies. These ten are:

    z Environmental Assessment (OP/BP/GP4.01); z Forestry (OP/GP4.36); z Natural Habitats (OP/BP4.04); z Safety of Dams (OP/BP4.37); z Pest Management (OP4.09); z Involuntary Resettlement (OP4.12); z Indigenous People (OD4.20); z Cultural Property (OP4.11); z Projects in Disputed Areas (OP/BP/GP7.60); and z Projects on International Waterways (OP/BP/GP7.50).

    Of these safeguard policies, Environmental Assessment (OP 4.01) is the primary requirement and thus the focus of this report. In addition, policies on Involuntary Resettlement (OP4.12), and Cultural Property (OP4.11) will be applied in the EA – at the very least during the screening stage or fully, if they are triggered. Applicable Standards Environmental Standards The environmental standards applicable in the preparation of this EIA are summarized in Table 2.3-1 below A. Ambient Air Quality

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    Class II of Ambient Air Quality Standard (GB3095-1996) is used as given in Table 2-3-1 below.

    Table 2-3-1 Class II of Ambient Air Quality Standard (GB3095-1996)

    Pollutant Sampling Timing Standard

    Annual average 0.06

    Daily average 0.15 SO2

    (mg/m3)Hourly average 0.50

    Annual average 0.10 PM10(mg/m3) Daily average 0.15

    Annual average 0.08

    Daily average 0.12 NO2

    (mg/m3)Hourly average 0.24

    B. Acoustic Environment

    The specific standards used are listed in Table 2-3-2 below.

    Table 2-3-2� Noise Standard Unit�LAeq�dB(A) Class Area to be applied Day Night

    0Areas requiring very quiet environment such as villa blocks,

    and 5-star hotel 50 40

    1 Area centered on education and residence 55 45

    2 Area mixed with residences, business and industry 60 50

    3 Industrial area 65 55

    4 Area along two sides of trunk roads 70 55

    C. Surface Water

    Standard for Surface Water Quality (GB3838-2002) is used for assessing the impact on surface water quality, as shown in Table 2-3-3 below.

    Table 2-3-3� Class III and IV Standard for Surface Water Quality Unit: mg/l

    Pollutant COD BOD5NH3-

    NP N Cu Zn F- Se As Hg Cd C6+r Pb

    Class III 20 4 1.0 0.2 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.01 0.05 0.0001 0.005 0.05 0.05

    Class IV 30 6 1.5 0.3 1.5 1.0 2.0 1.5 0.02 0.1 0.001 0.005 0.05 0.05

    Standards for Pollutant Discharge A. Air Pollutant Emission

    The waste gas emission follows the Class II of Integrated Air Pollutant Emission Standard (GB16297-1996), as shown in Table 2-3-4 below.

    Table 2-3-4� Integrated Air Pollutant Emission Standard

  • 7

    Allowable emission velocity (kg/h) Pollutant

    Allowable concentration

    (mg/m3) Stack height (m)

    Class II

    Control point for dispersion emission (mg/m3)

    15 3.5

    20 5.9

    30 23 Particulates 120

    30 0.29×10-3

    The peak concentration outside the site boundary

    15 0.18

    20 0.30 Asphalt gas 75

    30 1.3

    Obvious emission without control/treatment is not allowed

    Air pollution sources are forbidden from being built at the sensitive areas given in Section 2.1. For the urban air monitoring component, any flue gas emissions that come from boilers that will be installed later will follow the Boiler Flue Gas Emission Standards (GB 13271-2002), as shown in table 2-3-5 below.

    Table 2-3-5 Boiler Flue Gas Emission Standards

    Pollutants Dust

    concentration (mg/m3)

    SO2concentration

    (mg/m3)

    Blackness (degree)

    Stack height (m)

    Limit 50 100 I Not less than 8m

    B. Wastewater The discharge of wastewater follows the Class II Standards of Integrated Wastewater Discharge (GB8978-1996), the Standards for Integrated Wastewater Discharge for Wei River (Shanxi Section DB61-224-1996), or the Class III Standards of Integrated Wastewater Discharge (GB8978-1996). These standards will be applied to different bodies of water, as shown in table 2-3-6 below.

    Table 2-3-6 Wastewater Discharge Standard Unit: mg/l

    Pollutant COD BOD5 SS pH

    Class II 135 50 150 6�9

    Class III 500 300 400 6�9

    Construction effluent and domestic sewage which could lead to class II or III surface water should be treated and reused, and should not be allowed to directly discharge into water at sensitive areas given in Section 2.1. The wastewater treatment facilities will follow the Class B of Category I discharge standard for municipal wastewater treatment plants (GB 18918-2002).

    Table 2.3-7 Discharge Standard for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Unit: mg/l (daily average) Pollutant COD BOD5 SS Oil TN TP NH3-N Fecal Coli

    form

  • 8

    Class B, Category I

    60 20 20 3 20 1 20 103

    C. Noise z Construction noise The noise during construction phase follows the Noise Level Limits at Construction Site Boundary (GB12523-90), as shown in Table 2 -3-8 below.

    Table 2-3-8 Noise Limit for Construction Site Boundary (GB12523-90) Unit: dB(A)

    Noise limit Construction stage

    Major source of noise

    Daytime Night time

    Earth & stone work

    Bulldozer, excavator, loader, etc. 75 55

    Piling Pile driver, etc. 85 Forbidden

    Structuring Concrete mixer, etc. 70 55

    Finishing Crane, elevator 65 55

    z Plant Boundary Noise

    The Noise at the plant boundary under the urban air monitoring component follows Class I Standards for Noise at Industrial Enterprise Boundary (GB12348-90); the area under the bus hub and maintenance yard follows Class II Standards for Noise at Industrial Enterprise Boundary (GB12348-90), as shown in Table 2-3-9 below.

    Table 2-3-9 Standard for Noise at Industrial Enterprise Boundary Unit: Leq[dB(A)]

    Class Day Night

    I 55 45

    II 60 50

    The noise in construction and operation phase should be under 55dB in the daytime and 45dB at nighttime.

  • 9

    Table2.3-1 Thestandardsof surfacewater environment, ambient air and acoustic environmental qualities

    Construction sites

    Items(GB3838-2002)

    SurfaceWater Quality Standards(GB3838-2002)

    Ambient Air Quality Standards(GB3095-1996)

    Urban Regional Environmental NoiseStandards(GB3096-93)

    Tianlong fortressculturalheritageprotection III 2 2

    Jiuzhou fortressculturalheritageprotection

    III 2 2Anshun CityGuanling nationalgeological park heritageprotection

    III 1 1

    Biashavillageculturalheritageprotection II 2 2

    Duliujiang Dong culturalheritageprotection

    II 2 2

    Danzai Miao culturalheritageprotection

    III 2 3

    Jiuzhou ancient townheritageprotection

    III 2 2

    Yangashanational culturalregion heritageprotection

    III 2 1

    Longli ancient castleheritageprotection

    III 2 2

    Bala river Miao culturalheritageprotection in Kailiregion

    II 2 2

    Bala river Miao culturalheritageprotection in Kailiregion in Leishan region

    II 2 2

    Xijiang Miao culturalheritageprotection

    II 2 2

    Zhaoxing Dong culturalheritageprotection

    III 2 2

    Sanbao village culturalheritageprotection

    III 2 2

    Qiandongnan prefecture

    Shanmu river cultural andnatural heritageprotection

    III 1 1

  • 10

    Table2.3-1 Thestandardsof surfacewater environment, ambient air and acoustic environmental qualities

    Construction sites

    Items(GB3838-2002)

    SurfaceWater Quality Standards(GB3838-2002)

    Ambient Air Quality Standards(GB3095-1996)

    Urban Regional Environmental NoiseStandards(GB3096-93)

    Shidong cultural heritageprotection III 2 2

    Sanmentang culturalheritageprotection

    III 2 1

    Ethnic minoritiescultureand history museum

    III 2 2

    Liping tourism informationcenter

    III 2 2

    Jianhe tourism informationcenter

    III 2 1

    Xingyi national geologicalpark and Dingxiao Guizhoudragon heritageprotection

    III 2 2

    Wanfenglin scenic spotcultural and natural heritageprotection

    III 2 2Qianxinanprefecture

    Buyi cultural and naturalheritageprotection

    III 2 2

    Tourism informationdevelopment forinternational tourismcollegeof Guizhou normaluniversity

    III 2 2GuiyangCity

    Guizhou tourism capabilitydevelopment

    III 2 2

    Remark:SurfaceWater Environmental Quality Standards(GB3838-2002) class II: pH6~9; DO�6; COD�15; BOD5�3; NH3-N�0.5; Coli-group�2000SurfaceWater Environmental Quality Standards(GB3838-2002) class III: pH6~9; DO�5; COD�20; BOD5�4; NH3-N�1.0; Coli-group�2000Ambient Air Quality Standards (GB3095-1996) class I TSP: 0.12mg/m3 daily average, NO2: 0.08mg/m

    3 daily averageand 0.12mg/m3 hourly averageAmbient Air Quality Standards (GB3095-1996) class II TSP: 0.3mg/m3 daily average, NO2: 0.08mg/m

    3 daily averageand 0.12mg/m3 hourly averageUrban Regional Environmental Noise Standards (GB3096-93) category 1: LAeq 55dB in daytime and LAeq 45 dB in night timeUrban Regional Environmental Noise Standards (GB3096-93) category 2: LAeq 60dB in daytime and LAeq 50 dB in night time

  • 11

    Urban Regional Environmental Noise Standards (GB3096-93) category 3: LAeq 65dB in daytime and LAeq 55 dB in night time

  • 12

    Assessment Scope The scope of assessment is given in Table 2.4-1 below.

    Table 2.4-1 The scope of EIA Assessment segment

    Assessment scope

    Social environment

    2 municipalities and 2 prefectures involved in the project: Guiyang City, Anshun City, Qianxinan prefecture, Qiandongnan prefecture in Guizhou province.

    Eco-environment The construction areas, resettlement areas and especially the eco-environmental protection areas.

    Water environment

    The surface water involved during construction of river improvement, sewage disposal, water supply and sewage works, and water purifying facility etc.

    Ambient air and acoustic environment

    The infrastructure construction areas such as roadways, parking areas, entry areas, water supply and sewage works, power circuit, environmental health facilities.

    Assessment Methods The methodology used in the assessment is given in Table 2.5-1 below. Table 2.5-.1 Techniques and Method used in this EIA

    Assessment segment

    Methods Objects

    Verification tablez Compare with the Recommended scheme and alternatives

    (including without the project). Correlation z Optimize and select the construction scheme. Alternative Selection Expert consulting

    z Analyze professional opinions. Information collection

    z Collect fundamental data about regional environment and socioeconomic situation.

    Field investigation

    z Assess situation of eco-environment, water environment, acoustic environment, and ambient air.

    Environmental situation investigation

    “3S” integral technique

    z Collect data on the situation of vegetative cover, land utilization and soil erosion.

    Environmental impact identification

    Matrix matching z Identify environmental impacts and match them to

    assessment factors.

    Information disclosure

    z Provide a general outline including the objectives, content and potential impact of the project during initial consultation.

    z Provide a draft of EIA report with generalized conclusion during consultation, and subsequently finish the draft.

    Feasibility studies

    z Study the construction program and the draft of EA achievement.

    Expert consulting

    z Analyze professional opinions about environment factor.

    Public consultation

    Questionnaire z Survey environmental issues and the concerns of the local

    population and non-governmental organizations.

    Project Description

    Project Objective

  • 13

    The project’s overall objective is to increase economic benefits for national parks and local communities (including minority groups) by encouraging tourism and protecting cultural and natural heritage at participating sites. This project is also a pilot project that will demonstrate how to integrate tourism development with heritage protection, a process which can then be duplicated in other provinces of China with similar conditions. This overall objective will address the following issues:

    1) Social aims: to promote the development of the local community and traditional culture by encouraging locals to participate in the project.

    2) Minority development aim: to improve the living conditions and preserve the culture of minority groups.

    3) Tourism aim: to set up a sustainable development model for tourism development and cultural heritage protection.

    4) Economic aim: to help implement poverty reduction strategy. 5) Intangible cultural heritage protection: to save and protect traditional intangible

    cultural heritage through a joint effort with local communities. Overview of the Project This project consists of 4 components: cultural heritage protection in minority villages and ancient towns; natural heritage protection and utilization; tourism service facilities in gateway cities; and technical assistance. Minority Cultural Heritage Protection in Villages The project includes 12 sub-projects and involves 17 villages distributed across 9 counties in Anshun city, Qiandongnan prefecture, and Qianxinan prefecture. The project components include:

    z Construction of infrastructure in the villages, such as pathways, fire-fighting facilities, sewage treatment plants, garbage collection methods, and sanitation facilities

    z Repair and maintenance of ancient public buildings z Repair of old residential houses and renovation of other homes that will be used for

    display purposes; construction of a village cultural exhibition center and a tourist center z Construction of signs and rest facilities z Support for intangible heritage protection z Small loans to guesthouses and family workshops in the villages

    Ancient Town Protection There are 4 sub-projects focusing on ancient towns: (1) the Jiuzhou Ancient Town in Anshun City, an example of Chinese fortress culture, (2) the Jiuzhou Ancient Town in Huangping County, an example of cultural integration between the Miao ethnic minority and the Han majority, (3) the Shidong Ancient Town, an example of traditional silver jewelry and pottery culture, and (4) the Longli Ancient Town, another example of Han fortress culture. These ancient towns are distributed across 4 counties of Anshun city and Qiandongnan prefecture. The project components include:

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    z Construction of infrastructure in communities z Repair of historic public buildings z Renovation of old residential houses z Construction of new cultural exhibition center, folk museum, and tourist center, as well as

    construction of signs and tourism service facilities z Intangible cultural heritage protection and training of local people

    Natural Heritage Protection and Utilization There are 4 sub-projects involving a total of 2 national geologic parks and 2 national scenic areas: Guanling National Geo-park, Xingyi National Geo-park, Wanfenglin National Scenic Area, and Shamuhe National Scenic Area. These sub-projects are distributed across 4 counties of Anshun city, Qiandongnan prefecture, and Qianxinan prefecture. The project components include:

    z Construction of infrastructure, such as pathways and sewage treatment facilities z Improvement and extension of exhibition spaces, as well as facilities for information,

    security, and first-aid. z Improvement of tourism service facilities z Intangible cultural heritage protection and training of local people z Development of minority villages and communities.

    Heritage Protection and Tourism Service Facilities Construction in Gateway Cities There are 5 sub-projects, including:

    z heritage protection and tourism research center in Guiyang city (including tourist information center)

    - heritage protection and tourism research center - folk handicraft research and training center - a comprehensive website covering all of the tourism sites in Guizhou.

    z ethnic minority historic and cultural museums in Kaili county of Qiandongnan prefecture

    - the minority historic and cultural museum of Kaili county will centralize and display the cultural and natural heritage of Qiandongnan prefecture; it will also promote the research of heritage protection and development.

    z tourist information centers in the important ethnic minority autonomous towns in Liping

    county, Jianhe county, and Leishan county. - the tourist information centers in Guiyang and the other 3 counties can provide

    integrated tourism information which can help the tourists comprehend the meaning and importance of local heritage; this will ultimately benefit the local minority population.

    Technical Assistance This includes:

    z capacity building for project management and supervision z assist the communities in the implementation of this project z help to establish guidelines for historic building maintenance and repair z help prepare manuals for heritage protection

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    z training and study z help compile the Guizhou Tourism Master Plan.

    Description of Project Location and Investment This proposed project is to be built in Guiyang city, Anshun city, Qiandongnan prefecture and Qianxinan prefecture. All of the components are located within 4 of the 5 Integrated Clusters specified in the Guizhou Tourism Development Master Plan as discussed in Section 4.1.1. The construction locations are shown in the figures from 3.3-1 to 3.3-5. Details of the components are given in Table 3.3-1 below.

    City Name of Components

    Construction Sites Construction description

    Tianlong fortress cultural heritage protection

    Tiantaishan Tianlong fortress of Tianlong town, Pinba county

    Pathway, drainage system, garbage collection and transfer station, power facility, traditional house maintenance and protection, demonstration model house construction, tourist information center, fortress culture exhibition hall, intangible culture heritage protection and training.

    Jiuzhou fortress cultural heritage protection

    Yunshan village, Benzai village and Jiuxi village of Qiyanqiao town, Xixiu district

    Pathway, car park, fire fighting system, drainage pipe, garbage collection and transfer station, public toilet, river improvement, public signs, traditional house maintenance and protection, demonstration model house construction, museum, tourist information center, ancient building repair, intangible culture heritage protection and training.

    Anshun city

    Guanling national geological park heritage protection

    Tanshan of Xinpu village, Guanling county 1

    Ancient site exhibition facilities, archaeological site exhibition, Triassic ichthyosaur exhibition hall, rock and green area of Triassic park, scientific work station, tourist information center, public signs, exhibition pathway, car park, garbage collection system, public toilet, training and education.

    Biasha village cultural heritage protection

    Biasha village, Congjiang county

    Pathway, car park, sewage treatment station, drainage system, fire fighting facility, garbage collection system, protection and repair of Lusheng grounds, planting trees, power supply alteration, traditional Miao house protection

    Duliujiang Dong cultural heritage protection

    Zenchong village and Xiaohuang village, Congjiang county

    Pathway, car park, water supply facility, drainage system, sewage treatment station, fire fighting facility, water environment improvement, garbage collection and transfer system, public toilet, planting trees, traditional Dong house protection, Xiaohuang traditional culture exhibition center, public signs, intangible culture protection.

    Qiandongnan prefecture

    Danzai Miao cultural heritage protection

    Shiqiao village, Danzai county

    Pathway, car park, water supply facility, drainage system, fire fighting facility, garbage collection system, public toilet, water environment improvement, village environment improvement, paper manufacture workshop protection, family paper workshop protection, traditional hotel construction, ancient village gate repair, public signs, tourist information and service center.

    1 The facilities are located within the central development zone of the Geopark, see Section 4.4.3

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    City Name of Components

    Construction Sites Construction description

    Jiuzhou ancient city heritage protection

    Jiuzhou town, Huangping county

    Ancient street renovation, drainage system, sewage treatment facility, garbage collection and transfer system, ancient building maintenance, fire fighting facility, public signs, intangible cultural heritage protection and training.

    Yangasha national cultural region heritage protection

    Wubao village, Balang village and Wenquan village of Guanme town, Raohao village of Nanzai town, Liuji village of Nanjia town, Jianhe county

    Pathway, car park, water supply and drainage system, weather bridge, sewage treatment facility, fire fighting facility, garbage collection system, public toilet, traditional houses and village gate repair, village environment improvement, planting trees, stannous embroidery exhibition center.

    Longli ancient city heritage protection

    Longli ancient city of Longli town, Jinping county

    Pathway, drainage system, sewage treatment facility, fire fighting facility, traditional house repair, water environment improvement, village environment improvement, public signs, tourist information and service center, intangible cultural heritage protection.

    Bala river Miao cultural heritage protection in Kaili region

    Jidao, Huaienbao, Longjing of Kaili city

    Pathway, car park, weather bridge, water supply and drainage system, sewage treatment facility, fire fighting facility, garbage collection system, public toilet, power supply alteration, traditional house and ancient building repair, minority culture and tourist information center, tourism service facility.

    Bala river Miao cultural heritage protection in Kaili region in Leishan region

    Langdeshangzai, maomaohe, nanmeng, jiaomeng of Leishang county

    Pathway, car park, fire fighting facility, garbage collection system, public toilet.

    Xijiang Miao cultural heritage protection

    Xijiang town, Leishan county

    Pathway, car park, drainage system, sewage treatment facility, fire fighting facility, garbage collection and transfer system, public toilet, traditional house repair, tourist information center, village gate, landscape platform, folk performance grounds, Timbal and Lusheng grounds, intangible cultural heritage protection.

    Zhaoxing Dong cultural heritage protection

    Zhaoxing, Tang’an, jitang, xiage of Zhaoxing town, Liping county

    Street, pathway, riverbank, water supply and drainage system, sewage treatment facility, fire fighting facility, garbage collection system, first-aid station, traditional house repair, demonstration model house construction.

    Shanmu river cultural and natural heritage protection

    Shibing county

    Road, pathway, car park, bridge, port, water supply and drainage system, sewage treatment facility, garbage collection and transfer system, public toilet, video monitoring system, first-aid facility, public signs, management office building.

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    City Name of Components

    Construction Sites Construction description

    Shidong cultural heritage protection

    Shidong town, Taijiang county

    Pathway, car park, water supply and drainage system, sewage treatment facility, garbage collection and transfer system, public toilet, traditional house and ancient building repair, minority craft exhibition hall, information center, public signs, river bank protection, intangible cultural heritage protection.

    Sanmentang cultural heritage protection

    Sanmentang village, Tianzhu county

    Pathway, water supply and drainage system, sewage treatment facility, garbage collection and transfer system, traditional house and ancient building repair, ancient steel and port protection, tourist information center, management office building, folk culture and performance grounds, intangible cultural heritage protection.

    Ethnic minorities culture and history museum

    Kaili county Minority culture museum, car park, landscape improvement

    Liping tourism information center

    Liping county Tourist information center

    Jianhe tourism information center

    Jianhe county

    Tourist information center, car park, water supply and drainage system, garbage collection and transfer station, public toilet, planting trees, intangible cultural heritage protection.

    Xingyi national geo park and Dingxiao Guizhou dragon heritage protection

    Dingxiao development area of Xingyi county2

    Fossil museum and square, training items.

    Maling river canyon and Wanfeng lake national scenic spot cultural and natural heritage protection

    Xingyi county

    Pathway, gate, bridge, car park, river bank, water supply and drainage system, sewage treatment facility, public toilet, garbage collection and transfer system, traditional house repair, ancient tree protection, village environment improvement, performance grounds, Buyi culture center, tourism service center, intangible cultural heritage protection and training.

    Qianxinan prefecture

    Buyi cultural and natural heritage protection

    Zhenfeng county

    Pathway, water supply and drainage system, sewage treatment facility, planting trees, dancing grounds, traditional house repair, demonstration model house construction, Buyi culture center, intangible cultural heritage protection and training.

    2The museum is in the centeral development zone of the Geo-park, see Section 4.3.3.

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    City Name of Components

    Construction Sites Construction description

    Guizhou cultural and natural protection development center

    Guizhou Normal University

    Guizhou cultural and natural heritage protection and development center

    Guiyang city

    Guizhou tourism capability development

    Guizhou Tourism Agency

    Capacity building

    Figure 3.3-1 The Prefectures Boundary Map of Guizhou Figure 3.3-2 Structure Plan Map of Anshun Integrated Tourism Area Figure3.3-3 Structure Plan Map of Kaili-Zhenyuan Integrated Tourism Area Figure 3.3-4 Structure Plan Map of Liping-Congjiang-Rongjiang Integrated Tourism Area Figure 3.3-5 Structure Plan Map of Xingyi-Anlong Integrated Tourism Area

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    Description of Facilities The summary information of the components’ locations, scales and contents are listed in Table 3.3-2 and Annexed Table 1.

    Table 3.3-2 Typical Construction Contents

    Facility Quantity Scale General information Number of involved

    component sites Garbage collection stations

    16 The area of each station is 100m2

    The transport capability is 10t/d 9

    Public toilets

    55 The area of each toilet varies from 60m2 to 450m2

    Most toilets have a capacity of 12 persons, while some small toilets have a capacity of 5 persons.

    20

    Sewage treatment facilities

    23

    The treatment capability of each station varies from 50m3/d to 5000m3/d

    The sewage will be disposed by integrated treatment facilities using technology for sedimentation, biological and chemical reactions.

    20

    Museum 3

    The area of each museum varies from 2000m2 to 10000m2

    For the exhibition of fossils, folk culture, local culture and handicrafts.

    3

    Tourist information center

    10 The area of each center varies from 250m2 to 1000m2

    For training, exhibition and resting.

    10

    Parking lot 20

    The area of each car park varies from 500m2 to 5000m2

    The locations of the car parks must conform to local plans. Most of the car parks are new construction, except the one in Xifenglin scenic area, which is an extension.

    19

    Riverbed clean

    7The maximum length of the river is 4.7km

    Make pathways along the bank, clean riverbed, preserve landscape, illuminate at night

    7

    Generic Design The environmental facilities to be built in the component sites take a generic design approach that follows the criteria below:

    z Have adapted to local conditions z Have been proven in operation z Represent the least cost option z Comply with environmental standards

    A. Solid Waste Collection and Transfer Facility

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    The municipal solid waste will be collected from garbage bins placed at tourism facilities and areas. The local environmental sanitation team will be responsible for collecting the solid waste from the bins and moving it to the transferring stations (which will be constructed during the project) on a regular basis. The collection station consists of concrete tanks lined with cement and a loading area for truck access, which will provide the space for large vehicles to begin hauling solid waste to the county landfill facility. The size of the tanks is designed based on the expected quantity of visitors.

    B. Public Toilets

    Water-flushing toilets will be used. These comprise a water storage system and septic tanks. The waste collected in the septic tanks is generally collected either by the local sanitation team or by farmers, who use them for compost and (subsequently) for agricultural applications.

    C. Sewage Collection and Treatment Facility Domestic wastewater will be collected at the wastewater treatment station via open ditches. As in the rural regions of the project area, industrial wastewater flow is virtually negligible, since the wastewater is low in COD but high in NH3-N. Thus, there is no concern over industrial hazardous constituents in the water flow; a simple land treatment system is used to treat the wastewater to maintain standards. Each wastewater treatment station consists of the primary treatment units and an overflow system, but not followed on by disinfection units. The wastewater is initially settled in a retarding pond to reduce the load of SS, and then it is introduced to a vegetated land and is allowed to flow very slowly down the vegetated slope and collected in a ditch. Retention time of the wastewater generation is from 10 days to 15 days. To eliminate nitrogen from the flow, the vegetation will be harvested each year.

    D. Parking lot

    Car parking lots will be provided in the peripheral area of each component site. As the project is largely on a karst landform (which is low in ecological vulnerability but still sensitive to land disturbance), the car parking yards are paved with porous materials that allow for vegetative establishment, rather than the asphalt that is used in conventional parking lots. Landscape and visual considerations have been factored into the design of the car parks; open spaces nearby are preserved for planting trees.

    E. Riverbed cleaning The improvement of the river (which runs 4.8 km) includes sediment dredging, embankment by stones and rocks, pedestrian pathways, and lights.

    Typical and Special Works Although the works under the project vary in size and location, they can be classified into several groups; an example from each group is summarized below. A. Solid Waste Collection Station

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    One of the examples for solid waste collection stations is to be constructed under the Tianlong Fortress component. This component is located in the scenic area of Tianlong fortress. There are 2548 local residents and each one will produce 1.2kg garbage per day. The tourists are projected to reach 3000 people/day in the area and each one will produce 0.5kg solid waste per day. The total amount of solid waste generated per day will be 4t. About 80 garbage bins will be distributed around the village, and they will take up a total area of 80 m2. Two solid waste transfer stations will be constructed adjacent to the main entrances of Tianlong Fortress Scenic Area; each station will have an area of 100m2. The stations will collect 40m3 of garbage in the scenic area in their service area of 3 km2. The architectural design of the two stations has taken into account the surrounding environment and the traditional style of other buildings. Figure 3.3-6 below shows the layout and image of the transfer station.

    Figure 3.3-6 Solid Waste Collection Station B. Public Toilet

    One of the examples for public toilet construction is in Nachan village. The design of public toilets follows the Urban Public Toilet Planning and Design Standards. The construction of the toilets will use local materials and remain consistent with the local architectural style. The newly constructed public toilets will meet the increased demand of the whole scenic area. The toilets will be managed by the local government. The toilets are located on nationally-owned or collectively-owned unused land and do not involve resettlement or building demolishment. Figure 3.3-7 shows the layout and image of these public toilets.

    Figure 3.3-7 Public Toilets C. Sewage Treatment Station

    One of the examples for sewage treatment stations is in the Wanfenglin National Scenic Area. The capacity of the treatment station is based on the water demand projection and the conversion ratio into wastewater. Table 3.3-3 summarizes the design criteria for the wastewater treatment station.

    Table 3.3-3 Parameters for Wastewater Treatment Station

    Maximal water supply(t/d)

    Daily variation coefficient

    Average water supply(t/d)

    Sewage conversion coefficient

    Average sewage discharge (t/d)

    Required Treatment capability

    (t/d)

    782 1.3 601 80% 480 500

    The sewage treatment station will be located downstream along the river and on the leeward side of the residential area. The location features desirable geological conditions, flood protection, convenience of sewage collection/conveyance/discharge, as well as good water and electricity supply. There will be an adequate area for an extension of the station in the future.

    D. Museum

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    One of the examples for museums is the Guizhou Dragon Fossil Museum in Xingyi National Geo-Park. The design of the museum follows the General Specifications of Civil Structure Design, Office Structure Design Specifications, Museum Design Specifications, Cultural Center Design Specifications, Village Structure Fire Protection Design Specifications, Urban Road and Structure Barrier-free Design Specifications, Public Structure Energy-saving Design Standards, and so on. The main function of museums is to promote scientific awareness. This is a newly constructed middle-size museum. The museum is a 2 floor structure with a height of 12m and a floor area of 4,100m2. The planting and paving area is 1,500m2. The architecture is consistent with the local style. This museum will be located on nationally-owned unused land, and does not require resettlement of people. Picture 3.3-8 shows the image and layout of the museum.

    Figure 3.3-8 Guizhou Dragon Fossil Museum E. Tourist information Centers

    One of the examples for tourist information centers is the information center in the Wanfenglin National Scenic Area. The main functions of tourist information centers are tourism consultation, food services, conferences, resting areas, shopping and entertainment.. The design follows the General Clauses of Civil Structure Design, Office Structure Design Specifications, Hotel Design Specifications, Shop Design Specifications, Intelligent Structure Design Specifications, Structure Fire Protection Design Specifications, Urban Road and Structure Barrier-free Design Specifications, Public Structure Energy-saving Design Standards, and so on. The construction of the tourist information centers will use local materials and remain consistent with the local architectural style. The newly constructed tourist information centers can meet the service requirement for the whole scenic area. The center will be located on nationally-owned or collectively-owned unused land and does not involve relocation of people or building demolition. Figure 3.3-9 shows the layout and image of the museum.

    Figure 3.3-9 Wanfenglin Tourist Information Center F. Parking Lot

    One of the examples for parking lots is in the Guanling National Geo-Park. The design of parking lot follows the Garage and Car Park Fire Protection Design Specifications with local ecological and landscape style. The ground is paved with porous materials and the area nearby is planted with flowers and trees. The car parks will be located on nationally-owned or collective-owned unused land and do not involve relocation of people or building demolition. The parking lot is located at the entrance of the Guanlin Fossil National Geologic Park; it features facilities for gasoline-powered cars and for the battery-powered cars used in the park

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    itself. The area of the car park is 5000m2. Figure 3.3-9 shows the layout and image of the parking lot.

    Figure 3.3-9 Parking Lot for the Guanling National Geo-Park. G. River cleaning

    One of the examples for river cleaning programs is the component of Nahui River pathway construction and river bank regulation. The river cleaning program here will pave the river banks with a soft impermeable layer and also encourage vegetation. Figure 3.3-10 shows the design layout of the cleaning works.

    Figure3.3-10 Nahui River Cleaning Works H. Traditional House Repair

    Two of the examples for Traditional House Repair are at Tianlong Fortress and Jiuzhou Fortress components. The repair of traditional houses follows the General Specifications of Civil Structure Design, Structure Fire Protection Design Specifications, Urban Road and Structure Barrier-free Design Specifications, Public Structure Energy-saving Design Standards, House Design Specifications and the local traditional architecture style.

    These kinds of repairs target traditional houses and public buildings that are highlighted in the conservation plan approved by the relevant cultural heritage agencies. Figure 3.3-11 and 3.3-12 shows the image of the traditional house before repair and after repair respectively.

    Figure 3.3-11 Traditional House Repair in Tianlong Fortress Figure 3.3-12 Traditional House Repair in Jiuzhou Fortress

    I. Water Supply One of the examples for water supply facility is at Jiuzhou fortress. The design of the water supply facilities follows the Outdoor Drainage Design Specification, Construction and Acceptance Specification of Water Supply and Drainage Pipeline, Water Quality Standards of Sewage Discharged into the City Sewer, etc. The layout of pipelines is designed based on technical and financial analysis. The specific criteria for pipeline designs are:

    z The pipeline system should be designed to match the drainage capability in the long run, since each associated facility will be completed step by step.

    z Make full use of the existing drainage systems along the roads and rivers. z The layout of pipeline should be adapted to the landscape. z The pipeline should be as straight as possible and deeply buried. z The above construction principles take the regional environment into consideration and will

    minimize the environmental impacts of the sub-project items. Figure 3.3-13 shows the layout of water supply and drainage pipelines

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    Figure 3.3-14 shows the layout of water supply and drainage pipelines at Jiuzhou Fortress Construction Period The construction period will be 4 years from September 2008 to September 2012.

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    Policy and Legal Framework

    This chapter presents an overview of the policies relevant to the provincial tourism development of Guizhou and the legal context at various levels for this project. Policy Framework During this EIA, the following set of documents were reviewed to understand the policy context under which this project was developed:

    i. Guizhou Provincial Tourism Development Master Plan, World Tourism Organization, China National Tourism Administration and Guizhou Provincial Tourism Administration, 2002;

    ii. Guizhou Rural Tourism Development Plan, Guizhou Provincial Research and Communication Center for Cultural Tourism, 2006; and

    iii. Guizhou Eleventh Five-Year Socio-economic Plan

    Overview of Guizhou Provincial Tourism Development Master Plan The Master Plan was prepared by a joint team of international and national consultants under the guidance of the China National Tourism Administration and the Guizhou Tourism Administration, with technical and financial assistance from the World Tourism Organization and the World Bank. After the MP was approved by the China National Tourism Administration in 2003, the Master Plan was adopted as the official guideline for tourism development in Guizhou. The principal objective of the Master Plan is to maximize the benefit of tourism as a sector of the economy as quickly as possible while providing sufficient protection to environmental and cultural heritage. The Master Plan sets out appropriate strategies for tourism development based on an analysis of the province’s tourism assets and the condition of associated facilities. The Master Plan emphasizes Guizhou’s ethnic minority culture and its unique natural environment. Six integrated clusters and six feature clusters focusing on Environmental Tourism, Cultural Tourism, Rural Tourism, and developments were proposed as the key products for both international and domestic markets. Rural tourism focuses on ethnic minority culture, whereas eco-tourism includes the landscapes, flora, and fauna.

    The integrated clusters are as follows: z Cluster A: Guiyang z Cluster B: Anshun z Cluster C: Kaili-Zhenyuan z Cluster D: Liping-Congjiang-Rongjiang z Cluster E: Libo z Cluster F: Xingyi-Anlong

    Relation with the Master Plan

    The project components are well-selected to fit with the context of these integrated clusters, since they are part of four clusters: Anshun, Kaili-Zhenyuan, Liping-Congjiang-Rongjiang, and Xingyi-Anlong. The relationship of the components with the integrated clusters is given in Table 4.1-1 below.

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    Table 4.1-1 Relation between the Project and the Clusters Cluster B: Anshun Cluster C: Kaili-

    Zhenyuan Cluster D: Liping-Congjiang-Rongjiang

    Cluster F: Xingyi-Anlong

    Tianlong fortress cultural heritage protection

    Jiuzhou Biasha Nachan

    Jiuzhou fortress cultural heritage protection

    Shiqiao Duliu River Dong Ethnic Cultural Heritage Protection

    Xingyi National Geo-Park

    Guanling National Geo-Park heritage protection

    Bala river (Kaili) Yang A’Sha Miao Wangfenglin

    Bala river (Leishan) LongLi Ancient Town Xijiang Zhaoxing Sanmu river Shidong

    Sanmentang

    The Master Plan also sets out principles to be followed in the development of tourism resources that give priority to environmental and heritage protection. These principles are comprehensive and thus became the guideline for designing tourism markets in Guizhou. They are: z Use of local, traditional construction materials that maintain the traditional architectural style z Control of tourism development resources so as to avoid over-exploitation and over-

    development in a given area z Control of tourist flow based on environmental carrying capacity assessment z Participation of local communities in the processes of planning, development and

    management of these schemes z Control of tourist behavior to prevent negligent abuse of tourist areas

    The Master Plan defines three broad types of tourism for the province: Nature-based Tourism, Heritage-based Tourism and Rural Tourism. A number of tourism activities are proposed for each broad category and are summarized below: z Nature-based Tourism:

    1) Hiking within scenic sites and natural reserves 2) Sightseeing 3) Rafting and boating

    z Heritage-based Tourism: 1) Sightseeing (ethnic minority architecture, ancient towns and monuments) 2) Performances (dance, music, traditional lifestyles) 3) Handicraft sales (costumes, fabrics, silver, etc.) 4) Traditional guesthouse accommodation and ethnic cuisine

    z Rural Tourism: 1) Horse riding 2) Demonstration of farmhouse operations (including traditional farming practices and

    livestock breeding) 3) A combination of other nature and heritage-based activities described above

    The above safeguard measures and the preferable category of activities are intended as criteria for the selection, identification and design of development schemes; this ensures that the objective of

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    the Master Plan can be reached. Both the feasibility study and the EIA project development followed the above criteria during the design stage. Guizhou Rural Tourism Development Plan 2006 The Guizhou Provincial Government has realized the significant disparity between urban and rural areas in Guizhou. In 2003, the annual disposable income (per-capita) of the rural population was only 24% that of urban residents. The poverty reduction policy in Guizhou thus highlights the need to create employment opportunities and to increase the income of the rural population through a series of plans. One such plan is the 2006 Guizhou Rural Tourism Development Plan which promotes rural tourism development and ensures equitable spread of income in rural communities. In June 2006, The China National Tourism Administration approved the Guizhou Provincial Rural Tourism Development Plan. The purpose of this plan is to provide strategic guidance for the development of Guizhou’s rural tourism sector, with special emphasis on ethnic and cultural tourism. The Rural Tourism Development Plan identifies some 160 rural villages to be developed for rural tourism. The types of activities to be promoted largely reflect those contained in the Master Plan, and there is once again a focus on ethnic minority attractions. In conjunction with the poverty reduction effort, the data of the State Department Poverty Alleviation Office indicates that 50 counties in Guizhou are included in the 592 poorest counties in China which are in need of focused poverty alleviation assistance. This project involves 13 of these counties: Leishan, Congjiang, Huangping, Jianhe, Rongjiang, Zhenfeng, Liping, Danzhai, Guanling, Taijiang, Jinping, Tianzhu, Shibing. The Rural Tourism Development Plan proposes a model for the establishment of cultural and eco-museums at a number of pilot villages. Under this model, local communities would become shareholders in the tourism development companies and would receive a share of the economic benefits from these enterprises. Guizhou Eleventh Five Year Socio-economic Plan The Guizhou Eleventh Five-Year Socio-Economic Plan set new targets for the period of 2006-2011, as well as strategies to achieve these goals. The plan aims for a 25% annual increase in tourism revenue through the following proposed strategies: z Enhance infrastructure construction, specifically modern transportation infrastructure and

    information systems z Accelerate service industry growth (which is led by the tourism sector) by guiding tourism

    growth and by improving overall quality through the following actions: - Promote tourist attractions in Anshun, Libo and Liping-Congjiang-Rongjiang areas - Expand and diversify tourism beyond mere sightseeing tourism to include eco-tourism,

    ethnic minority tourism and leisure tourism - Use Guizhou’s tourism assets (ethnic minorities, karst landforms, and pristine natural

    environment) in a better and more sustainable fashion. - Comprehensively improve tourism infrastructure and facilities, including transport,

    accommodation, food services, shopping, and amenities. Continue implementing a good system for tourism management information, and introduce a special tender system for scenic sites (where needed).

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    Other Relevant Documents A. Master Plan for Each Component Area

    Each component area has developed a master plan that matches the Master Plan at provincial level. These more detailed plans cover the same information as the Master Plan, ranging from analysis of local conditions to the institutional arrangements for implementing development and environmental protection.

    B. Strategic EA Study

    To improve the sustainability of Guizhou’s tourism sector, the ERM undertook a Strategic EA (SEA) for the tourism sector in March 2007. The SEA assessed environmental and socio-economic impacts of tourism development, and subsequently improved the design and implementation of policies, plans, and programs. From the strategic and planning level, the SEA revealed a number of potential impacts on the natural environment and cultural heritage; it then made recommendations for the development of the tourism sector. During the preparation of this project’s EIA, the concerns in the SEA were addressed.

    Legal Framework Cultural Heritage Protection The legal framework for the protection and management of cultural resources in China is strong. The Cultural Heritage Protection Law of the People’s Republic of China (1982), the Law of Cultural Relic Protection (2002) and associated regulations provide the legal basis for protection of cultural relics in China. The PRC Law of Cultural Relic Protection was issued in October 2002. It stipulates that construction and tourism development should comply with the policies of cultural relic protection. Damage to cultural relics caused by these activities is prohibited. The building of facilities that pollute cultural relics and their environment, and any other activities which may affect the safety and environment of cultural relics, are prohibited in ‘construction control zones’ or the ‘cultural relic protection unit.’ Any construction projects within the ‘construction control zone’ that threaten the historical environment are prohibited. The law also stipulates that existing facilities which have caused pollution to the cultural relic and its environment should be prosecuted. Regulations of Cultural Protection in Guizhou Province were passed through the provincial congress on September 23, 2005 and became effective on November 1, 2005. These regulations stipulate that repair of intangible cultural assets should be subject to the provincial cultural administration, which will perform a review and approval of the conservation plan. The regulations also require that, prior to construction of large physical projects, archaeological investigation will be carried out under the coordination of the provincial cultural administration. In 1985, the National People’s Congress ratified the UNESCO Convention Concerning the Protection of the World’s Cultural and Natural Heritage (The World Heritage Convention), thereby integrated international practices into Chinese regulation.

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    In relation to intangible heritage, in August 2004, China officially joined the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage and there is a draft of Law of the People’s Republic of China on the Protection of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

    In 2000, the Principles of Conservation of Heritage Site in China (The Chinese Principles) were developed through a joint effort of China’s ICOMOS and the State Administration of Cultural Heritage. The Chinese Principles are professional guidelines for conservation practices within the existing legislative framework. Presently, there are no specific laws concerning tourism development in China, although the need for such a law has become evident due to the rapid development of China’s tourism industry over the last decade. A series of technical standards have been developed in recent years to provide technical guidance on tourism planning and facility development. For example, Measures for the Administration of Assessment and Appraisal of the Grades of Tour Guides and the Decision of China National Tourism Administration on Amending the Implementation Measures for the Administration of Tour Guides were approved. The Chinese Government issued a notice on Strengthening the Protection of Cultural Heritages on Dec. 22, 2005 which highlights the need for maintenance of physical cultural heritage and the protection of national historical and cultural towns. Conservation of cultural heritage must be incorporated into the regional plans for rural and urban development. In addition, this official notice calls for the establishment of a qualification procedure for the professional teams for construction and repair, and the establishment of comprehensive technical specifications and standards for maintenance works. A. Technical Standards for Cultural Heritage Repair and Maintenance

    The PRC Law of Cultural Relic Protection has included the requirements for establishing technical standards for repair work and maintenance work on cultural heritage. In the past decade, about 20 sets of standards were issued, including the Technical Specifications for Maintenance and Reinforcement of Ancient Wooden Structures, Color Codes for Chinese Ancient Structures, and Design Specifications for Museums. However, given the diversified nature of cultural heritage, there are still many gaps in the standards for a variety of heritage types, such as stonework and silk textiles. Although a conservative approach is generally applied in the repair and maintenance of heritage, presence of new chemical materials offers an opportunity (and a threat) for these conservation projects. The Administration of Cultural Heritage has set up an expert committee to standardize the system.

    B. Zoning Requirements for Cultural Protection Unit

    Physical cultural heritage sites are preserved through the land use planning measures, which often classify the area surrounding and within the heritage site into a Core Protection Zone and a Construction Control Zone.

    z The Core Protection Zone protects the integrity of the heritage itself, i.e. the part with

    intrinsic cultural value. It also protects the area or facilities where more stringent management measures and repair standards are applied

    z The Construction Control Zone buffers the core protection zone from any impacts on the landscape as a result of new constructions.

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    The management team of the historic and cultural towns is responsible for developing its own conservation plan for the cultural assets within its jurisdiction and is also responsible for supervising the implementation of that plan.

    Environmental Assessment The current technical guidelines for environmental assessment in China covers a wide range of impacts potentially resulting from construction activities and operation of facilities. However the guidelines and EA procedure has not set out any specific requirement for assessment of landscape and visual impact that would occur in scenic areas and geo-parks. Given the nature of geo-parks, where natural landscape is an cornerstone of the location, any visual impacts must be noted in the planning stage of the construction project, to ensure the integrity of the park. The State Environmental Protection Law empowers provincial EPBs to issue such administrative procedures for the implementation of EIA within their jurisdiction. Geological Relics Protection The protection of geological relics has been ignored until recently (the past two decades) in China. With the passage of the Regulations on Establishment of Geological Natural Reserve in 1987, the protection of geological relics has been implemented within a legal context. An important official document, titled Geological Relics Protection Administration Regulation, was issued in 1995, which highlights the establishment of geo-parks to preserve geological relics; it also gives the institutional arrangements to administrate and regulate these areas, as well as the general principle for “active protection with rational development.” The general principle refers to a balance between a national need to preserve geological relics and a local interest in earning economic benefits from developing those relics. The Ministry of Land Resources is empowered, with the assistance of the State Environmental Protection Bureau, to administrate the protection of geological relics in China. Meanwhile, the provincial administrations of land resources are empowered, with the assistance of the provincial environmental bureau, to manage the geological relics within their jurisdiction. Since 2000, a series of attempts were made by the Ministry of Land Resources to establish national geo-parks in China. The application procedures, appraisal experts panel, appraisal standards and the guidelines for a National Geo-Park Master Plan (pilot draft) have been developed and issued since then. Presently, a total of 85 national geo-parks have been appraised and approved across China; 33 of those have been established. To guide the establishment and management of national geo-parks, the Ministry of Land Resources has developed the Master Plan for Geological Relics Protection in China for 2001-2010. The Plan defines the following targets to be achieved at the initial stage (that is, by the end of the first ten-year period after geo-parks became promoted):

    z Curb the trend of uncontrolled development on geo-relics z Effectively protect those high-value geo-relics which represent a particular/unique type z Complete the institutional structure necessary to oversee the protection of geo-relics z Establish geo-parks with a comprehensive set of interesting relics, reasonable locations,

    and appropriate management.

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    A. Zoning Requirement for Geo-Parks

    Currently there are no specific planning requirements for National Geo-Parks that are applicable in China. However, relevant administrations have developed protection plans which contain the functional zones for the Geo-Parks under their jurisdiction. Generally, a typical protection plan for Geo-Parks requires that three basic zones be set up: for fundamental protection, scientific study, and tourism development, respectively.

    1) Guanling National Geo-Park

    The Protection Plan for Guanling National Geo-Park was prepared by Guizhou Provincial Geological Survey Institute and approved by the Guizhou Provincial Land Resource Bureau in 2002. The Plan has two types of function zones: a protection zone and a protective development zone. The protection zone includes core protection a sub-zone and a buffer sub-zone; while the protective development zone includes a central development sub-zone, a backup development sub-zone and a fossil protection sub-zone. Functions of these sub-zones are described in Table 4.1-2 below.

    Table 4.1-2 Summary of the Sub-zones in Guanling Geo-Park

    Sub-zone Function Core protection sub-zone

    This area covers the fossils and geological sites which are of significant scientific and aesthetic value. The fossil groups within this area are under strict protection and are not subject to any discovery plan for any purpose including scientific study. These geological sites are protected from any development.

    Buffer sub-zone This area is zoned for protection of geological sites. This area is also zoned for scientific study with the scientific study plan being subject to approval by park administration. Scientific researchers are not allowed to get into this area before official approval is obtained.

    Central development sub-zone

    This area is the main part of t