Helpful tips to prepare for hurricane season in Texas

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In Texas, the hurricane season started on June 1, and is expected to extend to November 30. So, for Texas electricity consumers, it pays to know about some tips that would help them stay better prepared for the hurricane season.

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  • Helpful tips to prepare for hurricane season in Texas

    In Texas, the hurricane season started on June 1, and is expected to extend to November 30.

    According to the predictions of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the

    2012 hurricane season will have an average of 9 to 15 storms, of which 8 could become

    hurricanes, and a maximum of 3 could turn into major hurricanes. So, for Texas electricity

    consumers, it pays to know about some tips that would help them stay better prepared for

    the hurricane season.

    General Electricity tips

    Steer clear of metal fences as they might get energized by fallen power lines.

    Proceed carefully while clearing or cutting fallen trees, as they may have entangled

    power lines.

    If a broken power line falls on your car, its better to stay inside the vehicle and call

    for help using your cell phone. Since the power line will make your vehicle

    energized, you will be safe inside until help arrives.

    In case you need to move out of the car due to life-threatening hazards or fire, jump

    out of it with both your feet touching the ground together. Try to jump as far as

    possible from the vehicle, and hop away ensuring that both your feet land on the

    ground all at once. Since rings of different voltages are formed by the fallen power

    line, its advisable not to run as your legs, while running, may "bridge" current from

    a higher voltage ring to a lower ring, which in turn could cause a shock. So, hop to

    get away at a safe distance.

  • In case you use a power generator, dont use too many appliances or you may end

    up exceeding the generators recommended wattage. Its also advisable not to

    connect the generator directly to the main fuse box or circuit panel of your home.

    Use properly grounded, heavy duty extension cords for plugging your appliances

    directly to the generator. You should also ensure that the extension cords are not

    worn or frayed.

    Place your generator in a region, which is well-ventilated. Never run it in a stuffy

    place or inside your garage. Remember that generators powered by gasoline

    produce carbon monoxide, and give up fumes that can be lethal.

    Tips for flooded homes

    If your home gets flooded, keep these tips in mind to make sure that you dont compromise

    on electrical safety.

    In case the electrical outlets of your home become submerged, its advisable to call a

    licensed electrician before you try to restore power or turn on the main circuit

    breaker.

    Once your electronic equipment and electrical appliances are submerged in water,

    wait for at least a week to let them get dry thoroughly. Then call a qualified

    repairperson to get them examined before you put them to use. Its better not to try

    repairing a flood-damaged appliance on your own as it could cause an electrical

    shock or even death.

    In case your outdoor AC system has been under water, its controls are likely to have

    water and mud accumulated inside. So, rather than trying to restart it, which could

    cause further damage and need costly repairs, its prudent to get the system checked

    by a competent air conditioning technician before using it.

    Use these tips to stay safe during this hurricane season. Let your neighbors and friends

    know about them too to make them aware of the hazards and ensure their safety.

  • About Shop Cheap Energy - Shop Cheap Energy helps consumers compare and shop

    electricity and gas plans online. To learn more visit at www.ShopCheapEnergy.com

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