ict in preservice teacher education

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ICT in Preservice Teacher Education. Shifting Paradigms ISTEs SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05. Getting Started. Goals: To share knowledge and experience. To improve the ICT education of preservice teachers. To improve the education of PreK-12 students. Dave Moursund. Organized the Workshop. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • ICT in Preservice Teacher Education Shifting Paradigms

    ISTEs SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Getting StartedGoals:To share knowledge and experience.To improve the ICT education of preservice teachers.To improve the education of PreK-12 students.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Dave MoursundOrganized the Workshop.Will present the introduction.Will present a short section on ICT outside the United States.Will present a section on Futures near the end of the Workshop.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Topics & Presenter/FacilitatorsICT assessment of entering preservice teachers. Rachel Vannatta.Traditional" ICT in education courses. Tweed W. Ross.ICT integrated into non-ICT courses. Louanne Smolin.Online, hybrid, and computer-assisted learning. Donna Russell.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • IntroductionsPlease:Tell a little about yourself.Indicate your involvement with the field of computers in teacher education.Say want you want to get out of this workshop.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Some Foundational and Overview Ideas Dave MoursundUniversity of Oregon

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Paradigm Shiftsparadigm (noun)1. a typical example of something2. an example that serves as a pattern or model for something, especially one that forms the basis of a methodology or theory

    Example of a paradigm shift: Shifting from oral tradition to written tradition.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Some Paradigm Shifts in EducationFree, required public education.Technology such as ball point pen.Teaching science and scientific method.United States Public Law 94-142 (1975).Presentation media used in schools.Calculators and computers.Internet and Web.Asynchronous distance learning.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Educational Improvement: Continual Improvement

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Upper Limit TheoryIn the US, scores in the 3 Rs have been stable for about 40 years.Robert Branson (1987 and thereafter) argues we have nearly reached an Upper Limit for teacher centered and teaching centered K-12 education.We need a paradigm shift if we want to break out of this situation.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Educational Improvement: Paradigm Shift

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Some ProposedParadigm ShiftsShift to learner and learning centered.Computer-assisted learning and distance learning routine in instructional delivery.Problem solving and roles of ICT in problem solving at the core of every discipline.Students to assume steadily increasing responsibility for their own education.Project-based and problem-based education.ICT as one of the basics.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Global Communications & Global LibraryMarshall McLuhan (1911-1980); Global Village, approximately 1964. Internet (1969) first four nodes.Web (1990s). Google 8 billion pages.Now: Global Library with Grid Computing; integrated storage, processing, retrieval, and AI.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Thomas L. Friedman:The World in FlatGlobalization 1.0: 1492 to 1800; countries globalizing.Globalization 2.0: 1800 to 2000; companies globalizing.Globalization 3.0: 2000 to ; individual people globalizing.Worldwide competition for jobs

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Pandit (Teacher) Nehru1889-1964Indias first Prime Minister

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Indian Institute of Technology

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Jim ClarkFounder of Silicon Graphics, Netscape, and Healtheon/Web MD Corp.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • A Worldwide Paradigm ShiftContinuing growth in outsourcing of manufacturing to lower cost locations.Worldwide competition for knowledge worker jobs that can be accomplished via telecommunications.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Problem of Information OverloadReframing the problem. We have:Problem and complexity overload.Complexity is steadily growing.Some is artificial, created by ads and the media.Some is real and very important.Not enough information, knowledge, skills, aids, and time to deal with all the problems and complexity we encounter.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • The Problem and Complexity Overload SituationWe have personal physical, mental, and fiscal resources, including our education, knowledge, and skills.There are aids to physical and mental resources that we can learn to directly use by ourselves. Through education and experience we can learn to do lots of things for ourselves.There are aids to physical and mental resources that we contract to be done for us. We need money or other barter resources to pay for these.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • A Race Involving:Totality of human knowledge doubling every 5-10 years or so.ICT systems capabilities doubling every 1.5 to 2 years, but eventually this amazing rate of growth will end.Development of better aids to humans.Improving education of humans.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • Education and Complexity OverloadEducators do not control the rate of growth in totality of human knowledge or the rate of increase in ICT capabilities.Teachers of teachers have considerable influence in the preparation of teachers and their students to learn to make effective use of the available information & other problem-solving aids.

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

  • End of Introduction

    NECC SIGTE Workshop 6/26/05

    7/2/05The notes section of this PowerPoint presentation were added after the workshop. One possible intent is to use them as a starting point in the process of expanding this presentation into a short book or several articles.

    Melissa E. Pierson , President of SIG Teacher Education, provided the encouragement and sense of direction for this workshop. Melissa E. Pierson, Ph.D.Assistant Professor Program Coordinator, Instructional TechnologyUniversity of Houstonmpierson@uh.edu713-743-4961

    This workshop was created over a period of somewhat more than six months. Details of the history are available at http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/dave/SIGTE2005.html. The Shifting Paradigms idea was added about a month before the workshop. It came from my study of Robert Bransons work on Upper Limit theory, and the new book by Thomas Friedman: The World is Flat. We have indeed changed from the situation of importing and exporting physical goods and people, to also having a huge import and export of goods and people (knowledge, skills, services) that can be done electronically. Very low cost, high baud rate telecommunications has really clicked in during the past ten years.This turned out to be a small workshop, with a total of 14 people (including the five presenters) attending. This allowed substantial discussion, Thus, the first goal was easily met. The second and third goals are large, ongoing goals. The ideas of paradigm shift, Upper Limit Theory, and Friedmans Flat World all contributed substantially to the groups thinking about goals 2 and 3.The workshop was designed to have six presenters. One was to present on ICT in Education outside of the US. This presenter was unable to attend. To help compensate for this, I added a short section on ICT outside the US, and ties it in with Friedmans work and with work on distance learning. All of these presenters interacted with me during the early planning work when I was seeking input from as many people as possible, and collecting access to course syllabi. Each did a good presentation and made good contributions to the discussion.This is a good way to start a workshop of up to 20 participants. However, it takes quite a bit of time. We used this approach to also allow the presenters to introduce themselves. This took somewhat over 20 minutes for the 14 of us.The material in this section was written out in some detail and provided as a handout to all participants. The presenters got a version of this handout several weeks in advance of the workshop. A pdf version of the eight page handout is available at http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~moursund/dave/SIGTE2005.html. Note that this handout also contains the references for my entire presentation. This definition is from the dictionary built into Microsoft Word. It is important to note that a paradigm shift can take a very long time, and that not everybody shifts. For example, the shift from hunter-gather to agriculture that began more than 10,000 years ago is still not fully completed. There are still small groups of people in Africa and South America that live in hunter-gather societies. When I was putting this list together, I was rather impressed by the number of items that quickly came to mind. Out educational system has made a number of major adjustments (paradigm shifts) over the years. The 1975 PL 94-142 shows that a top down, legal approach can work. It would be interesting to compare this with the current No Child Left Behind paradigm shift that is being pushed by the current federal government in the US. Branson (1987) is not nearly as well known as he should be. He (and others ) detected a flat lining of national progress in the three Rs going back to about 1965. Now, we have about 40 years of data that suggest that our current paradigm for K-12 education in these areas is near its upper limit. This is a key idea. I think it also holds for the same subjects at freshman level in college. In essence, with the amount of time, effort , and paradigm that the K-12 curriculum and freshman college curriculum devotes to these areas, we have gone about as far as we can do. We are running into upper limits on human learning capabilities under the circumstances currently being applied. The slide given above was added after the workshop. It summarizes some of

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