indonesia: west sumatra 2009-10-09آ  the west sumatra satkorlak (provincial disaster management...

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    Indonesia: West Sumatra earthquakes

    Emergency Appeal n° MDRID004 GLIDE n° TS-2009-000211-IDN

    Operations update No. 1 9 October 2009

    Period covered by this update: 7 October – 8 October 2009 Appeal target: CHF 19,185,775 (USD 18.64 million or EUR 12.69 million) Appeal coverage: 20 per cent; with contributions received to date, in cash and kind, and those in the pipeline, the appeal is currently approximately 77 per cent covered. Appeal history: • An emergency appeal for CHF 19,185,775 (USD18.64 million or EUR 12.69 million) was issued on 7

    October 2009 to support the Indonesia Red Cross (Palang Merah Indonesia/PMI) to assist up to 20,000 families (approximately 100,000 beneficiaries) for six months.

    • A preliminary emergency appeal for CHF 6,842,032 (USD 6.6 million or EUR 4.53 million) was issued on 4 October 2009 to support the Indonesia Red Cross (Palang Merah Indonesia/PMI) to assist up to 5,000 families (approximately 25,000 beneficiaries) for six months.

    • CHF 235,000 (USD 227,106 or EUR 155,302) was allocated from the International Federation’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) on 1 October 2009 to support this operation.

    Summary: The latest figures from the national disaster management agency (BNPB) of the Indonesian government confirmed that the death toll is now 704, with 295 people still missing and 2,090 injured. In terms of damage to houses, the figures are: 102,046 severely damaged; 49,864 moderately damaged; 54,606 slightly damaged. The West Sumatra Satkorlak (provincial disaster management unit) reported at least 1,000 landslide spots in Gunung Tigo highlands, located between Padang Pariaman and Agam districts. Assessments of the affected areas are being carried out. An immediate priority for the next few days is to provide shelter and other relief

    The earthquakes which struck the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia on 30 September 2009, affected up to 770,000 people and destroyed buildings, homes and livelihoods. Palang Merah Indonesia (Indonesia Red Cross) rapidly mobilized volunteers, search and rescue teams and relief items to support affected communities. PMI/ International Federation.

    http://www.glidenumber.net/glide/public/search/details.jsp?glide=18914&record=1&last=156 http://www.ifrc.org/docs/appeals/Active/MDRID004.pdf

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    items as well as potable water to people living in remote kampongs (villages of 10-15 families) without land access, who have received little or no relief aid since the earthquakes struck. To address the increased needs following the upscaling of the preliminary emergency appeal, the capacity of the PMI and the International Federation in terms of staff and volunteers will be further strengthened. Partners which have made contributions to the appeal to date include the American Red Cross, British Red Cross/ British government, Canadian Red Cross/ Canadian government, Hong Kong branch of the Red Cross Society of China, Japanese Red Cross, Monaco Red Cross, Netherlands Red Cross/ Netherlands government, Spanish Red Cross, as well as the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) Fund for International Development. The International Federation, on behalf of PMI, would like to thank all partners for their generous response to this appeal. ;

    The situation Over a 48-hour period, two major earthquakes struck the west coast of the Indonesian island of Sumatra. The first quake, measuring 7.6 on the Richter scale, struck at 17:15 local time on 30 September. It struck at a depth of 71 km off the coast, close to the district of Padang in west Sumatra province. The second quake, measuring 6.8, struck an inland area 225 km southeast of Padang city.

    The latest figures from the national disaster management agency (BNPB) of the Indonesian government confirmed the death toll is now 704, with 295 people still missing and 2,090 injured. In terms of damage to housing, the figures are: 102,046 severely damaged; 49,864 moderately damaged; 54,606 slightly damaged. The majority of affected populations are living near to their damaged houses and there is an urgent need for emergency shelter and non-food-items. The ministry of health earlier estimated that around 3,000 people might still be trapped under collapsed buildings. The government of Indonesia has since announced the end of the search and rescue phase, and work to start clearing the rubble with heavy equipment will begin.

    A major and immediate priority will be the provision of medicines, food, shelter, potable water and other relief items to people living in remote kampongs (villages of 10-15 families) without road access, who have received little or no relief aid since the earthquakes struck. PMI medical and assessment teams reaching remote villages in Padang Pariaman, Padang Alai and Padang Tandikeh using a helicopter, have reported that while the health situation is generally stable, shelter and food access is a growing problem in these areas. Affected villagers also have to walk long distances to get water as the water table in the village wells have become too deep. However, with storm warnings over the next few days by the government and concerns over further landslides, it is expected that distribution efforts to these areas will be hampered. To date, the West Sumatra Satkorlak (provincial disaster management unit) has reported at least 1,000 landslide spots in Gunung Tigo highlands, located between Padang Pariaman and Agam districts. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) confirmed that large scale landslides occurred in at least three locations in Padang Pariaman district, destroying entire villages and agricultural land. An immediate challenge will be to get affected families into temporary shelters as soon as possible as part of the recovery process. Some villagers, unable or frightened to stay in their damaged homes, are living under plastic tarpaulins in front of their houses.

    With the provincial public health care system stretched, mobile clinics have helped to treat the injured people, particularly in the rural areas where access is more difficult. There is high rate of respiratory infections and diarrhoea, in addition to high levels of stress. The World Health Organization reported earlier that tetanus is also a rising problem. However, there are several other organizations on the ground focussed on meeting the needsin this regard.

    With some 40 per cent of the provincial capital's school-age population having resumed classes, the UN education cluster is focusing its efforts on providing temporary learning spaces with the necessary water and sanitation facilities, as well as school kits and recreational materials, funding for psychosocial support and support for teachers. The main priority in the emergency response phase is to ensure access to temporary classes and quality education services. In Padang, up to 70 per cent of water distribution networks are reported to be damaged. Water and sanitation is a priority as the shallow wells in many of the worst-hit villages have been destroyed, making access to clean water difficult. To meet basic drinking water needs, hundreds of thousands of litres per day will need to be

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    processed and stored at sites. Most affected areas have had the power supply restored and communication re- established. The government of Sumatra has now confirmed that the emergency phase will last for a month and the reconstruction and rehabilitation stage is expected to commence in November and will last until March 2010.

    Red Cross and Red Crescent action To date, PMI has deployed 326 volunteers to help in the relief efforts. Currently, the PMI is targeting five districts: Kota Padang, Kota Pariaman, Padang Pariaman district, Pesisir Selatan district and Agam district. The volunteers are supporting a wide range of activities, including loading and unloading work at the airport, assessments, relief distributions, logistics and emergency health and care. An eight-member PMI team comprising experienced volunteers and staff from various PMI branches/chapters throughout the country arrived on 7 October to provide support in logistics, relief distribution, assessments and the operations database. A water and sanitation delegate has joined the relief operation and is now supporting PMI on water and sanitation issues. A human resources delegate from the Federation office in Jakarta has also joined the operations team. The relief operation will be scaled up in the coming days as more cargo flights arrive in Padang and a clearer picture of the situation appears through more comprehensive assessments. A USAID flight is due to arrive on 9 October in Padang with 45 tonnes of cargo. The PMI is currently distributing whatever relief stocks they have in Padang and family kits donated by AusAID. In addition, the International Federation’s regional logistics unit in Kuala Lumpur are organizing seven flights between 12 to 18 October, each flight carrying 45 tonnes of cargo. The Red Cross Red Crescent Movement is looking at all options for transport, including the last resort use of military helicopters under the umbrella of government approval. The communities in V Koto KP Dalam, V Koto Timur and Sungai Geringging Padang Pariaman who have received little or no relief so far due to their remoteness will be the focus of PMI’s efforts over the next few days. While there are extensive efforts on rapid and aerial grid assessments as well as ongoing medical relief and coordination with the UN, government and other humanitarian providers, the PMI will undertake a more comprehensive asses

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