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Informed Informed Collaborations: Collaborations: Librarians and the High School to College Transition K e n B u r h a n n a . 14 May 2009 . HACC Information Literacy Symposium

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Informed Collaborations:. Librarians and the High School to College Transition. K e n B u r h a n n a . 14 May 2009 . HACC Information Literacy Symposium. Watching the game before Ginger. Watching the game after Ginger. The Boss. Informed Collaborations. Collaboration is key. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Informed Collaborations:Librarians and the High School to College TransitionK e n B u r h a n n a . 14 May 2009 . HACC Information Literacy Symposium

  • Watching the game before Ginger

  • Watching the game after Ginger

  • The Boss

  • Informed CollaborationsCollaboration is key.

    12-13 Transition in Ohio(Macro to Micro View).

    Share experiences, results, insights, challenges and considerations.

  • Why This Work Is ImportantInformation Literacy is critical to success in the 21st century.

    Its a basic human right.

    The art of finding and using information effectively and ethically.

  • Can Information Literacy Save Lives?Girl uses information literacy to save 100 lives!

  • Plus, we know they havent mastered it.A 2006 study done by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) found that high school and college students were deficient in the skills needed to retrieve, analyze and communicate information online. Andrea L. Foster (2006). Students fall short on information literacy, Educational Testing Services study finds. Chronicle of Higher Education, 53(10), A36.

  • Graduation & Retention Rates The need to increase retention and completion rates for students in higher education is a compelling reason for academic librarians to collaborate with their K-12 colleagues in developing information literacy activities across K-20 education.Jo Ann Carr and Ilene F. Rockman (2003).Information-literacy collaboration: A shared responsibility. American Libraries, 34 (8), 52-54.

  • The FutureIts Coming! What Should We Make It? How?Connecting and working with school libraries is critical to the future of librarianship and education.Jim RettigALA president

  • High school seniors or college freshmen?

  • A Vision of Students TodayA Vision of Students Today, a YouTube video directed by digital ethnographer Michael Wesch of Kansas state.

  • Institute for Library and Information Literacy Education (ILILE)www.ilile.orgThree KSU Library programs:

    Informed Transitions (High School Outreach)Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (TRAILS)Transitioning to College (Web site)

  • Special Task Force on 12-13 Transition in Ohio

  • Special Task Force on 12-13 Transition in OhioK-12 and academic library consortia (INFOhio and OhioLINK).

    White page: Preparing 21st Century Ohio Learners for Success: The Role of Information Literacy and Libraries.

    Six Goals / Action Steps

  • Task Force Action StepsDevelop 21st Century SkillsIncorporate Research ExperiencesDeliver Research ResourcesPrepare Student TeachersPartner with Groups StatewideEnable Collaboration

  • Informed Transitionswww.library.kent.edu/highschool

  • Informed TransitionsHigh school instructional classroom

  • How We Thought It Would WorkOpen invitation (local).2 weeks notice. Prefer groups of 25 or less.Tie-in current assignment. Add-on transition experiences.Borrowing privileges available.Collaborate with librarians and teachers.Help them to collaborate.Will provide assignment, if school doesnt have one.

  • Getting the Program Off the GroundPromotional flyer.

    Mailing to local high schools with follow up call.

    Presentations to local groups and associations.

    Open house.

    Word of mouth.

  • A Typical High School VisitStarts about 9:00 a.m.Begins with a brief library tour.Includes 20 to 30 minutes of library instruction. Rest of visit for student work and point of need instruction.Ends about Noon.

  • Information Literacy InstructionBrief and focused to facilitate the practice of information literacy.

    Broad points Top 10 Things High School Students Should Know About Using College Libraries.

    Tailored to high school assignment.

    Work mainly on topic focus and accessing information.

  • Four Observations that Inform InstructionHigh school students likely will not:

    Have experiences in large libraries.

    Recognize the librarys Web site as a starting place for research.

    Be familiar with the concept of scholarly authority.

    Be familiar with terms like reserves, scholarly journal or periodical.

  • Participation Numbers

  • Visits by School Type

  • Students and Course SubjectsSeniors (60%) and juniors (40%).Mostly advanced-placement, college-bound students.About half are English classes working on literature research.Another quarter are English, Government or Social Studies classes researching topics for argumentative papers.

  • Challenges: AssessmentOne of our seniors from last year stopped in and thanked me for taking her class to the KSU library last year. As a college freshman now, she feels like she knows what to expect and how to get started when she uses the library.Kara Haas, Teacher, Aurora High School

  • Challenges: AssessmentFormative, classroom assessment occurs.Summative assessment is the challenge.Many issues conspire: time, student access, under 18 research subjects, tracking students across multiple institutions.

  • Challenges: Budgetary Constraints As budgets get tighter, fewer students can participate. We need to be creative and flexible: - Distance learning - Grant funding - Collaborative planning consultations

  • Challenges: Group SizeLimited budgets and access to transportation has had two affects:

    Larger group sizes: access to computers, multiple instructors, more students to track.Very small group sizes: devoting time and resources to just a few?

  • Challenges: Borrowing Borrowing is a great option, but can create overhead for planning the visit. At KSU 1,150 high school students have borrowed over 4,300 items. Overdue and replacement rate same as undergraduate population. Teacher borrowing is the most popular option. Many (about half) decide against borrowing.

  • Challenges: Communication Due to our differing work cultures, communication is challenging. More than two collaborators creates additional obstacles. Patience is key.

  • How It Did WorkOpen invitation (local).2 weeks notice. Prefer groups of 25 or less.Tie-in current assignment. Add-on transition experiences.Borrowing privileges available.Collaborate with librarians and teachers.Help them to collaborate.Will provide assignment, if school doesnt have one.

  • Transitioning to College -- T2Cwww.transitioning2college.org

  • Five 3-5 Minute VideosWelcome to Academic LibrariesTalking to DatabasesTips for Research SuccessGetting Help When you Need ItCollege: What to Expect

  • T2C Supporting Materials

  • Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (TRAILS)www.trails-9.org

  • TRAILS UseTRAILS-9 live in January 2006TRAILS-6 live in January 2008Geographic distribution: All 50 states plus the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands; over 30 countriesTo date administered to over 200,000 students

  • Insights & Action PointsWe all have a lot in common.

    Connect thru professional associations.

    Information Literacy standards provide a framework for collaboration.

    Nurture a K-16 / P-20 educational worldview.

  • Insights & Action PointsIdentify and connect with existing programs (duel-credit, bridge programs, Upward Bound).

    Develop list of your information literacy expectations for students (new and graduating).

    Collaborate for Assessment.

    Take a leadership role.

  • Questions

    Shamelessly exploit my daughterI titled my presentation Informed Collaborations because as I reviewed my work with the high school to college transition I was again struck by how every initiative depended on collaboration for its realization and success.

    Im going to move at a fairly quick pace and cover a lot of territory. Ultimately my goal is to get you thinking in practical ways about how you can reach out and collaborate to contribute to student success. Alexandria Proclamation on Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning. I came upon this story when reading about the Alexandria Proclamation. Apparently this story was all the buzz at the conference of the same name held in Alexandria, Egypt in November 2005. 30 participants form 6 countries resolved that.

    Partnership for 21st Century Skills

    My point here is that information literacy is widely to recognized now as a playing a critical role in living in the modern world. Something many of us, Im sure, have believed all along.

    Tilly Smith, from Oxshott, Surrey, England, was holidaying with her parents and 7 year old sister on Mai Khou beach in Phuket, Thailand, when the tide rushed out. As the other toursists watched in amazement, the water began to bubble and the boats on the horizon started to violently bob up and down. Tilly, who had studied tsunamis in a geography class two weeks earlier, quickly realized they were in danger and told her mummy. Her mother alerted hotel staff who immediately evacuated the beach and hotel. The tsunami struck minutes later, but no one on the beach was killed or seriously injured.

    I really liked this story and not just because its entertaining. It really presents information literacy within its true context, that is within the learning process related to whatever topic (in this case, it was geography) and also at the moment learning is realized. Again, I think speaks to how information literacy education is a collaborative process between teachers and school librarians, between professors and academic librarians and of course our students. PA is 11th HS graduation rateOH is 23rd PA is top 5 retention

    PA top 5 for bachelors college graduation ratesPA to 10 for associates

    Kentucky Library AssociationKentucky School Media AssociationSoutheastern Library AssociationAssociation of Research Libraries National Diversity in Libraries Conference

    A big proponent of the SKILLs Act, he pointed out that while a great deal of research evidence shows that school libraries and librarians contribute to student academic achievement, school districts continue to eliminate librarians and libraries. In the beginning.Partners: College of Education, School of Library & Information Science, and University Libraries

    In the beginning.Partners: College of Education, School of Library & Information Science, and University Libraries

    In the beginning.Partners: College of Education, School of Library & Information Science, and University Libraries

    In the beginning.Partners: College of Education, School of Library & Information Science, and University Libraries

    Program objectives: Build on, reinforce and introduce important information literacy skillsLower student library anxietyHelp students with high school assignmentsEstablish collaboration between academic and school librariansPromote higher education

    People always ask me: what do we need to teach students.Freely available, Web-basedBased on Information Power and Ohio state standards9th and 6th grade-levelTwo general assessments of 25-30 questions exist for both levels12th grade-level assessment coming soonReports available at class and individual levels

    ALA LibrarianshipInformation literacy standardsWe depend on collaboration

    Learn about the professional organizations, statewide and regionally, that support librarians K-16.

    All provide opportunities for insight and collaboration

    ACRLs Info Lit Competency StandardsAASLs Information PowerAASLs Standards for the 21st Century Learner.

    A good starting point.

    Can serve as a great tool for communicating with other educators.

    Take advantage of meetings like todays to commit to assessment projects.

    Consider a combination of methodologies to examine affective, cognitive and authentic outcomes.

    But realize you might not be able to do it all. Do what you can?

    Consider taking a leadership role in statewide discussions about K-16 educational alignment and the high school to college transition.

    Librarians play an important role and belong at the table.