investing in a brighter tomorrow

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The Salvation Army Australia Eastern Territory June 2011 Volume 15 Issue 6 Coalface News | Features | Holy Habits | Mission Priorities | Opinion | Promoted to Glory | Reviews | Social Justice Commissioner James Condon | Major Peter Farthing | Major Barbara Sampson | James MacDonald | Lieut-Colonel Maxwell Ryan ARTICLES BY TASTE OF HEAVEN CAMPSIE’S BIG ENROLMENT DAY FOUNDERS’ DAY LOST? GENERAL’S QUOTE FIGHTS ON SAFE AS HOUSES SALVOS FIGHT AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN A INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY APPEAL SUNDAY 3 JULY INVESTING TOMORROW BRIGHTER

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Indigenous Community Appeal

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Page 1: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

The Salvation Army Australia Eastern Territory

June 2011 Volume 15 Issue 6

Coalface News | Features | Holy Habits | Mission Priorities | Opinion | Promoted to Glory | Reviews | Social Justice

Commissioner James Condon | Major Peter Farthing | Major Barbara Sampson | James MacDonald | Lieut-Colonel Maxwell Ryan

ARTICLES BY

TASTE OF HEAVENCampsie’s big enrolment day

FOUNDERS’ DAY LOST?general’s quote fights on

SAFE AS HOUSESsalvos fight against human traffiCking

in a

IndIgenous communIt y AppeAlSunday 3 July

inveSting

tomorrowb r i g h t e r

Page 2: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow
Page 3: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

3 EDITORIAL

5 TC@PIPELINE

22 HOW TO DO JUSTICE

23 HOLY HABITS

24-25 WHAT WOULD JESUS VIEW?

26-27 MISSION PRIORITIES UPDATE

28-37 COALFACE NEWS

38-39 PROMOTED TO GLORY

R E G U L A R S

The Salvation ArmyWILLIAM BOOTH, Founder

International Headquarters101 Queen Victoria streetLondon EC4P 4EP

Linda Bond, General

Australia Eastern Territory140 Elizabeth Street Sydney NSW 2000

James Condon, CommissionerTerritorial Commander

Peter Sutcliffe, MajorCommunications Director

Scott SimpsonManaging Editor

Graphic design: Kem Pobjie

Cover photo: Shairon Paterson

Pipeline is a publication of the Communications Team

Editorial and correspondence:Address: PO Box A435Sydney South NSW 1235Phone: (02) 9266 9690www.salvos.org.auEmail: [email protected]

Published for: The Salvation Army Australia Eastern Territory by Commissioner James Condon.Printed by:SOS Print + Media Group65 Burrows Rd, AlexandriaNSW 2015, AustraliaPrint Post ApprovedPP236902/00023

4 TASTE OF HEAVENCampsie Corps enrols 18 new Senior Soldiers in one day

14-15 SAFE-HOUSE AN OPEN DOORThe Salvation Army is a key player in the fight against human trafficking. By Simone Worthing

17 MORE LIKE HELL THAN HOME Naomi Singlehurst reveals the shocking living conditions for many stricken by poverty

18-19 WHATEVER HAPPENED TO FOUNDERS’ DAYChristine Barrett wonders why this important anniversary seems to have slipped off The Salvation Army calendar

F E A T U R E S

8-13 INVESTING IN A BRIGHTER TOMORROWIn the lead-up to the Indigenous Community Appeal next month, Bill Simpson looks at the work of The Salvation Army in this area of ministry

C O V E R S T O R Y

14

8

Contents

In 2001, Aboriginal artist Cindy Alsop was commissioned to produce a painting to symbolise The Salvation Army’s commitment to reconciliation.

The painting’s message is very powerful. It depicts true reconciliation happening when Indigenous and non-Indigenous people journey together and sit at the foot of the cross of Christ. After encountering Jesus they leave as reconciled people, working hand-in-hand to reach out to others in the darkness.

It is with this strong conviction that we move forward as The Salvation Army to embrace our nation’s first people, to share in the richness of culture and people, to engage with the challenges of injustice and to believe in God for true reconciliation and transformation.

To date we have made wonderful progress in engaging with Indigenous ministry, and the establishment of the National Indigenous Reference Group has been an integral part of guiding this ministry. We have a solid framework that will allow us to move forward with effective and culturally appropriate approaches to this important ministry.

Ministries thriving It is encouraging to see Indigenous ministry advancing in North Ipswich and Moree, in particular, with each having a distinct flavour to its work. We continue to see people saved and set free to be all that God has intended them to be.

These ministries continue to evolve and develop as God leads and in response to the emerging needs of the community.

Yet these are not the only areas where Indigenous ministry is taking place. We continue to discover corps and centres across the territory that are engaging so beautifully with the Indigenous community in their immediate area. We have some wonderful developments happening in Far North Queensland.

God is orchestrating some amazing connections into the community and is calling us to be open and embracing of Indigenous brothers and sisters, to receive them into our gatherings and allow for them to encounter and express Jesus through their cultural context.

But we have a long way to go and have a tremendous opportunity presenting itself before us. The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Day of Celebration (NAIDOC) is on 4-11 July. We are taking this opportunity to encourage all expressions of our movement to celebrate Indigenous people and culture in our various worship gatherings.

An important aspect of this will be a tax-deductible Indigenous Community Appeal on Sunday, 3 July, that will focus on raising much-needed funds to support the Indigenous community development work of the Army in the territory.

Funds from this appeal will be applied to initiatives that will enable us as a movement to make significant inroads into Indigenous disadvantage and “close the gap” that exists between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in our land.

Adrian KistanTerritorial Indigenous Program Coordinator

Editoria l Painting a true picture of reconciliation

IN THIS MONTH’S wOMEN IN TOUCH Global Mission - answering the call

- answering the call

J U N E | 2 0 1 1 | V O L U M E 1 2 | I S S U E 2

pipeline 06/2011 3

Page 4: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

Campsie enrolment day a taste of HeavenBy STEVEN PEARSE

Eighteen people representing a variety of nationalities have been enrolled as Senior Soldiers during a memorable Sunday at

The Salvation Army’s Campsie Corps in Sydney.

Ranging in age from 14 to 49 years, the group, representing a mix of Chinese, Sierra Leone, Jamaican and Australian cultures, was testament to the tangible effects of God’s wonderful power, love and grace working in the lives of people of all nations.

The service, led by Campsie Corps Officers Majors Bruce and Glenys Domrow, assisted by Envoy Alan Wu, was conducted on a Sunday afternoon in April, to allow the large group to take centre stage.

“The whole service was handed over to the enrolment celebration ceremony and we did this because there was so many of them. We wanted the focus to be totally on these new soldiers. It was a wonderful day, very inspiring,” said Major Glenys Domrow.

The group of new soldiers is yet another clear demonstration that God is at work in the community of faith that is the Campsie Corps.

“Many of these enrolments are the result of a lot of relational ministry - friendship evangelism - that is going on in our community,” said Major Domrow.

“Campsie is a very multicultural area and our congregation now reflects our community. Around our hall we have 43 different national flags flying which represent the nationalities involved in the many ministries of the corps.

“To look down at the congregation

from the platform on a Sunday and see so many people from so many different countries worshipping God together is a beautiful experience. It truly is a taste of Heaven.”

Many of the new Senior Soldiers also took the opportunity to give their testimony during the enrolment service.

“We left it open for the new soldiers to testify - we took the deliberate decision not to prearrange a sharing time,” said Major Domrow.

“A lot of them stood and spoke or sang

about the work God has been doing in their lives, what it means to them to be a soldier in The Salvation Army and how much they feel loved at Campsie Corps.

“Also, since the service we’ve already had people coming to us keen to become soldiers and asking when the next series of enrolment classes is starting. So watch this space!”

In this month’s Mission Priorities Update (pages 26-27) we focus on soldiership in The Salvation Army.

The new Senior Soldiers, (pictured with Majors Bruce and Glenys Domrow, Envoys Alan and Amy Wu, Recruiting Sergeant Des Pearse and Assistant Recruiting Sergeant Major Margaret Redmond), are Adele Masters, Mikhail Kallon, Patrice Taylor, Lily Li, Grace Liu, Rebecca Koroma, Memuna Mansaray, Mariama Kamara, Emma Wei, Bill Yi Li, Ramatu Musa, Bahkar Jalloh, Fea Musa, Osman Fornah, Sam Kamara, Emma Kamara, Peter Sankoh and Christiana Jones.

4

Up to 2,000 Australians die through suicide every 12 months.

Around 16,000 Australians are left affected. YOU can help.

In less than an hour you can learn how to become aware of the warning signs that someone’s in trouble and possibly considering suicide.

Everyone should learn – one day you might save a life.

To find out more go to suicideprevention.salvos.org.au

Page 5: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

pipeline 06/2011 5

wearing. New resources will be available later this year to assist people in preparation for soldiership.

Margaret Poore, a passionate soldier of Parramatta Corps, has been appointed the soldiership representative (Mission Priority Seven) on the Territorial Mission Priorities taskforce and already is engaged in the job of encouraging a significant increase in soldiers. You can read about her in the Mission Priorities section.

We are here to serve and soldiership is one means of doing this. Soldiers wearing the Army uniform are easily identified and in so doing make a statement that they are available. We need more soldiers in the army as we fight against the evil and darkness in our communities. Evangeline Booth expresses it clearly in her song:

I call to arms the soldiers of the blood and fireGo with the Holy Bible. Its words are peace and lifeTo multitudes who struggle with crime and want and strifeGo with your songs of mercy, show Christ in loving kindnessMake known the sufferings of the cross, the sacrifice of God.

Commissioner Harry Read in his song God’s Soldier sends a compelling call to soldiers to be fully engaged in the battle and “from his duties never flee”.

We need soldiers who are fully engaged in the warfare – not just sitting in the pews as spectators. There are endless possibilities for mission right on our doorstep and we need signed-up soldiers to be involved. We need a significant increase in soldiers – if you haven’t already signed up, speak to your corps officer about doing some preparation classes to get you ready for battle. The times are urgent. Enlist and help us make a difference in Australia.

Commissioner James Condon is Territorial Commander of the Australia Eastern Territory

W hen I heard the exciting news of 18 Seniors Soldiers being

sworn in at Campsie, I took a moment to reflect on the moment when I was enrolled.

It was in 1967 at the then Nowra Corps. It was a proud moment in my life as I stood before the congregation in my new uniform (right). I was proud to wear the uniform of The Salvation Army and still am proud today.

These are exciting days in our territory.

God is at work and people are responding to the challenge to stand up and be counted as soldiers of The Salvation Army.

In 2008 when people were asked what should be the focus for the territory, among the responses received were people indicating that they wanted to see “a significant increase of new soldiers and officers”.

In recent weeks we thank God that soldiers are joining up in several corps around our territory. You can read about the exciting afternoon at Campsie (on page 4) when 18 new senior soldiers of different cultures were enrolled. Praise the Lord for what is happening at Campsie.

The Gympie corps has been encouraged and experiencing a real sense of excitement because of the enrolment of three new senior soldiers last month. Two young men who took this step, when asked the reason said “Wearing the Army uniform will help me to win my friends for Christ. They might listen to me and it will give me a sense of belonging.”

Some would say you don’t need to wear uniform to belong but I thank God that people are still finding a sense of belonging and acceptance when they don the uniform.

Major Peter Farthing has written a helpful article in this month’s Mission Priorities section (pages 26-27) of Pipeline on the reasons for wearing uniform and it is so good to see people of every age and culture embracing soldiership and uniform

Commissioner JAMES CONDON is heartened by the number of people making a stand for Christ throughout the australia eastern territory and enlisting as senior soldiers

Taking pride in the uniform

Page 6: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

6

Spirit responds by filling each person, so that they “continued to speak the word with boldness” (Acts 4:31).

Was this one of those “for them and not for us” things? In Ephesians, the Apostle Paul settles that question with his request, “Pray for me that I would speak boldly as I ought to speak” (Ephesians 6:19).

Boldness is the biblical manner in which God wants the Gospel given. We are not to develop our own methods based upon personality or passion. We are to open our mouths and unapologetically testify to the saving power of Jesus Christ. Is it possible that the commonly reported frustrations in personal evangelism and our epidemic failure to evangelise at all is rooted in our failure to embrace the biblical method of boldness?

Clear and compellingThe Greek term translated bold or boldly or boldness, means “candour in the face of opposition”. We should give a candid, clear, compassionate, compelling witness to the news of how sins can be forgiven in Jesus Christ and how we have experienced that reality personally.

Boldness isn’t being obnoxious – I’m gonna shove this down your throat whether you want to hear it or not. Boldness can be very gentle, kind and from a loving heart. It’s not mean or pushy; it’s just convinced. Boldness does not adjust the presentation to avoid a negative response. Paul said: “But we have renounced disgraceful, underhanded ways. We refuse to practice cunning or to tamper with God’s word, but by the open statement of the truth we would commend ourselves to

In many of God’s commands he gives his children freedom in the mechanics of obedience. For example, in marriage, a man and woman are

to commit for a lifetime, but we are not told how that marriage is to be established day by day. Pastors are to preach the Word, but many methods are biblical, and the preacher is given freedom to choose. In only a few instances does the Lord prescribe both the action and the method. Evangelism is one of those cases, and the biblical method for evangelism is boldness.

Acts 3-4 details the church’s earliest efforts in evangelism as the disciples begin getting out the Good News post-Pentecost. After a man has been healed, Peter boldly proclaims the Gospel in Solomon’s porch and he and John are arrested for their presentation of Christ. The next day the two apostles are called to answer to the religious leaders for their actions. Peter does not dial back the boldness in any way, choosing instead to proclaim the Good News again. Acts 4:13 records the council’s response: “Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were uneducated, common men, they were astonished. And they recognised that they had been with Jesus.” In verse 18 Peter and John are warned not to speak in Jesus’ name. They both answer that they cannot stop speaking about their personal experience with Christ.

As soon as they are released, Peter and John run straight to their friends and start a prayer meeting, pleading with God to prevent the threats they have heard from diminishing their boldness. The Holy

Fearless evangelism - being courageous for Christ

Christians are commanded by God to ‘go into all the world and preach the gospel’. As JAMES MacDONALD explains, the biblical method for this is boldness

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pipeline 06/2011 7

overflows with the Gospel, referring to Jesus seven times in Acts 4:10-12 concluding with: “There is salvation in no-one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.”

Boldness springs from something that is happening deep inside. Jesus Christ has changed my life. Everything that I was looking for and longing for, I found in him. I have the forgiveness of sins and the promise of eternal life. I have a peace that passes understanding. I have a love for people whom I should hate. I have joy and a strength I knew nothing about, so how could I not try to tell others that they can have it, too? That is boldness!

In regard to evangelism, God has not just told us what to do, he has told us how to do it. Embrace afresh the biblical method: clear, concise, unwavering witness for Christ – even in the face of opposition. The bold way is the biblical way. Testify boldly and without fear, regardless of the response, and you will know God’s favour upon your witness for Christ.

This article appeared in the March issue of Decision magazine and is reproduced courtesy of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association.

James MacDonald is Senior Pastor of Harvest Bible Chapel in Chicago.

everyone’s conscience in the sight of God” (2 Corinthians 4:2). Boldness knows that salvation is of the Lord, “and as many as were appointed to eternal life believed” (Acts 13:48). Boldness is the Spirit-given conviction that we must speak about what we have seen and heard in Christ.

In Acts 4:1–3 the disciples were boldly “proclaiming in Jesus the resurrection from the dead” and the opposition didn’t believe in much except being in charge so “they arrested them”.

Instead “many of those who had heard the word believed, and the number of the men came to be about five thousand” (Acts 4:4). Though arrested for their witness, the apostles’ boldness was being blessed! The problem today is that we want the fruit without the fallout. We want to see people converted but don’t want any feathers ruffled or anyone to get upset when they reject the Gospel. Today we want to be the aroma of life to those who are being saved without being the aroma of death to those who are perishing (2 Corinthians 2:15). Pursuit of that impossibility has led to a suppression of the biblical model for boldness in most places. Peter and John were imprisoned, Paul and Stephen were stoned, and Christ Himself was crucified for the offence created in speaking the truth.

If you start talking freely, openly and authentically about Jesus Christ, you must anticipate some of the same—count on it. Regardless of what the strategists say, negative reaction is not always reflective of poor presentation. If you give witness to Jesus Christ and people get upset, you’re not necessarily doing it wrong. We should not be seeking a way to evangelise where everyone likes us and no-one ever gets upset. I wish I could hear some of our modern strategists explaining their plans to the evangelists in the early church. “Hey Peter and John, if you just round off the corners a bit, you can reach a lot of people and avoid jail time.”

Satisfied soulBiblical boldness for Christ is a fountain that bursts forth from a satisfied soul. Even when facing the authorities, Peter

Fearless evangelism - being courageous for Christ

Growing SaintsIntegrity

“Boldness can be very gentle, kind and from a loving heart.

It’s not mean or pushy; it’s just

convinced.”

In much of today’s church this would have signalled the need for some consultants: “Guys, if you’re going to win friends and influence people, you’re going to have to tone it down a little. Round off the edges, make the Gospel more appealing, more acceptable, less offensive to the modern mind-set.”

But that’s not how it happened in Acts.

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The Salvation Army is getting in tune with the Indigenous community in a variety of ways.

8

Together on journey to brighter tomorrowThe Salvation Army has made giant strides in its mission to connect with the Indigenous community. Pipeline reporter BILL SIMPSON gives an update on the progress being made and shares the stories of three Indigenous people in North Queensland who recently became soldiers or adherents

The Salvation Army Australia Eastern Territory is making significant progress in its desire to appeal to the Indigenous

community, according to Territorial Indigenous Program Coordinator Adrian Kistan.

While there was still a long way to go in Indigenous ministry, many people were coming on the journey of reconciliation and restoration, he told Pipeline.

“We are seeing and hearing of more and more Indigenous ministry expressions and engagements from corps and centres.

“We are seeing a growing interest and passion to know more about Indigenous culture and understanding how best to engage with the Indigenous community.”

Adrian credits the significant progress to a vastly different approach to the way in which Indigenous ministry is approached by Salvation Army leadership.

“The Salvation Army has a long history of Indigenous ministry,” he said. “Places like Deniliquin and Moree have long had a significant ministry into the surrounding Indigenous community that resulted in a multitude of people saved.

“For many years, The Salvation Army ran the Purga [Ipswich, Queensland] mission and had deep connections to the Aboriginal community until it closed some years ago.

“So, this is not a new ministry for The Salvation Army. The dynamic of and approach to the ministry, however, is considerably different.”

The ministry focus now was on working in partnership with Indigenous people rather than Salvation Army leadership deciding what was best for them.

It was not about ministering to Indigenous people, but, rather, ministering alongside Indigenous people to see people saved and living out the fullness of life as Jesus promised.

“It’s not ‘us’ and ‘them’. It is ‘us together’,” he said. A key factor was the establishment of a Salvation Army

IndIgenous CommunIty AppeAl

Page 9: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

Spending time with Indigenous people on their own turf is a vital way of building relationships. Photos: Shairon Paterson

pipeline 06/2011 9

Sunday 3 July

national Indigenous reference group, which included Indigenous people from the Army.

“This group allows the Indigenous voice of our movement to be heard and to guide The Salvation Army’s Indigenous work. This group is tackling some big-picture items in regard to Indigenous ministry and challenges, but always through the eyes and reality of Indigenous people.”

Adrian believes that the Indigenous community accepts that The Salvation Army is serious about working alongside Indigenous people – a belief confirmed last year by North Ipswich Indigenous

Ministries coordinator Envoy Judith McAvoy.

Envoy McAvoy told Pipeline at the time that for the first time in her long association with The Salvation Army she was seeing positive signs of progress in its relationship with Indigenous affairs.

The progress, she said, was due to The Salvation Army’s attitude to be intentional about Indigenous ministry and take advice from Indigenous people rather than give directions. The national Indigenous reference group mentioned by Adrian was a huge step forward, she said.

Adrian says there is now an openness

to the work of The Salvation Army in most areas of the territory.

“The key to this is how embracing our local leadership and people are to our Indigenous brothers and sisters.

“When we take the time to connect and build trust and relationship, and appreciate the contribution that Indigenous people make to our lives and the life of our church, we see God’s Spirit move in wonderful ways amongst us.

“The truth is that we are doing a great job in most places. However, we still have some challenges in some of our settings.

“But with education and God’s Spirit stirring in us, we can see this change.”

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Timena Rhodes says she feels at home in The Salvation Army in Cairns.

10

Timena mixes two worlds into one

Timena Rhodes is a perfect example of the saying that you can’t judge a book by its cover or a person by the

colour of their skin.The 33-year-old Cairns school teacher

is from the Kuku Yalangi Aboriginal tribe in North Queensland’s famous Daintree forest.

Her mother is of Aboriginal descent while her father is British. She was born on Thursday Island in the Torres Strait, but raised around Daintree, north of Cairns.

She considers herself Indigenous and identifies with the Aboriginal culture. “My life has been like being part of two worlds,” she told Pipeline.

“I grew up in an Aboriginal community. I’m the whitest in the family. They call me ‘snowflake’. But I am also part of the white person’s world.”

In her Aboriginal culture childhood, Timena hunted and cooked with the community women. In her teens, her father desired a better formal education for her and her brother, and sent them to boarding school.

“I think the two sides of life have made it easier for me to adapt to both worlds. It has certainly helped me to understand both worlds.”

Timena became a Salvation Army soldier at the Cairns Corps last November. She had had a casual connection through working as a volunteer at the Family Store, attached to the corps.

Almost two years ago, she went to Britain and a lecturing position at a college in Oxford. While there, she went searching for – and found – the local Salvation Army.

“Even though I had been invited to attend The Salvation Army in Cairns and didn’t go, I was comfortable at The

Salvation Army in Oxford. So, when I came back home [to Cairns] 12 months ago, I came to the church here. And I’ve been coming ever since.”

For somebody with such a mix of culture, it was easy for Timena to feel comfortable in Cairns Corps. It is a multi-cultural corps, with people from Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Torres Strait and other cultures involved.

“I felt at home straight away, really. It’s not a big thing being from a different culture to the majority of people here.”

Deciding on soldiership wasn’t difficult for Timena, except for the uniform.

As a non-drinker, non-smoker, non-gambler and Christ follower, she felt she was living according to Salvation Army soldiership requirements, anyway – and came to terms with uniform wearing.

After her enrolment, Timena joined the Cairns Corps worship team and volunteered as one of the organisers of Outreach Mission into a housing development, which is predominantly an Indigenous community in a nearby suburb of Cairns. The Outreach Mission includes a “Kids Brekky” along with stories and games.

Within days of talking with Pipeline, Timena left Cairns again to work as a school teacher in the Torres Strait Islands. She took her Salvation Army uniform with her.

Timena believes that any group from The Salvation Army intentionally trying to include the Indigenous community in its operations ought to “build up trust and relationships between communities”.

“Indigenous communities need to be listened to and appreciated for their culture – not told what they will do.”

IndIgenous CommunIty AppeAl

Indigenous Community

Appeal 3 July 2011

Artist: CINDY ALSOP

Page 11: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

Musu Idaigi and his trusted bicycle which he uses as a vehicle for ministry in Cairns.

pipeline 06/2011 11

Musu finds spiritual home in Cairns

Too much grog growing up on Thursday Island in the Torres Strait turned Musu Idaigi into a “bad

boy”.Almost four years ago, Musu was sent,

for his sins, to a correctional institution at Cairns, in Far North Queensland.

He really wasn’t a bad boy. Musu had been raised in a Christian home. But when the grog got a hold on him, he was a different man. He did things that sometimes he could not remember doing.

While in prison, he determined that upon release he would turn his life around. “I asked God for direction,” he told Pipeline. “I got what I asked for.”

After release almost 12 months ago, he decided to stay in Cairns and try a TAFE course. As part of an unemployment benefit arrangement with Centrelink, he was assigned to a work-for-the dole scheme run by the job network.

He was assigned to The Salvation Army’s Family Store attached to Cairns Corps. It was a 12-month assignment, working six hours a week sorting through clothing and other community donations.

Musu was so enthusiastic, he completed his scheduled hours months ahead of plan. He stayed on as a volunteer and is still there.

However, something much bigger happened in his life while working for the dole. In his mid-40s, he committed his life to Christ and is now an adherent.

“I didn’t know anything about The Salvation Army until I came to Cairns and was sent here by the job network people,” he said.

“One day while I was working at the Family Store, another volunteer said to me that I should go to the church. So, I did, one Sunday morning. I liked it. I could feel something by going.

“I think that was a few months after I started at the Family Store and I have been coming ever since. And then I said I would like to be an adherent. The people have been nice to me. They didn’t care about my past or where I had come from.”

At the corps, Musu is part of a mission team. He has been helping Alison Geno (Mission Team and Family Store manager) in outreach into a local Aboriginal community.

“I have been advising Alison on how Aboriginal communities like to work. It isn’t easy to get in to some of these places.

“When I went to this particular community, I saw some of the boys I had been with at the correctional institution. I hope they will trust me enough to do something to help their community.”

Musu also rides a bicycle around Cairns looking for people to help.

“It doesn’t matter if they are black or white, I try to help them. It’s not a colour thing with me.

“I think I have a sense for people in need. So, when I see somebody like that, I just talk with them and offer them help.”

Musu has another impressive objective on his spiritual journey.

“The first day at The Salvation Army, I could feel something special. I have now

decided to put my foot down. This is ground that I can stand on.

“My next step is to wear the white shirt of The Salvation Army. I want to become a soldier.

“The Salvation Army is my family and my home now.

“If I went back to Thursday Island, life would not be like this. I would start boozing up again.

“This [life] is right for me now. God has brought me here.”

Sunday 3 July

Photos: Shairon Paterson

Page 12: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

When Shirli Congoo reconnected with The Salvation

Army through tragic circumstances 12 months ago, she was adamant she “would not be saved by any white person”.

And she meant it! More than 200 years of “bad history” for the Indigenous community, including a lifetime of personal prejudice against her and other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, had left Shirli distrustful of any white person in authority.

At the time, only her “own people” – the Indigenous – were welcome to make changes in her life.

Shirli was dedicated as a baby in The Salvation Army in Brisbane 43 years ago. But the only contact she had had since was receiving toys from Salvation Army people as a child. She now lives in Townsville.

When a brother died last June, the local Salvation Army helped finance the funeral. It was held at The Salvation Army Townsville Riverway Recovery Mission, which incorporates the local Salvation Army church, rehabilitation services and

Shirli saved by God of all cultures

welfare centre. Shirli and her family were invited back for Sunday worship. “When I turned up and saw so many white people, I asked Bruce [mission Team Leader Major Bruce Harmer] if I would have to leave my Indigenous culture at the front door,” Shirli told Pipeline for this article.

“Bruce said ‘no’; that he was grateful for the opportunity to engage with me and my culture. He said he could learn a lot from me. This encouraged me to continue attending church.”

was going to save me. But through a series of experiences, God began to speak to me. He told me that I was not being saved by Bruce or any other white person. He told me that I, like everybody else, had been saved by his Son, Jesus Christ.

“As I worked through that, I was able to accept it.”

Major Harmer told Pipeline he was impressed with Shirli’s dedication. “It means she truly understands that it’s not about me or anybody else; it’s about Jesus and his love for Shirli.”

Shirli’s reconnection with The Salvation Army came after years of painful life experience, including tragic family circumstances over a 14-month period.

She lost a nephew she was caring for, an uncle and two brothers – the last in January this year.

A nephew, Arnold Fewquandie, was a regular attender at The Salvation Army’s North Ipswich Indigenous Ministries in Brisbane. He had a friendship with Joel Maxwell from the North Ipswich mission. When one of Shirli’s brothers died in Townsville last year, Joel and Arnold arranged funeral assistance from the Townsville Riverway Recovery Mission.

“Joel came to Townsville to support Arnold and our family through their sorry business after the suicide of our younger brother in June,” Shirli said.

“I couldn’t believe how kind The Salvation Army was being. When I

Young people play a major role in the lives of Shirli and Chris Congoo, having cared for 23 children.

Shirli Congoo with Townsville Riverway Recovery Mission Team Leader Major Bruce Harmer. Photos: Shairon Paterson

In late April, Shirli was enrolled by Australia Eastern Territory Chief Secretary Colonel Wayne Maxwell as a soldier of the Townsville Riverway Recovery Mission.

“I was adamant when I first started going to the church that no white person

12

IndIgenous CommunIty AppeAl

“I was adamant when I first started going to the church

that no white person was going

to save me”

Page 13: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

thanked them [Arnold and Joel], they said: ‘Don’t thank us; thank God’. I thought: ‘That’s amazing; I want to know this God’.”

When family arrived in Townsville for the funeral, Shirli discovered an older brother, who was also living in Townsville, was very sick. He was in hospital with a mystery illness, unable to speak or move. A sister, who is a Christian and had gone to Townsville to see her brother, left Shirli with a Bible, with instructions to read Psalms to him.

“I wasn’t really interested in reading the Bible, but didn’t want to lie if my sister asked me about it. So I opened the Bible and started reading Psalms. And I read it very softly because I was embarrassed in front of other patients.

“As I was reading softly so that nobody would really hear me, a voice said: ‘Read louder’. I believe it was the voice of God. And, so, I did (read louder). Was this really me asking God for help or something else?

“It was Psalm 5:1-3: Give ear to my words, O Lord; consider my sighing. Listen to my cry for help, my King and my God, for to you I pray. In the morning, O Lord, you hear my voice; in the morning, I lay my requests before you and wait in expectation.

“Anyway, my brother in hospital who hadn’t been able to speak, sat up in his bed and said: ‘I can talk’. I thought: ‘That’s amazing’. This is a story I often share and it brings me pure joy knowing that on this day, my brother was able to speak again and feeling a love for God who made himself known to me.”

Shirli’s brother was released from hospital and attended the funeral of their younger brother.

As Shirli began to feel more comfortable at The Salvation Army, she spent more time reading the Bible her sister had given her at the hospital. She began praying and accepting the prayers of others for her.

Arrangements were made for Shirli to attend a Christ in Cultural conference in Sydney about black theology. She began to see how God was the God of all cultures.

“And as I read my Bible, I could see how much it had in common with Aboriginal culture. I struggled with church at the beginning because whenever I had gone in the past it had usually been for a funeral. I only knew sad times in church. But now it was different.”

Shirli’s mother, a Christian, travelled 800km from Cloncurry to be at her daughter’s enrolment.

“Fifteen of my family and friends

attended to witness me become a soldier. If I hadn’t been going to church, I would have been in despair and overwhelmed by grief with the loss of so many family members so quickly. But, I’m really happy and able to seek support from my family, church leaders, fellowship and the Bible. Does it show?”

Shirli is currently working as a senior Indigenous resources officer with the Queensland Department of Community in Townsville.

She and her husband have five children of their own and are caring for four other children at their home. They have cared for a total of 23 children from both sides of their families and consider it a gift.

“I thank God for always being in my life, even though I may not have known it. When I think of how I’ve been looked after, I am amazed at God’s love.”

Bill Simpson is a writer for Pipeline and supplements.Young people play a major role in the lives of Shirli and Chris Congoo, having cared for 23 children.

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Sunday 3 July

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The Salvation Army is continuing its effort to end modern-day slavery as it expands the services of its safe-house in Sydney and, as SIMONE WORTHING reveals, raise awareness of the issue globally

he wretched business of slavery has reinvented itself through practices that many of us thought were abolished long ago.

According to the United Nations, $US31.6 billion of profit is extracted from 12.3 million people in forced labour every year. Approximately two million of these people are the victims of human trafficking, with 80 per cent of them being women and children.

The UN reports that people are trafficked from 127 countries and are exploited in 137 nations around the world, including Australia.

People are trafficked here for the purpose of forced labour, slavery, and sexual servitude. Many are in debt bondage – forced to pay off debts their employers say they owe. These types of abuses can occur in workplaces, in private homes and through marriage.

The Salvation Army is a key international player in the global movement against slavery as it cares for victims, advocates for policy reform and raises awareness of how local communities can join the effort.

In Sydney, The Salvation Army’s Safe-House for Trafficked Women opened its doors at the beginning of 2008 as a 10-bed refuge where victims could receive the support and services they needed to pursue their human rights. Since then, the service has expanded to include a growing number of non-residential clients – men, women and young people who are supported as they rebuild their lives.

Jenny Stanger is the supervisor of the safe-house. She explains that clients have complex legal and social needs throughout this process.

“Salvos Legal [a free legal service for people who cannot afford to pay] is our main partner and offers a comprehensive legal service that complements our social service,” Jenny says.

“This includes criminal, migration and family matters that may need to be dealt with both in Australia and the client’s home country. If we can succeed for clients legally, including getting victim compensation, back wages or other civil remedies, it can give them a good footing for the future.”

Jenny believes that slavery in Australia

is more common than most people could imagine and is something that can happen to anyone who is vulnerable. She cites a case currently before the NSW courts alleging that an Anglo-Australian couple enslaved and assaulted two Anglo-Australian adults, a male and a female, in their home as domestic workers.

“We should be taking the broadest view possible so that our response catches people who would otherwise fall through the cracks,” Jenny says.

“It’s about reducing people’s vulnerabilities and ensuring their basic human rights are protected.”

Agriculture, construction, hospitality, mining, maritime services, manufacturing, health care, restaurants, domestic services, sex services, forced and slave-like marriages are just some of the contexts where serious exploitation has been uncovered.

Community supportThe Salvation Army safe-house is almost entirely funded by the Red Shield Appeal. The safe-house also receives critical donations and assistance from individuals and community groups.

The Zonta District 24 is sponsoring mental health needs of clients, the Rotary Club of Campsie has constructed a beautiful roof-top garden at the safe-house, and other clubs have donated quality clothing. Individuals have also donated goods in-kind and raised money through community events.

Jenny emphasises the need for cash donations and gift cards so clients can choose and purchase items for themselves, as well as for the safe-house.

“It’s really about the community stepping up and taking action to help,” she explains. “Ultimately, I’d like for community members and companies to sponsor each of our 10 rooms on an annual basis.”

Dedicated volunteers have mentored clients, and provided job-seeking assistance and avenues for skills development and socialising (see volunteer comments). This support is critical for the clients of the service. The vast majority of them just want safety and acceptance in the community and the opportunity to contribute to society.

“Practically speaking, our clients are all super-motivated to work,” Jenny says. “If you own a business and employ people, contact us and see if we have someone who would meet your needs.

“Sponsor education or apprenticeships for our clients, give them work experience or become a mentor for them. They just want what we all want; an opportunity to take care of their families.”

The safe-house staff also work with The Salvation Army in the countries of origin of their clients. “There may be safety issues for the families left behind, with traffickers or agents returning and making threats,” Jenny explains.

“So we tap into the strength of The

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Salvation Army safe-house supervisor Jenny Stanger with an artwork – a bird breaking free from its cage – which depicts the “freedom” people feel when the chains of human trafficking are broken. Photo: Shairon Paterson

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Salvation Army worldwide to help client families stay safe and well. That is part of being holistic in our view of the person we are working with. Our work always has been simultaneously local, national and international.”

It is easy for the average person to feel overwhelmed by the breadth and complexity of the millions of people caught up in the web of slavery and human trafficking around the world today.

“Twelve million people [in forced labour] and $30 billion [profits from slavery] are minuscule numbers relative to the global population and the global economy,” Jenny says.

“We know much more now than we

did when I started this journey 13 years ago. I don’t let the statistics deter me. I’m just going to keep on working.”

Editor’s note: For a profile on Jenny, more about The Salvation Army’s work in human trafficking and contact information, see this month’s Women In Touch, pages 16-17.

Simone Worthing is a staff writer for Pipeline and supplements.

What the volunteers say ...

Lesley - “It has been a great privilege to work with the women that come to Samaritan House, whether it is to teach them a craft or just to chat. I am inspired by their enthusiasm, creativity and tenacity in a time when they are experiencing such upheaval and uncertainty. My hope is that we can carry on working with them as they find their independence and regain their self-esteem. To help us do this you can donate any unused craft items – we will make use of them! Or you could send a gift card from Spotlight or Lincraft and we can purchase on your behalf.”

Jo - “I was looking for a way to use my design skills to help people in our community. Creativity can be so rewarding for those experiencing difficult circumstances as it gives them a sense of achievement in a very tangible way. The women have been able to make jewellery, soft furnishings and knits for themselves, thanks to donations. It is a warm and friendly environment where they can work on a project or just come for a chat. It is wonderful for us to see them work through all the stages in the refuge to become fully independent members of our community.”

Dianne - “Through Jenny, residents who expressed an interest in a career in nursing were linked to me with their consent. This offered me a vehicle to use my expertise and time to support them in this process. As I am a long-term senior nursing academic in the Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health at University of Technology, Sydney, currently sloping towards retirement, it seemed a good match. We meet sporadically for an hour or so according to the schedules of both of us. Often it is weekly. The activities and discussions are tailored according to the individual’s needs and interests. Clearly the carefully thought-out efforts to provide the support services these women need is critical to their successful adjustment and transition into a satisfying and productive life.”

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Meals for the hungry Beds for the homeless

Assistance in finding employment Refuge to victims of abuse

Salvos Stores offer great finds like one-off vintage pieces and incredible fabrics - and it’s satisfying to know that every

purchase helps your community by providing;

Visit www.salvos.org.au/stores for more information or call 13 SALVOS (13 72 58)

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More like

By NAOMI SINGLEHURST

Major Bryce Davies and five volunteers from The Salvation Army Streetlevel Mission in Brisbane were

shocked when they walked into the “boarding house” which was home to about 30 tenants.

They visited the accommodation to help move 50-year-old Paul*, a regular at the Army’s Streetlevel Mission.

“Moving Paul into better accommodation gave us a strong insight into what the worst of these boarding houses are like and there are quite a few that I know of locally. It was a very bad place ... just putrid, dark, full of bedbugs – hard to believe that in 2011 people still live like this,” says Major Davies.

“The walls were stained and it was dark and dirty. My first impression was the overwhelming smell of urine – not just opening the door and thinking ‘oh, there’s a smell’, but a completely overpowering stench.

“People living there were obviously ageing, with incontinence problems and/or addictions, mental health issues and other disabilities. I think there are nameless souls [men and women] living in the worst of these places that nobody cares about and nobody gets involved with and they really are in a living hell.

“We actually moved Paul to government accommodation which was a 150 per cent improvement. We helped stabilise him. I have coffee every month or so now with Paul and he comes into Streetlevel and cooks us up a great curry.”

Reaching outFar from an exception, the amount of substandard accommodation in Australia seems to be growing.

Wilma Gallet, author of a Salvation Army report titled Perceptions of Poverty which includes recommendations to tackle entrenched poverty, noted that “Salvation Army workers have observed a trend in the growth of unregistered boarding houses, particularly in inner-suburban

areas where unscrupulous landlords rent small rooms with inadequate facilities to homeless people.”

The report continues: “... in one inner-city suburb, some landlords attempt to cram two and sometimes three people into a single room, charging each of them $150 for the week. We have also heard of instances where homeless people are accommodated in passageways in unregistered boarding houses and are still charged $150 per week rent.”

Major Davies says The Salvation Army Streetlevel service offers referral to help clients into detox, rehabilitation and on to lists for emergency accommodation. A vibrant 70-strong worship service is also held weekly, and family-style meals are shared.

Streetlevel regulars are, where possible, also encouraged to reach out to help others which also helps them build self-esteem and a deeper sense of purpose, according to Major Davies.

For example, teams of volunteers from Streetlevel earlier this year assisted with the flood recovery effort in Brisbane and surrounding areas, going out each day to strip-clean flood-affected houses, ready for

tradesmen to come in. They also served coffee and meals during the clean-up effort for up to 100 volunteers each day in association with other local churches.

“Creating a sense of community is a key purpose of Streetlevel,” says Major Davies. “We try to connect with more and more of the most needy and vulnerable and see if we can help them find greater stability. One of the most wonderful things we have found is that ‘older’ members of our Streetlevel community – often people who’ve stepped out of boarding houses themselves only six months earlier – get beside the newcomers. They take them to the Department of Housing, tell them the ins and outs, invite them here to a hot meal, and just really help them find a real sense of belonging and support.”

*Name changed

The Salvation Army has launched a major report on poverty titled Perceptions of Poverty – An Insight into the Nature and Impact of Poverty in Australia. It highlights that two million Australians now live in poverty, and looks at the causes and impact of poverty on Australia’s most vulnerable. You can download the report at salvos.org.au/research

Many of Australia’s most vulnerable people are in situations where they are being forced to live in substandard accommodation. Photo: Shairon Paterson

hellhome

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Whatever happened to Founders’ Day?In the lead-up to this important anniversary next month, CHRISTINE BARRETT wonders why it seems to have slipped off The Salvation Army calendar

Founders’ Day in The Salvation Army has been a bit of a moveable feast. The first time it was celebrated – as Founder’s Day

(note apostrophe) – was on 10 April, 1920, which was the anniversary of William Booth’s birthday. Salvationists all over the world were asked to stop and give thanks to God for the General (pictured right).

A couple of years later, Founder’s Day had moved to 20 August, to remember the 10th anniversary of William Booth’s promotion to glory. Then, in 1924, it was decided to honour the beginnings of The Salvation Army on Mile End Waste in London – and the apostrophe moved. Except that the wrong date was chosen and the day had to be changed (after research) from 5 July to 2 July, where it has remained ever since.

I must confess that Founders’ Day has largely passed me by. However, I was brought up short when, in a recent corps council meeting, we were informed that the corps would be celebrating the occasion this year. At the time my response was limited to inquiring whether we would be singing all seven verses of the Founder’s Song. But later I began to think and – as I usually think with pen in hand – to write.

Does Founders’ Day still have a purpose in The Salvation Army? If so, how do we use the day in an age when remembering famous figures from the past is no longer a popular pastime? In an age, furthermore, when it is more usual to analyse said famous figures from a “warts and all” point of view – as a recent biography of William and Catherine Booth has demonstrated.

My thoughts went back to other anniversaries I’ve celebrated: family occasions, school anniversaries and corps anniversaries. Some good, some bad, some pure and simple nostalgia. It depends on who’s involved.

Then I had a picture of myself dressed in a short brown tunic dancing round a large and somewhat battered toadstool. It was Thinking Day that I remembered celebrating as a brownie. Brownies and

guides marked the joint birthdays of Lord and Lady Baden-Powell on that day – as they still do. They pledge to be friends and to learn to understand each other, to find out about other countries, to raise funds for good causes and to celebrate the development of the Scouting movement.

Now that seems to hold possibilities! It’s good to remember our past – we certainly won’t know where we’re going unless we know where we’re coming from – but we need to celebrate the present as well. Couldn’t we use Founders’ Day as an opportunity to take an interest in some aspect of Salvation Army work that we know little about – the small corps at the other end of town perhaps, or a community program that’s been started in our area?

How to get involvedBrownies and guides traditionally send letters and postcards to other members of the Scouting movement on World Thinking Day. How nice it would be to go into the hall on Founders’ Day and discover a letter of encouragement from a corps in the United States, or Denmark, or Papua New Guinea. Who knows what friendships might develop!

In the days when I was new to The Salvation Army the Service Corps was an excellent way for a younger person to discover the wider Salvation Army world. It is, alas, no more – but then there are now other ways for young people to explore what The Salvation Army has to offer, as a quick glance at the MORE website (www.salvos.org.au/more) will demonstrate.

There’s probably not quite so much available for adults - we’re more settled, I suppose, with family and financial responsibilities – but the International Development department (www.salvos.org.au/said) gives you some options to explore.

Perhaps Founders’ Day would be a good opportunity to highlight what’s on offer and to encourage each other (including some financial encouragement where necessary) to explore what our movement is all about in the 21st century.

So, how can we make Founders’ Day a day to remember?

Christine Barrett is a Salvationist who attends Pokesdown Corps in England.

This article was first published in the UK Salvationist magazine.

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General’s famous quote fights onSalvation Army historian GORDON TAYLOR investigates the origins of a famous quote attributed to General William Booth in 1912

One of the most famous Salvation Army traditions is that General William Booth concluded his last public address in London’s

Royal Albert Hall on 9 May, 1912, with the words: “I’ll fight – I’ll fight to the very end.”

It is, of course, exactly the kind of speech you would expect a warrior General to deliver in these circumstances, but did he say these words on that occasion and, if not, how did the tradition linking these words with this occasion develop?

What we know for certain is that the following quotation appeared in The Salvation Army’s international magazine All The World in April 1906, above a poem by Charles Coller, titled To The General:

“While women weep as they do now, I’ll fight; while little children go hungry as they do now, I’ll fight; while men go to prison, in and out, in and out, as they do now, I’ll fight. – The General.”

The poem by Coller, with the same quotation from the General, was reprinted in other publications, including Our Own Reciter (1908), The War Cry (London, 10 April 1909), and Warcry (Australia, 16 April 1910).

Now, it is not impossible that, on a later occasion, William Booth could have used the same quotation again, and even expanded on it, but none of the reports of William Booth’s last address at the Royal Albert Hall in 1912 mentioned these words at all.

The report in The Social Gazette of 18 May, 1912, said that after acknowledging his indebtedness to the Army Mother, his devoted officers and soldiers, and the many generous friends who helped the Army, the General concluded by ascribing all glory to God and resumed his seat amid a fresh outburst of admiration and sympathy.

In his Life Of William Booth, Harold Begbie included the quotation from All The World with other well-known sayings of William Booth, but did not link it with the address in the Albert Hall.

Later, when a song entitled I’ll Fight appeared in The Musical Salvationist (September 1927), the commentary said only that the song was inspired by “one of the Founder’s stirring declarations”.

It was not until 15 years after the event that an unnamed corps sergeant-major, writing in The War Cry (15 October 1927), said that he remembered William Booth’s address at the Royal Albert Hall. To the quotation from All The World, he added: “While there is a poor lost girl upon the streets, I’ll fight; while there yet remains one dark soul without the light of God, I’ll fight – I’ll fight to the very end!”

It seems a remarkable feat of memory to recall these words with such precision after 15 years, but afterwards other eyewitnesses, including Commissioner Evan Smith, who was William Booth’s

secretary in 1912, came forward with similar accounts, including almost identical versions of the quotation.

One mystery remains. If these later reports are accurate, why did the reporters at the Albert Hall in 1912 miss what would have been the most memorable conclusion to William Booth’s last public address?

Gordon Taylor is Historian and Associate Director for Historical Services at The Salvation Army’s International Heritage Centre.

This article was first published in the UK Salvationist magazine.

An artist’s view of General William Booth delivering his final public address at the Royal Albert Hall in London in May 1912.

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You are invited to join us as we mark this milestone on the weekend of 16-17 July

Special guests include:

Commissioners James and Jan Condon

The Salvation Army Parramatta Band

East Cessnock Public School Choir

Tenor soloist Murray Mayday

Events include:

Celebration concert at 7pm on Saturday 16 July at The Performing Arts Centre, Cessnock. Ticket are $15 adult, $10 concession and can be purchased online at www.cessnock.gov.au or by phoning (02) 4990 7134

Sunday 10am Combined Church Service at Mt View High School auditorium with Commissioner James Condon

Celebrating 100 years of the Salvation army in Cessnock

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In an excerpt from his latest book, Lieut-Colonel MAX RYAN warns half-hearted followers of Christ that their lives of spiritual frivolity will be uncovered when testing times arrive

Cold comfort for lukewarm Christians when spiritual battle hots up

If, as the old saying has it, “the road to hell is paved with good intentions,” then a fair number of people who think they are Christians are on the

broad road.These are weak people who at one time

or another made an emotional decision to follow Jesus but who were uninstructed in the faith. As well, they were too lazy to learn what it meant to be a Christian, and when the Lord did speak to them their hearing was tuned to other, more palatable, sounds.

They are, if the truth were known, bored to death with talk of spiritual matters, and a growing life in Christ, but they are eager to have their ears tickled with the latest bit of news, and they are positively enchanted by the newest movie.

Their god is the status quo and they live aimless lives which ignore the finer things of the Holy Spirit.

These are the heartbreak of the prophets, the despair of preachers; a silly and blind people who are ripe for the judgment of a holy God.

These are the spiritual descendants of those who crucified the Lord of Glory, spiritual corpses whose ghastly attempts at beautifying themselves only bring further degradation and despair.

These are the false Christ-naming wolves who are willing to sacrifice everything and everyone but themselves; people who pay lip service to the Most Holy One, but who, in their inner lives, serve the lord of hell itself.

God says to such: “Wake up! Awake from the slumber of death!” And those who respond to that call find themselves beholding beauty of such poignant glory that what before ravished their spirit now seems tawdry in comparison.

To those who awaken to righteousness God has the exquisite wonder of living in moment-by-moment communion with him. Oh, what a cause of celebration, of true heavenly glory!

During these times there will be a falling away from the true Church of Jesus Christ. The spiritually frivolous will be successfully seduced by the destroyer whom they have never ceased to worship in their hearts.

The lukewarm Christians, those who are along only for the good times, will be scattered when the enemy begins to press the battle. While many will flock to forms of religion which promise only peace and personal security, there will be fewer who, at personal cost, will be willing to

”The spiritually frivolous will be

successfully seduced by the

destroyer whom they have never

ceased to worship in their hearts.”

follow the way of the Cross by engaging in spiritual warfare.

And yet, far above the raging of the enemy, and distinct from the noise of the world’s mad dance of death, sounds the wild, sweet music of Heaven – the muted thunder of celestial melody that has an unutterable beauty – and that fills the heart of the hard-pressed soldier of Jesus Christ with bursting joy.

Mark where your affections lie in these perilous times, know the source of your energy, be aware of the centre of your life. And, if need be, awaken from the sleep of death.

This article is an excerpt from Old Words, Short Words, by Maxwell Ryan which is available at 806-5166 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, ON, L7L 1C3, Canada for $12 (Canadian).

Such people are known by their attitude and lifestyle of spiritual frivolity. That is, they are so biblically illiterate and so deaf to the Holy Spirit, that they cannot discern between good or evil.

They are more interested in the adornment of their pampered and over-fed bodies than they are in the adornment of their spirit.

They spend time and money on clothing for their person but never give a second thought to the garments of personal righteousness.

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toHow Justice

Asylum seekers – what is the truth?

not deter arrivals. In fact, in the period after TPVs were introduced in 1999 there was a huge surge of unauthorised boat arrivals. Figures show that in that period the percentage of women and children seeking asylum went from around 25 per cent to around 40 per cent, and we saw more women and children taking the very dangerous journey to Australia by boat (Phillips and Spinks, 2010).

The only way to stop unauthorised boat arrivals is through regional and international co-operation to resolve conflicts and to create durable solutions for refugees so that they no longer need to undertake perilous journeys to find safety (A Just Australia, 2010).

5. Boat people are not “queue jumpers,” and are not stealing the places of “genuine” refugees waiting patiently in camps for their turn at orderly processing

Often there is the view that asylum seekers, particularly those who arrive in Australia by boat, are “jumping the queue” and pushing out a more deserving person waiting in a refugee camp.

Unfortunately, the concept of an orderly queue is not reality for the asylum process. The truth is only a small proportion of asylum seekers are registered with the UNHCR (Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refuges) which estimates that less than 1 per cent of the world’s refugees may be resettled in any given year.

Many asylum seekers come from countries where there is no UNHCR office and no Australian embassy. In countries with a UNHCR office, a refugee might not physically be able to register because of curfews, road blocks or travel restrictions.

Sometimes, just expressing a need to leave is enough to put one’s life at risk (A Just Australia, 2010).

Where refugees are concerned, there is no “queue” at all for people who arrive on boats without visas. They are not considered under the same criteria

emphasises that a person who has a well-founded fear of persecution should be viewed as a refugee and not be labelled an “illegal immigrant” as the very nature of persecution means that their only means of escape may be via illegal entry and/or the use of false documentation.

Asylum seekers, regardless of their mode of arrival, are classified by Australian law to be “unlawful non-citizens”. However, the term “unlawful” does not mean that asylum seekers have committed a criminal offence.

The act of arriving in Australia and seeking of asylum is not a criminal offence under Australian law.

The confusion about legal status arises from the fact that those arriving by boat do so without a valid visa or any other appropriate authorisation, whereas most, though not all, who arrive by air and then seek asylum, usually enter on a valid visa.

Unfortunately, too often in the media we hear asylum seekers inaccurately labelled as “illegal” or not genuine, however, in reality once their claims have been heard 84 per cent are found to be refugees (A Just Australia, 2010).

3. Most asylum seekers arrive by air and not by boat

In Australia, the majority of asylum seekers applying for protection arrive by air. They often come with a valid visa and then apply for asylum at a later date.

Boat arrivals make up a very small percentage of applicants. It is estimated that 96 to 99 per cent of asylum applicants arrived by air, however, those who have arrived by boat are more likely to be recognised as refugees (Phillips, 2010).

4. Harsh policies against asylum seekers do not prevent people smugglers and unauthorised arrivals

It is unfair and illogical to punish asylum seekers in the hope of deterring people smugglers. Harsh policies such as temporary protection visas (TPVs) do

As Christians we advocate for social justice and in doing so, we need to ensure we are well informed. Here are six facts

everyone should know about asylum seekers:

1. There is a difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee

An asylum seeker is someone who is seeking international protection but their claim for refugee status has not yet been determined.

In contrast, a refugee is someone who has been recognised as a refugee under the 1951 Refugee Convention relating to the status of refugees.

The Convention defines a “refugee” as any person who: “... owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country; or who, not having a nationality and being outside the country of his former habitual residence as a result of such events, is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to return to it” (Phillips, 2010).

2. People who arrive unauthorised are “genuine” refugees. They are not illegal immigrants

Typically, “illegal immigrants” are people who enter a country without meeting the legal requirements for entry (without a valid visa). However, under Article 14 of the United Nations 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, everyone has the right to seek asylum and the 1951 Refugee Convention prohibits states from imposing penalties on those entering “illegally” who come directly from a territory where their life or freedom is threatened.

The UNHCR (Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees)

The issue of asylum seekers is a hot topic in Australian society but the facts are often misconstrued in the media. SONYA PELL and LUKE GEARY provide some important information to help Salvationists take a just approach to the issue

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This article is taken from the book 50 Ways To Do Justice which is published by Carpenter Media and available from Salvationist Supplies in Sydney (www.salvosuppliessyd.com) or The Salvation Army Australia Eastern Territory’s Justice Unit (www.justiceunit.com.au) for $7.50.

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Ways

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for issue of a visa in respect of any other person in the world. A refugee who arrives here on a boat cannot take the place of another kind of migrant.

Similarly, they cannot take the place of a refugee who is waiting to come to Australia from a refugee camp overseas.

The reason for this is that the Australian Government allocates visa places according to “classes” and “subclasses” of visas. The refugees who arrive here on boats are in a different “subclass” altogether to those refugees who are in camps overseas.

Therefore, there is no “queue” for the people who arrive here in boats to jump ... they are in a subclass of their own.

6. Australia is not being overwhelmed by asylum claims

Internationally, most asylum claims are lodged in Europe, the United States and Canada. In 2009, the largest number of asylum claims for an industrialised country occurred in the US with 49,000 claims, closely followed by France with 42,000 and Canada with 33,300.

Australia, by comparison, has a relatively small number. In 2009, Australia received 6170 asylum applications, just 1.6 per cent of the 377,160 applications received across 44 industrialised nations (Phillips and Spinks, 2010).

References:Phillips (2010), Asylum Seekers and Refugees

- What Are The Facts? Social Policy Section, Australian Parliamentary Library.Phillips and Spinks (2010), Boat Arrivals in Australia Since 1976: January 2010 Update, Australian Policy Online - http://www.apo.org.au/node/20344A Just Australia (2009), Asylum Seekers: Myths and Facts, Wednesday 28 October, 2009, the refugee advocacy group - A Just Australia.

Sonya Pell is a Salvationist who attends Auburn Corps in Sydney. She works for the Federal Court of Australia in international development and judicial reform. Luke Geary is a lawyer who coordinates the work of The Salvation Army’s Sydney-based Salvos Legal agency.

Psalm 131“I have stilled and quieted my soul; like a weaned child with its mother, like a weaned child is my soul within me” (v2, NIV).

For some people silence is a treasure; for others it is a torture. But whether you are Type A or Type Z personality, raving

extrovert or radical introvert, silence is an invitation.

The prophet Elijah stood by the mouth of a cave listening for God’s voice. He heard a powerful wind, felt a mighty earthquake, saw a raging fire. But God spoke to him through “a gentle whisper”, translated elsewhere as “the sound of crushed silence”.

The prophet pulled his cloak over his

face and went out to speak with God (1 Kings 19:12-13).

When the outer noises are silenced, the inner voice of God can be heard more clearly. As someone said: “When we open up space for God in silence, we take the teeth out of the busyness that would chew us up.” Brother Lawrence, busy in the monastery kitchen, called this “the practice of the presence of God”.

Author Dallas Willard says that “silence is frightening because it strips us as nothing else does, throwing us upon the stark realities of our life”. Even our best efforts cannot fill our infinite emptiness with finite things like noise, busyness or possessions.

I know a woman who goes on retreat for one week every year to be alone with God and to reflect prayerfully on her

journey with Jesus. She carries with her certain issues she needs to think about. But on her latest retreat she said she simply spread herself out under the loving gaze of God, the way a plant spreads out its leaves to the sun. She came home refreshed and found the issues she did not take with her had found their own resolution.

Author Henri Nouwen said: “Though we want to make all our time, time for God, we will never succeed if we do not reserve a minute, an hour, a morning, a day, a week, a month, or whatever period of time for God and him alone.”

To reflect on ...“We receive only when we are recollected; only in silence is heard the beating of the heart of God.”- Father Bernardo Olivera

with major barbara sampson

pipeline 06/2011 23

Page 24: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

Soul SurferRATING: MDISTRIBUTOR: SonyRELEASE DATE: 28 May

Though Soul Surfer opens in Hawaii, the scenery and lifestyle will have a

familiar feel for Australians who’ve grown up with a coastal culture. Our heroine Bethany’s introduction, “We spent more time wet than we did dry…” brought back many of my own beachside holidays. But it’s her trips to church and youth group that will remind others they’re visiting an unfamiliar world.

Soul Surfer is unashamedly Christian. The story opens with a brief introduction to the Hamilton family, headed by dad Tom (Dennis Quaid) and mum Cheri (Helen Hunt). Bethany, played by AnnaSophia Robb (pictured right), is part of a family that is passionate about surfing. She and her friend Alana are talented enough to earn a sponsorship with Rip Curl but a tragedy during an early morning session washes away her hopes of a place on the professional circuit. While surfing a reef with family friends she is attacked by a 4m tiger shark that severs her arm. What follows is a rocky recovery and an incredible tale of physical and spiritual triumph.

Soul Surfer is built around a true story and that anchor saves it from waves of the pop philosophy. The film gives a clear vision of what it’s like to be part of a community that doesn’t expect to be easy. As we enter Bethany’s church we hear the congregation singing about their God who gives and takes away, but “…My heart will always say, Lord blessed be your name”. A chorus is of course no real armour against the realities of a savage injury. Yet when Bethany struggles with her doubts in hospital, we see the benefit of raising children with a robust knowledge of God’s sufficiency:

Bethany: “When can I surf again?”Dad: “Are you busy right now?”Bethany: “Kinda.” Dad: “Soon.”Bethany: “How do you know?”

Dad: “Because you can do all things…”Bethany: “… through Him who strengthens me.”

Christians have been rightly criticised for offering comfortless “God’s will” responses to real pain. The strength of Soul Surfer’s response is that it sketches a different picture. In possibly one of the film’s weakest moments Bethany’s youth group leader tells her “… I have to believe something good will come of this,” leaving you with the distinct impression her faith depends on finding the upside to a thoroughly difficult situation. However, Helen Hunt’s Cheri is the first to raise the idea that God’s “good” doesn’t necessarily rest on returning Bethany to the water. When her daughter asks why she had to lose everything, Cheri responds, “You didn’t lose everything, not even close”. And when dad worries that Bethany will be lost without her waves, mum stops

him in his tracks: “If she believes life is all about surfing and she can’t have that she’s going to be really, really lost.”

That’s where Soul Surfer delivers the second most important lesson a Christian family can teach. It’s not enough to tell children that God is in control and he’s working for their good. Otherwise when terrors come we leave them with the image of either a powerless or a careless Creator.

We also need to convey that God’s good is much higher than ours. While we mess around at the beach, he works to draw us closer to him.

God knows that he is the best gift and the source of all good things. Our Father may in fact have to take many precious things out of our hands before we find room for him, but Bethany Hamilton and many others have found that once they learn to trust his judgment they discover “… the most important thing in the world – love, bigger than any tidal wave”.

24

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What would Jesus view?

Doctor Who – Series 6CHANNEL: ABC1TIME-SLOT: Sundays, 7.30pmRATING: PG

It’s hard to imagine you could pitch this idea to a modern television broadcaster

and get anywhere: an anti-violence, time-travelling alien with lots of female companions (but no physical relationships) whose favourite catch-phrase is “Bow ties are cool!” Yes, good luck with that one! Except that it also happens to be a fairly accurate description of the latest incarnation of Doctor Who.

This is the second series with Matt Smith playing the science-fiction hero who travels throughout time and space saving alien races and solving moral dilemmas. It’s also the 32nd series since The Doctor first strolled on to British television sets in 1963 – the science fiction equivalent of the never-say-die James Bond. But where 007 has always been about quick kills, fast cars and even faster girls, The Doctor has been more of a moral crusader.

Earlier Doctors championed ideas

of renewable energy and egalitarianism across all species. But if there is one “adventure” this Time Lord has consistently denied himself, it’s been the married life ... until now?

This latest series of Doctor Who spends a great deal of time elaborating on the relatively new character of River Song, played by Alex Kingston. The 10th Doctor (David Tennant) was the first to meet River when she appeared in an ancient library as a gun-toting archaeologist – a sort of female Indiana Jones. Since then we’ve learnt that she’s from the Doctor’s future, she habitually refers to him as “Sweetie” and “My Love”, and describes herself as someone who one day he would “trust completely”. River also happens to know the Doctor’s real name, and he admits that there is only “one time” he could ever have told her. To which she replies, “Shhh ... spoilers!”

Commenting on this series, character creator Steven Moffat says, “We’ll find out who she is and we might be very, very wrong in our presumptions”. But

when casting the role, the then-executive producer Russell Davies referred to the character as, “sort of the Doctor’s wife,” giving an indication of where the concept was headed. And even Moffatt admits he looked to the movie The Time Traveller’s Wife when conceiving her and the Doctor’s time-twisted relationship.

Amy, one of the Doctor’s companions, asks River if in fact she is his wife. River asks, “... if anything could be that simple with the Doctor?” – and in so doing begins to help viewers understand what marriage would look like to the most modern of modern men.

River is a headstrong, independent woman. She kisses the doctor with undisguised passion following one of their joint victories, packs a devastating blaster and says she would, “trust that man to the end of the universe,” but is not above contradicting or disobeying him at a moment’s notice.

The relationship she and the Doctor enjoy (or will one day enjoy?) is clearly beyond friends, but somehow less than the Bible’s idea of life-long partners. If she does turn out to be the closest thing to the Doctor’s wife then theirs will be a marriage that values the individual’s goals above any idea of personal submission.

The Doctor began life full of old-fashioned manners and morality in the face of problems that weekly threatened to destroy the universe. But his most recent incarnations have proceeded with a bachelor’s abandon for entertainment and exploration. This latest series contains an episode titled “The Doctor’s Wife”, but viewers eventually discover the woman the Doctor is seeking to rescue is in fact an incarnation of his beloved time machine, the TARDIS.

In short, the Doctor is married to his freedom. It’ll be interesting to see whether the writers turn back the clock to favour the Doctor’s intensely responsible streak, and transform him into the model husband, or whether his individuality will win out and we’ll see another relationship as paradoxical as time travel: two people entirely independent and yet still claiming to love each other.

Matt Smith (centre) plays Doctor Who in the latest series of the long-running TV show. The Doctor is joined by his latest companions Amy Pond (played by Karen Gillan) and Rory Williams (Arthur Darvill).

pipeline 06/2011 25

Page 26: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

Arming new soldiers for battle

MISSION PRIORITY 7 – SIGNIFICANT INCREASE OF NEW SOLDIERS AND OFFICERS

7 MISSION PRIORITIES1. A territory marked by prayer and

holiness

2. Our whole territory – in every place – involved in evangelism

3. Corps – healthy and multiplying

4. Our people equipped and empowered to serve the world

5. The territory passionate about bringing children to Jesus

6. Youth trained and sent out to frontline mission

7. Significant increase of new soldiers and officers

<— Transparent Logo

Passionate Parramatta Salvationist Margaret Poore has been given the task of encouraging ‘a significant increase in soldiers’ (MP7).

Margaret has been appointed soldiership representa-tive on the Territorial Mission Priorities Taskforce.

She is now seeking the support of at least two people in each of the territory’s seven divisions to assist with the effort.

Divisional Commanders have already been asked to suggest candidates for the think tank, who will participate in regular online forums, mission conferences and personal research of people within their own corps or centre.

Margaret says the online forums will also be open to anybody else with constructive suggestions. Recruiting Sergeants, especially, will be encouraged to be an integral part of the process.

“I see my role as talking up soldiership so that it becomes more intentional in the thinking of a corps,” she says. “It is a given that when a person is being considered for or is considering soldiership that conversion to Christ has happened and they are at the point where He is Lord of their life.

“So what then? Do we bring this person through to soldier-ship? I don’t think that we should be apologetic about soldiership. We should see soldiership as a life changing opportunity for a person to be encouraged to learn about, then be motivated by the mission that the Lord gave to our founder, William Booth. This God-given mission is compelling and still relevant today.

“As a soldier, we have an allegiance – a commission – that means we are more than a member.

“So the people we co-opt to help us need to be passionate about seeing new soldiers. They need

to be a praying people.”Margaret says the group

will look at a range of issues, including barriers to people

becoming soldiers. Barriers could include cost of uniform; The Salvation Army’s stand on drinking, smoking and gambling; and even the relevance of uniforms in a more sophis-ticated society and changing Army worship environment.

New soldiers will be offered up to $250 credit toward the cost of their first uniform.

The grant applies to soldiers enrolled after 2 April, 2011, and is for summer, winter or approved alternative uniforms.

It will not be available to existing soldiers.Territorial Secretary for Spiritual Life Development

Major Peter Farthing says approval of the grant is in line with the territory decision that the making of soldiers and officers would be a mission priority (MP7).

“We want to encourage people to enrol as soldiers,” he told Pipeline. “And we want them to witness to Christ and represent the Army by wearing uniform.

“But uniform can be expensive. So, we thought why not assist people with the cost. After all, the uniform is also publicity for the Army. When the public sees the uniform and our good work, they support us.”

Applications for grants will be available from corps officers. Approval letters will be provided for presentation to Salvationist Supplies.

Details of approved uniforms are listed in an official minute of the Australia Eastern Territory. Copies of the details are available from corps.

The official minute, under policy, explains that The Salvation Army uniform shows “who we are and whose we are”.

“It identifies the wearer with both The Salvation Army and Jesus Christ. It indicates purpose.”

$250 uniform grant

Margaret’s recruiting troops

Major Peter Farthing is the Australia Eastern Territory Secretary for Spiritual Life Development.

We must settle the purpose for uniform

What is Salvation Army uniform for? Are there any good reasons a soldier should wear it?Let us say, first of all, what the uniform is not for. The Army uniform is not club garb to identify

the insiders. The uniform was not invented to impose discipline on the troops. It is not smart wear for church. It is not a band uniform or clothing for collecting.

The uniform has much deeper meaning. Commissioner Israel Gaither said: “When a soldier puts on the uniform, it is not to identify with an institution or to join a corps section. It is not merely to belong. It is to witness to Christ and to our corporate purpose.”

There is an important story behind the uniform. For 13 years – from 1865 to 1878 – William Booth led The Christian Mission and, as an evangelistic force, the Mission did moderately well. Then it morphed into The Salvation Army – and took off.

Almost immediately, Salvationists began wearing uniforms. At first many invented their own. And for a long time uniform was adventurous and informal, as soldiers put on red jerseys or navy jackets. But, slowly, things were standardised.

When the Army took to the streets or invaded slums, the Salvationists went in uniform. When they started in new countries, they wore uniform. They proclaimed Jesus on the streets. They suffered great hardships. They were persecuted.

During international conflicts, some went to the front lines with the troops. In Christ’s name, Salvationists loved the lost and gave themselves to the poor. When emergencies struck, the uniform was there.

Gradually, The Salvation Army uniform and logos became known around the world. Today, the story continues. And, thanks to those who went before us, the Army uniform is respected from the highlands of Papua New Guinea to Wall Street, New York.

When you put on a Salvation Army uniform, you step into that continuing story. Every soldier gets to live the story.

Whenever I pass a homeless person on the street, I feel a responsibility – and a compassion – to at least speak with them, and perhaps buy a meal. That man is one of ‘our people’. I find that when he sees my uniform, he welcomes my concern. He knows who I am. He expects me to care. He understands we exist for him. For us Salvationists, there is no better experience than that.

Yes, we can wear the uniform on Sundays to meetings. It says we have signed up, we are serving, we are part of this bigger Salvation Army and all it represents. But perhaps more important, we can find places to wear it outside of meetings – in the community. We can wear it for mission.

Recently, I saw a photo taken in Hong Kong when the actor Jackie Chan organised a massive concert in aid of victims of

the Japanese tsunami. He directed all the money raised to The Salvation Army. And there, under a canvas roof, were 50 or more young Hong Kong Salvationists, in uniform or wearing t-shirts with our logo, on the phones taking donations. Their uniform was their work clothes for mission.

The Salvation Army uniform declares to the world three things:

1. I belong to Jesus Christ. General Paul Rader wrote: “The uniform speaks of our availability to the public to ‘give an answer for the hope that is in us’ and our eagerness to serve others in the name and spirit of Christ. Uniform also identifies us with The Salvation Army as a Christian Church and an agency for evangelism and social service’.”

2. I am here to serve. “Our uniform makes us visible and says we are available,” said General Clarence Wiseman. General Paul Rader added: “The message of our uniforms is ‘We are here for you’.” The uniform says I will be a person of compassion.

3. I belong to the world-wide Salvation Army. When you become a soldier, you enrol in something much bigger than your local Salvation Army church. You have brothers and sisters throughout Africa, South and North America, Asia, the Pacific, Europe and the Middle East. They all wear the same or similar uniforms, and are on the same mission.

Army leaders definitely want soldiers and officers wearing uniform. Sometimes it will be the more formal uniforms. Other times a t-shirt with a big red shield can work just fine. The style has to suit the occasion. There is room for youth to dress like youth when the situation is right. But the visible presence in communities is vital. Commissioner Norman Howe said: “God has called us to be a visible force... The important issue is that we maintain our visible presence.”

Let’s allow Commissioner Israel Gaither, former Chief of the Staff and second-in-command of the Army, to have the final word on uniform: “I worry about our adequacy in the present when we have soldiers who wear the uniform as a sign of pride in an institution as opposed to a witness of our corporate purpose...

We must settle the identity question. We are soldiers. We wear uniforms. And we fight against that which makes a person less than God intended.”

By Major Peter Farthing

“There will, naturally, be a wide range of views. For example, some people come from corps strong on soldiership; strong on tradition. Others come from new-style corps – like plants – that do not have that history. We need to hear all views; to get a snapshot of what is happening in all corps and centres.”

She will report the think tank’s findings to the territorial taskforce.

Margaret is the daughter of Southern Territory officers. She and husband Mike have been soldiers at Parramatta Corps since 1987. Margaret is currently coordinator of extended ministries at Parramatta.

26

Page 27: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

Arming new soldiers for battle

MISSION PRIORITY 7 – SIGNIFICANT INCREASE OF NEW SOLDIERS AND OFFICERS

7 MISSION PRIORITIES1. A territory marked by prayer and

holiness

2. Our whole territory – in every place – involved in evangelism

3. Corps – healthy and multiplying

4. Our people equipped and empowered to serve the world

5. The territory passionate about bringing children to Jesus

6. Youth trained and sent out to frontline mission

7. Significant increase of new soldiers and officers

<— Transparent Logo

Passionate Parramatta Salvationist Margaret Poore has been given the task of encouraging ‘a significant increase in soldiers’ (MP7).

Margaret has been appointed soldiership representa-tive on the Territorial Mission Priorities Taskforce.

She is now seeking the support of at least two people in each of the territory’s seven divisions to assist with the effort.

Divisional Commanders have already been asked to suggest candidates for the think tank, who will participate in regular online forums, mission conferences and personal research of people within their own corps or centre.

Margaret says the online forums will also be open to anybody else with constructive suggestions. Recruiting Sergeants, especially, will be encouraged to be an integral part of the process.

“I see my role as talking up soldiership so that it becomes more intentional in the thinking of a corps,” she says. “It is a given that when a person is being considered for or is considering soldiership that conversion to Christ has happened and they are at the point where He is Lord of their life.

“So what then? Do we bring this person through to soldier-ship? I don’t think that we should be apologetic about soldiership. We should see soldiership as a life changing opportunity for a person to be encouraged to learn about, then be motivated by the mission that the Lord gave to our founder, William Booth. This God-given mission is compelling and still relevant today.

“As a soldier, we have an allegiance – a commission – that means we are more than a member.

“So the people we co-opt to help us need to be passionate about seeing new soldiers. They need

to be a praying people.”Margaret says the group

will look at a range of issues, including barriers to people

becoming soldiers. Barriers could include cost of uniform; The Salvation Army’s stand on drinking, smoking and gambling; and even the relevance of uniforms in a more sophis-ticated society and changing Army worship environment.

New soldiers will be offered up to $250 credit toward the cost of their first uniform.

The grant applies to soldiers enrolled after 2 April, 2011, and is for summer, winter or approved alternative uniforms.

It will not be available to existing soldiers.Territorial Secretary for Spiritual Life Development

Major Peter Farthing says approval of the grant is in line with the territory decision that the making of soldiers and officers would be a mission priority (MP7).

“We want to encourage people to enrol as soldiers,” he told Pipeline. “And we want them to witness to Christ and represent the Army by wearing uniform.

“But uniform can be expensive. So, we thought why not assist people with the cost. After all, the uniform is also publicity for the Army. When the public sees the uniform and our good work, they support us.”

Applications for grants will be available from corps officers. Approval letters will be provided for presentation to Salvationist Supplies.

Details of approved uniforms are listed in an official minute of the Australia Eastern Territory. Copies of the details are available from corps.

The official minute, under policy, explains that The Salvation Army uniform shows “who we are and whose we are”.

“It identifies the wearer with both The Salvation Army and Jesus Christ. It indicates purpose.”

$250 uniform grant

Margaret’s recruiting troops

Major Peter Farthing is the Australia Eastern Territory Secretary for Spiritual Life Development.

We must settle the purpose for uniform

What is Salvation Army uniform for? Are there any good reasons a soldier should wear it?Let us say, first of all, what the uniform is not for. The Army uniform is not club garb to identify

the insiders. The uniform was not invented to impose discipline on the troops. It is not smart wear for church. It is not a band uniform or clothing for collecting.

The uniform has much deeper meaning. Commissioner Israel Gaither said: “When a soldier puts on the uniform, it is not to identify with an institution or to join a corps section. It is not merely to belong. It is to witness to Christ and to our corporate purpose.”

There is an important story behind the uniform. For 13 years – from 1865 to 1878 – William Booth led The Christian Mission and, as an evangelistic force, the Mission did moderately well. Then it morphed into The Salvation Army – and took off.

Almost immediately, Salvationists began wearing uniforms. At first many invented their own. And for a long time uniform was adventurous and informal, as soldiers put on red jerseys or navy jackets. But, slowly, things were standardised.

When the Army took to the streets or invaded slums, the Salvationists went in uniform. When they started in new countries, they wore uniform. They proclaimed Jesus on the streets. They suffered great hardships. They were persecuted.

During international conflicts, some went to the front lines with the troops. In Christ’s name, Salvationists loved the lost and gave themselves to the poor. When emergencies struck, the uniform was there.

Gradually, The Salvation Army uniform and logos became known around the world. Today, the story continues. And, thanks to those who went before us, the Army uniform is respected from the highlands of Papua New Guinea to Wall Street, New York.

When you put on a Salvation Army uniform, you step into that continuing story. Every soldier gets to live the story.

Whenever I pass a homeless person on the street, I feel a responsibility – and a compassion – to at least speak with them, and perhaps buy a meal. That man is one of ‘our people’. I find that when he sees my uniform, he welcomes my concern. He knows who I am. He expects me to care. He understands we exist for him. For us Salvationists, there is no better experience than that.

Yes, we can wear the uniform on Sundays to meetings. It says we have signed up, we are serving, we are part of this bigger Salvation Army and all it represents. But perhaps more important, we can find places to wear it outside of meetings – in the community. We can wear it for mission.

Recently, I saw a photo taken in Hong Kong when the actor Jackie Chan organised a massive concert in aid of victims of

the Japanese tsunami. He directed all the money raised to The Salvation Army. And there, under a canvas roof, were 50 or more young Hong Kong Salvationists, in uniform or wearing t-shirts with our logo, on the phones taking donations. Their uniform was their work clothes for mission.

The Salvation Army uniform declares to the world three things:

1. I belong to Jesus Christ. General Paul Rader wrote: “The uniform speaks of our availability to the public to ‘give an answer for the hope that is in us’ and our eagerness to serve others in the name and spirit of Christ. Uniform also identifies us with The Salvation Army as a Christian Church and an agency for evangelism and social service’.”

2. I am here to serve. “Our uniform makes us visible and says we are available,” said General Clarence Wiseman. General Paul Rader added: “The message of our uniforms is ‘We are here for you’.” The uniform says I will be a person of compassion.

3. I belong to the world-wide Salvation Army. When you become a soldier, you enrol in something much bigger than your local Salvation Army church. You have brothers and sisters throughout Africa, South and North America, Asia, the Pacific, Europe and the Middle East. They all wear the same or similar uniforms, and are on the same mission.

Army leaders definitely want soldiers and officers wearing uniform. Sometimes it will be the more formal uniforms. Other times a t-shirt with a big red shield can work just fine. The style has to suit the occasion. There is room for youth to dress like youth when the situation is right. But the visible presence in communities is vital. Commissioner Norman Howe said: “God has called us to be a visible force... The important issue is that we maintain our visible presence.”

Let’s allow Commissioner Israel Gaither, former Chief of the Staff and second-in-command of the Army, to have the final word on uniform: “I worry about our adequacy in the present when we have soldiers who wear the uniform as a sign of pride in an institution as opposed to a witness of our corporate purpose...

We must settle the identity question. We are soldiers. We wear uniforms. And we fight against that which makes a person less than God intended.”

By Major Peter Farthing

“There will, naturally, be a wide range of views. For example, some people come from corps strong on soldiership; strong on tradition. Others come from new-style corps – like plants – that do not have that history. We need to hear all views; to get a snapshot of what is happening in all corps and centres.”

She will report the think tank’s findings to the territorial taskforce.

Margaret is the daughter of Southern Territory officers. She and husband Mike have been soldiers at Parramatta Corps since 1987. Margaret is currently coordinator of extended ministries at Parramatta.

pipeline 06/2011 27

Page 28: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

LOCA L AND I NTER NAT IONA L NEwS

From t he c oa l f a c e

Salvos connect with homeless in BrisbaneThe Salvation Army joined forces with Brisbane City

Council and Volunteering Queensland to deliver the 10th annual Homeless Connect event, held at the Brisbane RNA Showgrounds on 11 May.

Homeless Connect co-ordinates businesses and community groups twice annually and provides free services to people who are homeless, at risk of homelessness or without secure accommodation.

Throughout the day, guests could access free medical care, accommodation referral, employment assistance, legal advice, haircuts, food and clothing. More than 6000 people have been assisted through Homeless Connect since it began in 2006.

Major Bryce Davies, The Salvation Army’s Brisbane Streetlevel Team Leader, and his 20-strong team of volunteers, sorted more than two truckloads of donated clothing and then gave it away to guests during the event. They also manned a toiletries “shop” and served coffee from the Streetlevel coffee van.

“Over 1200 attended the event and, while guests accessed all the services, our clothing venue was by far the most popular,” said Major Davies.

“We had a queue all day of around 50 people, and we moved much more clothing than we ever expected. Our Streetlevel volunteers put in a huge effort over two days and the fact that we had so many volunteers from a fairly small group says a lot.”

Ian Harrison, Area Manager for Brisbane Salvos Stores, worked with Major Davies to ensure a large supply of clothing was available for the event.

Streetlevel, Youth Outreach Services and Pindari Men’s Hostel also set up a mini-expo to showcase Salvation Army services available for the homeless in Brisbane.

“The free food and clothes attracted our guests to Homeless Connect and hopefully through access to our other services they can have some of their bigger issues addressed,” said Major Davies.

The guests’ response to Homeless Connect was positive and appreciative.

“They felt treated, recognised and given priority,” said Major Davies.

Brisbane City Council has asked The Salvation Army to continue partnering with it for the next Homeless Connect, to be held at the RNA Showgrounds, in November.

Major Bryce Davies (top) with volunteer helpers Noah and Rachael; visitors to Homeless Connect were able to access information about Salvation Army services. Photos: Troy Grice

Aged Care Plus announces new fellows programThe Salvation Army Aged Care Plus has announced its

support of a new fellows program.The Salvation Army Fellows Program will award fellowships

to individuals who have shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a capacity for self-direction. It is intended to encourage these people to pursue their own creative, intellectual, and professional inclinations to develop others and benefit the Army.

In keeping with this purpose, a foundation set up to administer the program, will award fellowships directly to individuals rather than through centres or programs. Recipients may use their fellowship to advance their expertise, engage in new work, or, if they wish, to change fields or alter the direction of their careers. Although nominees are reviewed for their achievements, the fellowship is both a reward for past

accomplishment and an investment in a person’s originality, insight, and potential.

Each fellowship comes with a payment of $5000 to cover the cost of courses, travel and living expenses.

Each year, The Salvation Army Fellows Program will invite applications which will be evaluated by a Salvation Army selection committee composed of representatives from Booth College, Human Resources and Aged Care Plus executives.

The chair of the committee will be the chief executive officer of Aged Care Plus.

An announcement listing successful applicants will usually be made in September.

While there are no quotas or limits, typically up to five fellows will be selected each year.

For more information email [email protected].

28

Page 29: Investing in a Brighter Tomorrow

LOCA L AND I NTER NAT IONA L NEwS

From t he c oa l f a c e

Almost three metres of water surged through The Salvation Army’s main citadel, youth hall and family

store at Bundamba during the devastating January floods in Queensland, causing massive damage and loss.

Undaunted, the Bundamba Corps tirelessly assisted the community throughout the months that followed, and are still heavily involved in providing relief assistance and counselling.

Anzac Day graphically illustrated the commitment and dedication of the corps, with officers and members being involved in 14 activities throughout the day.

“The day began at 4:15am, with the Bundamba Dawn Parade and Service, which sees the band marching in the dark from the citadel to Memorial Park,” said Bradley Strong, manager at the nearby Salvation Army Canaan School for Training and Development.

Flood-damaged corps continues to serve

The Bundamba Corps Band (above) took part in the Anzac Day service in the Memorial Park at Bundamba before joinging the timbrellists later in the day (top right) for the Anzac Day march down the main street of Ipswich.

This year, over 1000 people attended the service, with 300 returning to the youth hall for a “Gunfire” breakfast. The local Rotary Club assisted in the cooking.

“This was quite a challenge as our hall and kitchen are still out of action due to the floods,” said Bradley. “Memorial Park was also under water during the floods, with water rising to the feet of the Digger at the top of the Honour Stone.”

Since 1916, the Bundamba Corps has organised the Anzac Day service at Memorial Park, as there is no Returned and Services League (RSL) in the area. The corps is responsible for the running of the dawn and main services, as well as marches, for Bundamba.

Following the Bundamba Dawn Parade, the band and timbrellists travelled to Goodna for the main parade and service there, before returning for Bundamba’s main parade and service. They also combined with the Army’s Ipswich Corps for the main city parade there, and also gave support at Ebbw Vale, Redbank, Riverview, One Mile, North Ipswich and the Fiveways.

“Anzac Day and its observance continues to be a significant day for Australia, and Bundamba Corps believes that it is important for us to support the day, both practically through music, and also as a witness,” Bradley explained.

“Our involvement acknowledges the sacrifices made on our behalf, and we believe our ‘extra mile’ service on the day brings glory to God.”

Repairs to the Bundamba Citadel are expected to be completed in August.

Maitland Corps this year undertook a different approach at Easter. The corps decided not to hold an Easter Sunday

morning worship at the citadel, preferring to take the service to the local park.

Under the leadership of Lieutenants David and Tahlia Grounds, the corps planned a fun-filled morning of entertainment, music and preaching that was hoped would attract people who wouldn’t normally attend Maitland Corps. Flyers were distributed in the community advertising the service. Prayer for good weather was backed up by a lot of hard work, planning and effort by many of the corps sections leading up to the weekend.

Fine weather on the Sunday morning saw the park busy, with a free jumping castle and face painting for the kids, free drinks and sausage sandwiches being distributed, music provided by the Maitland City Corps band, corps info packs and Bibles being given away to visitors and all in a relaxed manner where people felt free to walk and talk among themselves.

A time of singing and worship followed where the Easter

Community hops in at Maitland

Some of the crowd which turned up for the Easter service in the park at Maitland.

message was presented to both the adults and children in a relaxed and easy setting, ending with more music from the band and an Easter egg hunt.

Overall the day was a huge success, measured by the dozen or so new families who attended.

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“It’s not every day you get a phone call from the Premier’s Office

asking if the Premier can attend one of your events,” said Divisional Envoy Max Moore, Cairns Corps and Far North Queensland Cluster Leader, with his wife, Envoy Meredith Moore.

On Thursday 14 April, the Department of the Premier and Cabinet, representing Queensland Premier Anna Bligh, called The Salvation Army office in Cairns to see whether the Premier could attend the launch of their Red Shield Appeal the following day. Of course, the answer was yes.

“We quickly arranged a place on the guest table for the Premier, although we didn’t have to arrange an escort for her,” said Envoy Max.

Ms Bligh had been visiting Far North Queensland to meet the Gulf and Savannah mayors whose towns had only that week began emerging from the floodwaters.

Major-General Mick Slater, leader of Queensland’s Flood Recovery Taskforce

Red Shield request from Premier

Queensland Premier Anna Bligh speaks at the Red Shield Appeal launch in Cairns.

who was guest speaker for the appeal launch, was travelling with the Premier.

“Both Major-General Slater and Premier Bligh spoke about how, in the reconstruction phase of the floods and cyclone, they were constantly coming across people who had been fed, cared for and followed up by The Salvation Army,” said Envoy Max.

“They really emphasised the fact that it was the Salvos on the ground there with the people who had been affected by the disaster, and how impressed they were with what they saw the Salvos doing.”

Major-General Slater used this point to encourage those attending the launch to give generously to the appeal.

“Post-flood and cyclone recovery is about rebuilding lives as much as infrastructure,” he said. “Don’t think about making a donation; think about investing in the stability of your community.”

After lunch, Premier Bligh spent time talking with those who had attended the launch.

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Long Jetty revels in double celebration It was the celebration of two milestones - a beginning and an

ending - at The Salvation Army’s Long Jetty Corps on Sunday, 15 May.

The retirement of Major Mavis Stevens was cause for celebration of her life and service. A graduate of the Army’s Sydney-based Bridge program, Mavis entered the training college in 1980 as part of the God’s Soldiers session.

Newcastle and Central Divisional Commander, Major Kerry Haggar, also a member of the God’s Soldiers intake, spoke briefly about her session-mate and her achievements. “When Mavis went to college there were those who doubted she would last the distance, but almost 30 years later we honour you for ‘lasting the distance’,” she said.

“You have a heart to serve and care for people with disabilities, to advocate for them and care for them and help them find hope and a future.”

Major Haggar also passed on greetings from another session-mate, Major Kevin McGrath, who recalled of Mavis: “I have strong memories of a very determined woman who had an encounter with Jesus, overcame numerous challenges and would let nothing get in her way as she lived her life for him.”

In closing, the Divisional Commander said: “I am sure that as you go from active officership to the ranks of the retired, the Lord will offer many opportunities for service that as yet are undreamed of. Thank you on behalf of the division for your faithful service.”

Territorial Commander Commissioner James Condon, who was on staff at the college for a year of Major Stevens’ training, conducted the retirement service.

“Major Mavis Stevens is a miracle of God’s grace and his transforming power,” he said.

“Despite her background and having to confront physical challenges throughout her officership, Mavis has persevered and always had a compassionate heart for those she served.

“Her service has been mainly in social and community services and her ministry has been marked by love for those less fortunate. She had a real understanding of people in her care because of her own background.”

The Territorial Commander then presented Major Stevens with her retirement certificate.

Commissioner Jan Condon offered a prayer of thanksgiving and then Major Stevens shared her testimony, acknowledging her brother and other family members present who had supported her, but most of all thanking God for her life and the opportunities she has had being a Salvation Army officer.

Also during the service, Commissioner Condon, conducting his first enrolment as Territorial Commander, enrolled Joshua Kingston as a Junior Soldier.

At just eight years old, Joshua said that he wanted to become a Junior Soldier so that he could learn more about how to follow Jesus, telling the Commissioner that when he grows up he wants to be a Salvation Army officer.

Commissioner Jan Condon prayed for Joshua and gave him the biblical promise from Joshua 1:9. She also referred to Joshua’s Salvation Army heritage – fifth generation on the Kingston side and sixth generation on the Walker side. Joshua’s grandmother, Rhondda Kingston, held The Salvation Army flag for the enrolment service.

Commissioner Condon reminded the congregation that although Major Stevens’ active service was coming to an end, her work would go on. There will be a new generation rising up to take her place, and Joshua Kingston represents that future.

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Major Mavis Stevens celebrates her retirement with (from left) Newcastle and Central Divisional Commander Major Kerry Haggar, Commissioner Jan Condon, and Commissioner James Condon.

Commissioner Jan Condon

pins a Junior Soldier badge

on Joshua Kingston during his

enrolment.

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Church becomes a messy affair at GladstoneMore than 80 people attended Easter Messy Church at the

Gladstone Corps of The Salvation Army on Sunday, 10 April, followed by an Easter Eggstravaganza.

Activities followed the Messy Church format: Chill (morning tea), create (crafts and activities relating to the Bible theme), celebrate (praise, worship and Bible lesson) and chomp (shared meal).

The Easter message was clearly explained using plastic resurrection eggs which were opened to reveal objects representing different parts of the Easter story.

“I took some ideas from Messy Church books, added my own, and wrapped it up with an application,” said Corps Officer Captain Sharilyn Bush, who serves in Gladstone with her husband, Captain Jeffrey Bush.

Captains Bush advertised Messy Church through the Family Store, Welfare Office and Mainly Music program.

“We normally get around 40 people attending on a Sunday, and we more than doubled that,” said Captain Sharilyn.

“It was also encouraging to see corps members embrace the opportunity to develop relationships with those who do not normally attend. Two families have already indicated that they would like their children to start Sunday school – praise God!”

Messy Church, popular in churches in the United Kingdom and Europe and growing in other places around the world, is a format that appeals to the unchurched and is family-focused, friendly, relational and creative in explaining the gospel.

“We have a vibrant Mainly Music program here and I was exploring ways to build a link between Mainly Music and church,” Captain Sharilyn explained.

“I read about Messy Church and thought that this format might be a way to do just that.

“We’ve only done Messy Church last Christmas and this Easter and are only in the early stages of introducing and implementing it. What’s interesting is that, although we targeted families, we’ve also had a lot of older folk come on those days, showing it’s a creative way of establishing an inter-generational church.

“We’d like to be doing Messy Church once a month, so we’re just looking at the times and days that might be appropriate.”

For more information and links go to www.messychurch.org.uk

All generations enjoyed the hands-on activities of Messy Church at Gladstone.

Man 2 Man breakfast kicks off new ministry

More than 40 men, aged from 16 to 90, gathered at the Gold Coast Temple Corps for the men’s ministry Man 2 Man

breakfast on Saturday, 16 April.Major Andrew McKeown, who took over as Corps Officer

at the Temple in January, was guest speaker for the breakfast. He shared some of his life’s experiences and challenges in a humorous and personal way with the men.

Men enjoy breakfast at Gold Coast Temple to launch a new ministry at the corps. Photo: Rodney Southall

“We wanted to get to know our new corps officer, and each other, better, as well as provide a relaxed atmosphere for fellowship,” said Cliff Worthing, men’s ministry co-ordinator.

“We also wanted to discuss the direction our men’s ministry should take and outline some of the activities we already have planned.”

Upcoming activities include a camping retreat, golf day, another breakfast, and watching major sporting events as a group.

“We also discussed ways we could actively reach out and serve the community more, as well as invite and involve men we know who could really benefit from the group,” said Cliff.

“There is a lot of interest in the ‘Men’s Shed’ concept and we are exploring that as well.”

Meantime, rain and gale-force winds didn’t deter 18 men from attending a recent Salvation Army men’s ministry “BBQ & Chat” evening in Cairns.

After food and fellowship, those present were challenged to share ways that men could engage in random acts of kindness in their daily lives. Some great examples were forthcoming as the men related how they had been blessed by a kindness shown. Others gave some practical ideas on expressing grace and mercy to others.

The men then received some “homework” - to identify someone local in need who they know, form a team of three or four and bless that person by cleaning up their yard, doing a few minor repairs or whatever it takes to make a difference in their lives.

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Family helps Edna celebrate 100th birthday By VICTORIA HOLLICK

Surrounded by family and friends, Edna Mayne celebrated her 100th birthday on Friday, 6 May.

The immaculate, warm and engaging 100-year-old has spent her life helping others. Now living at The Salvation Army Aged Care Plus Centre, Maybanke Hostel at Dulwich Hill, she looked back on a life full of joy and rapid change.

Edna, who has lived in and around the Leichhardt and Petersham areas of Sydney all her life, recalled as a small girl attending a tiny primary school in the back streets of Leichhardt and seeing bullock carts travelling up and down Marion Street.

As she reminisced about the old days, she spoke about attending the opening of the Petersham Salvation Army Hall in the 1920s and playing piano in the chapel.

Her father was, in fact, a bandmaster who encouraged his daughter’s musical skill. By her mid-teens Edna had become an accomplished musician playing both violin and piano. Throughout her life she regularly played during chapel services.

Reaching this milestone, Edna said her life has been immeasurably enriched by her faith in God, and by her involvement with The Salvation Army. She is described by all who know her as a generous spirit.

“My aunt was renowned A young Edna Mayne (left) with friend Edie Baskin at a Salvation Army event in Sydney in the 1930s.

for always inviting people home for a meal,” said her nephew, Major Peter Farthing.

“She was a woman whose door was always open to those in need. Her kindness and experience made her a valuable carer, even with fellow residents in aged care.”

For more than four decades, Edna served as secretary of the Petersham Home League, a grassroots organisation which offers support, fellowship and friendship to women of all backgrounds. She was dedicated to this voluntary position well into her 80s.

Edna is still a member of the Petersham Corps of The Salvation Army where she is the number one soldier on the corps roll.

Edna has two sons, Jon and Ron Mayne.

Lieutenant-Colonel Wal Greentree conducted the retirement service of Captains Mervyn and Maryann Dovey on Sunday,

3 April at North Brisbane Corps, in the presence of family and friends.

The Doveys, who have given 23 years of active service to The Salvation Army, were called to officership independently of each other during the 1984 “One Week’s Salary on Missionary Service” Sunday in Toowoomba.

Their service has included the following appointments:Overseas ServiceKuching Boys Home (Malaysia) 1986-1993 – Nine months as

Assistant Superintendents. Appointed Superintendents in 1987.Australia Eastern Territory ServiceSouth Queensland Division - Moonyah Recovery Services

Assistant Managers 1996-1999;Central and North Queensland Division – Managers

Centennial Lodge, Cairns 2000-2002; Bowen, Corps Officers 2003-2009; Longreach, Rural Chaplaincy and Corps Officers from January 2009 until 31 March 2011.

The retirement service for the Doveys was a real family affair. One daughter, Elissa Portillo, sang two songs, one of her own composition and the other an upbeat rendition of He Giveth More

Retirement tribute for DoveysGrace. Elissa’s husband, Juan, read the Scriptures. Mervyn and Maryann’s other daughter, Tracey, attended the meeting, and their son, Ashlyn, presented a family tribute.

Lieut-Colonel Wal Greentree presents Captains Mervyn and Maryann Dovey with their retirement certificates.

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Majors Barry and Pam Nancarrow lead The Salvation Army’s ministry to the Australian Defence Force.

The Army that serves on every frontThe Salvation Army Red Shield Defence

Services (RSDS), led by Majors Barry and Pam Nancarrow, has recently moved its national office from Canberra to the Gold Coast.

Major Barry Nancarrow, who serves as the RSDS Chief Commissioner, says the move will allow greater accessibility to the military, as well as place the national office in a location more central to their work.

“We are serving in areas around the country and the bulk of the Australian Army is north of the Queensland border,” he explained.

The RSDS has 27 representatives serving at 10 military bases across The Salvation Army’s two Australian territories (Eastern and Southern. They provide the Australian Defence Force with a Christian-based ministry of service in practical, emotional and moral terms wherever, and whenever, they are needed.

“We also support members and their families in any way that we can, and this is a growing area of our service,” said Major Nancarrow.

“In some areas we are going beyond military duties to meet needs, such as running a youth group on Friday nights and tutoring children from military families.”

For more information on the RSDS go to salvos.org.au/rsds

Prison chaplaincy service needs volunteersBy SIMONE WORTHING

The Salvation Army prison chaplaincy ministry is in urgent need of volunteers, particularly in Queensland.A number of recent retirements have led to the one-day-a-

week vacancies.“We have an extensive prison chaplaincy ministry

throughout our [Australia Eastern] territory and would love to hear from people who have a passion for reaching out to others and who think God is calling them in this direction,” said Major Bruce Robinson, the Army’s Queensland Coordinator for Courts and Prisons Chaplaincies.

The Salvation Army will provide all necessary training and support required for the voluntary positions.

The vacancies that urgently need to be filled are at Mareeba, Rockhampton, Maryborough, Palen Creek Prison Farm in Beaudesert, Townsville and the Darling Downs. Additional volunteers, though, are always welcome throughout the state.

Six groups provide chaplaincy services to Queensland prisons: The Salvation Army, Uniting Church, Anglican Church, Catholic Church, Prison Fellowship and Inside Out Chaplaincy.

“Each group provides a chaplain for one day each week, and Sunday is a rostered day for chapel services,” explained Major Robinson.

“This ensures that every day there is someone there who is available to talk to inmates, respond to their needs, and who will accept and care about them.

“Our responsibility is to provide pastoral care and to see them as fellow humans on a journey with a God who loves them.

“We are Salvation Army chaplains, but we are there as representatives of the Church, of Jesus.”

Some chaplains hold regular Bible studies with inmates, others visit people who have particular needs, and others follow up on special personal requests made by other chaplains, family and friends.

The chaplaincy service is looking for mature men and women aged over 18 with a passion for this ministry. Successful applicants will need to undergo training and induction, as well as a police check.

The Department of Corrective Services needs to approve each applicant.

“The process can take several months, but in the meantime applicants can go on visits with other chaplains and learn from them,” said Major Robinson.

If you are interested in applying for prison chaplaincy work, or would like further information, please contact Major Robinson on 0408 492 431.

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ENROLMENTS

Townsville Riverway Recovery MissionThe Salvation Army Australia Eastern Territory Chief

Secretary, Colonel Wayne Maxwell, enrolled six new Senior Soldiers at the Townsville Riverway Recovery Mission (TRRM) in late April. The new soldiers are Pat Brook, Tony Piper, Carolyn Philipson, Callum Harmer, Shirli Congoo and Leigh Mottram. “I am delighted to say that each new soldier is directly involved in ministry emanating out of our mission and they each take seriously their commitment to using their skills and talents in the service of God,” said Major Bruce Harmer, TRRM Manager.

Colonel Robyn Maxwell, Territorial Secretary for Women’s

The new soldiers (far left) at Townsville with Colonels Wayne and Robyn Maxwell, Majors Bruce and Carolyn Harmer, and Cadet Katherine Mills. (Left) Colonel Robyn Maxwell prays for new Adherent Fiona Shaw.

Ministries, also enrolled Fiona Shaw as an Adherent. “Fiona is actively involved in our worship band and also helps with youth ministries on Sundays whenever possible,” said Major Harmer. “We thank God for Fiona and her family and all that they bring to our mission and their fellow man.”

More than 250 people attended the service.

Tweed Heads Corps

After many years attending The Salvation Army Tweed Heads Corps, Ian and Marion Dooley were enrolled last

month as Senior Soldiers. The Dooleys believe that God has called them to be more intentional and visible witnesses for him through their soldiership, and they are excited about taking Jesus to people and meeting needs in his name. Pictured (left to right) are Ian Dooley, Marion Dooley, Alan Griffin (holding flag), and Captain Alwyn Robinson (Corps Officer).

Gympie Corps A near-capacity congregation witnessed the recent enrolment

of three new Senior Soldiers at Gympie. Each of the new soldiers commented on their commitment: “Soldiership will give me a sense of belonging,” said Chris Adams; “Wearing the Army uniform will help me to win my friends for Christ,” said Damien Adams; and Betty Edwards testified that Christ had made an incredible difference in her life and that becoming a soldier was her grateful response to him. Pictured (left to right) are Chris Adams, Damien Adams, Major Peter Maynard, Betty Edwards, and Gordon Adams is the flag bearer.

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Focus on Jesus at welcome of new General

General John Larsson (ret) encourages General Linda Bond following his dedicatory prayer for her during the welcome and dedication service in London. Photo: Paul Harmer

By Lieut-ColonelLAURIE ROBERTSON

It was the welcome and dedication meeting for General Linda Bond, but the focus throughout was on Jesus

Christ. From the opening song, led by the Chief of the Staff Commissioner Barry Swanson, to the closing prayer from Commissioner Freda Larsson, Jesus was lifted up.

On Sunday 17 April, the Lancaster Hotel London conference room became a place of praise, prayer, challenge and inspiration as the General urged Salvationists to accept the flow of God’s grace that leads to freedom from bondage, and to take hold of the fullness of power offered by the Holy Spirit.

She passionately stated that “we must not be content to play at being Army. It cannot be business as usual. What corps doesn’t want revival? What corps doesn’t want to be free of bondage and division? What corps doesn’t want the Spirit of unity or the gifts of the Spirit?”

Declaring war on mediocrity within the Army’s ranks, she asked, “who would not want the fullness of power of the Holy Spirit and who would want to be a mediocre Christian? Mediocrity is a sin for us. We cannot be content with mediocrity in our Christian living when the fullness of Jesus’ power is available through the Holy Spirit.”

Following the General’s message the mercy seat was quickly filled to overflowing as people responded to her call for everyone to drink of the living water of Jesus - the Holy Spirit.

Earlier in the meeting, when outlining her vision for the Army to be Spirit-filled, relevant, united and moving forward, taking the message of Jesus Christ to a hurting world, General Bond emphatically proclaimed her allegiance to him.

“I want to spend all my time as General standing for Jesus Christ. I never want to be ashamed of Jesus and I want The Salvation Army to always stand for Christ,” she said.

As the General challenged Salvationists worldwide to reach out to the lost and hurting, she affirmed that the Army had been given as a gift to the whole world.

“We were never made to stay within four walls. We must move out to change the world with the transforming message of Jesus,” she said.

This vision was echoed by Cadet Christianne Zünd when she represented all Salvationists in welcoming General Bond.

“As Salvationists all over the world have followed your election and read your inspiring testimony in Salvation Army papers, it has become evident that you are absolutely committed to living a life of praise, thanksgiving, obedience and trust in our Lord Jesus Christ,” she said. “You are passionate about Jesus, Salvation Army mission, teaching,

prayer, holiness and serving people. We love that.”

During a moving moment of dedication for General Bond, retired General John Larsson said that there is no installation ceremony for a General as “that is the privilege of the High Council - but ours is the privilege of sharing in this moment of dedication”.

He then prayed, thanking God for raising up and sustaining The Salvation Army and for calling and preparing, in every generation, the leaders the Army needs.

Scripture was significantly used throughout the meeting with the Chief of the Staff reading from Hebrews 12, the World President of Women’s Ministries Commissioner Sue Swanson presenting John 7:37-44 and Cadet Zünd quoting Romans 1:8 and from Psalm 119.

The International Staff Songsters and the International Staff Band provided music support, four delegates from the current session of the International College for Officers prayed and Major Daniel Dasari was the Army flag bearer.

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A concert broadcast live on television in Hong Kong has raised more than

$3 million for The Salvation Army’s earthquake and tsunami response programme in Japan.

The three-hour concert was organised by international film star Jackie Chan and featured artists well known in Hong Kong and around the world, including American singer Lionel Richie who performed from Australia via satellite link.

“For years my Japanese fans have made a great effort to raise money for my charity, to build schools in China and to help the victims of the [2008] Sichuan earthquake,” said Hong Kong-born Chan when asked why he arranged the concert. “It’s time for me to return the favour and do what we can to help.”

All profits from the concert have been passed on to The Salvation Army. More than 300 Salvationists and Salvation Army staff from its Hong Kong and Macau Command took telephone donations during the event.

Hong Kong concert raises millions for Japan

Actor Jackie Chan takes part in the concert to raise funds for Japan.

Army responds to US tornado devastationSalvation Army Emergency Disaster

Services (EDS) personnel continue to meet material, emotional, and spiritual needs across the southern United States, where tornadoes and storms have caused destruction on a scale not seen for nearly a century.

More than 350 people were killed in the storms in April, including at least 250 in the state of Alabama. Salvation Army EDS crews have also been working in Mississippi, Arkansas, Georgia, Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky.

Since the tornado season began, The Salvation Army has served 86,000 hot meals and distributed 260,000 sandwiches as well as providing spiritual and physical support to thousands of suffering people. An increasing number of people have been seeking prayer and physical support.

“When someone has lost everything, what they need most is hope. What better hope to provide than the healing power of prayer,” said volunteer Karen Diliberto.

One of the places battered by the storms was Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where more than 40 people were killed by a tornado that tore through the city. The emergency response in Tuscaloosa had to be coordinated from a site at the airport

because The Salvation Army’s properties in the city were destroyed.

“’There were 30 of us huddled in the [Salvation Army] administrative building when the tornado passed over us. But we had a miracle happen here because the building was destroyed but the only injury we had was one bruised thumb,” said Major Cherry Crowder.

Connie Pulam, a resident of nearby Pratt City, has been receiving help from The Salvation Army.

Connie and her husband, both Christians, had fled their house just before it was destroyed by a tornado.

“Something told me – I imagine the Holy Spirit – to get out of there, so we got in the car and took off,” she said.

“It’s a blessing to have The Salvation Army here. It’s just a comfort to know they care.”

* As Pipeline went to print, The Salvation Army was providing relief to storm survivors in Joplin, Missouri and other tornado-devastated communities throughout the central United States.

The tornado, which struck on 22 May, cut a path 10km long and almost 1km wide through the city of Joplin. At least 116 people had been confirmed dead with more than 1000 still unaccounted for.

Salvationists in Spain have been responding to the earthquake that hit

Lorca, Murcia, on 11 May. The 5.1-magnitude quake, combined

with an earlier 4.4-magnitude tremor, killed nine people and caused damage to 80 per cent of the town’s buildings.

The nearest Salvation Army corps is in Alicante, which is more than 120km away. The officers based in Alicante, husband-and-wife Lieutenant Luigi Muedas and Captain Jenniffer Beltrán, travelled to Lorca to assess how the Army can help.

They reported that many people were sleeping in tents put up by the Spanish military but that some, including families with small children, were spending the night in the open. Others were sleeping in their cars.

“The city looked like there had been a war; there were fallen walls, military and firefighters everywhere. We have seen the faces of desolate people and a lot of tears,” said Lieut Muedas.

The Army has been involved in providing food, hot drinks, blankets, shelter and other basic neccessities.

Officers assess need in earthquake-hit Spain

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Keith continued conducting chapel at Riverview Gardens aged care facility, did chaplaincy work at the Ipswich hospital and visitation of both Ipswich hospitals where the doors were always open to him. This he did for 20 years before ill health prevented him from continuing. The underlying theme of the tributes that have poured in from those who knew him was that Keith will be remembered as a gentle, humble servant of God.

Exemplary life

Walter Henry Bull was promoted to glory

on 22 April, aged 87. A funeral service was held at Port Macquarie Salvation Army, led by Major Brett Gallagher.

Walter was a third-generation Salvationist, the eldest of nine children born to Walter and Alma Bull on 12 December, 1923.

He was educated at Tighes Hill School and then later at Central High School at Broadmeadow. During this time, he played in the school band. After leaving school, the music teacher would often get him to come back and play the bass at special functions.

Growing up in the ranks of the Army’s Tighes Hill Corps, Walter became a Junior Soldier, Corps Cadet, Senior Soldier, bandsman and songster. He played cornet, euphonium, trombone and bass. Walter’s brother, Alan, said he excelled on the euphonium.

During the war years, Walter worked at Commonwealth Steel at Waratah making military helmets, having been rejected for military service because of his asthma.

In 1944, he received the call to officership and, aged 21, he entered The Salvation Army Training College in Sydney from Tighes Hill Corps, as part of the Liberator session.

Walter’s first appointment was to Foster Street Men’s Hostel. While there, atmospheric conditions aggravated his asthma and he was transferred to Indooroopilly Boys Home in Queensland. His health further deteriorated to the extent that he was forced to resign from officership.

Doctors advised that he move away from the coast to a drier climate. After a period of convalescence he went to live in Orange where he worked delivering bread.

On his return to Newcastle, Walter purchased a truck then went to Gunnedah wheat carting. Later, he had a tipper body fitted to carry coal and gravel.

It was while working in Kempsey that he met Olive Merle Spicer, and they were

Quiet wisdom

Major Karl Banks was promoted to glory on

1 April, aged 83.Karl Banks was born

on 8 May, 1927, at Rye Park near Yass. After making a decision at the Easter tent

meeting in Sydney in 1950, he returned with renewed commitment to the Rye Park Methodist Church. However, God spoke clearly to this shearer: “I want you to be a Salvation Army officer.”

With the help and care of then Captain Peggy Stephens, he entered the Ambassadors session of cadets in 1951, having been enrolled as a Senior Soldier on 26 January.

Karl was appointed as assistant at Beaudesert, and as corps officer at Windsor.

After marrying Lieutenant Elva White at Marrickville in 1953, they were appointed to Quirindi, Uralla and Dorrigo corps, Chittaway Point Farm for Court Boys, Merewether, Port Kembla, Grafton, Canowindra, Tighes Hill, Toongabbie, Dee Why and Rockdale corps. A divisional appointment followed and then to Correctional Services, and as travel officer at Territorial Headquarters from which Karl retired.

Many have been impacted by the quiet wisdom and solid faith of Karl. In retirement, Elva and he maintained their connection with Rockdale Corps, even after moving to Glenmore Park where they were also involved in the ministry of Penrith Corps. As Karl’s health declined, Elva’s service became focused on her husband, whom she cared for as they both continued to encourage others.

The Committal and Celebration services were conducted by Commissioner Les Strong. Captain Scott Allen (former Corps Officer at Penrith) prayed, and Major Graeme Ross (son-in-law) read Psalm 23 at the Committal Service.

At the Celebration Service at Rockdale, the theme of thanksgiving was set with the singing of O What a Wonderful Day celebrating the gift of eternal life. Captain Phil Gluyas (Penrith Corps Officer) prayed and Captain Clayton Spence (Rockdale Corps Officer) read Ephesians 3:14-21. Major Karan Ross (daughter) brought a family tribute, and the grandchildren also brought a tribute to their beloved grandfather. Lieut-Colonel Peggy Stephens, who first enrolled Karl as a Senior Soldier, brought the officer tribute, and Commissioner Jan Condon, who spoke of her own memories of her former corps officer from Uralla, read a tribute from Commissioner James Condon (Territorial Commander).

Karl is survived by his wife Elva, his two children; Karan with her husband Graeme, and their children Emma and her husband Scott, Adam and his wife Sian, and Leah; and Philip with his wife Julie and their children Jordan, Isaac, and Gabrielle.

Well done, good and faithful servant.

Model of perserverence

Major Keith Hunter passed into the

presence of the Lord whom he loved and served, on 12 April. The hall at Centenary Salvation Army was filled for a Thanksgiving Service

led by Colonel Wayne Maxwell. Keith’s sons Bill and Rodney each paid tribute to a loving, humble and dedicated father. Daughter Roslyn spoke of her Dad’s ability to communicate with people irrespective of class, race or creed. He was a champion for the underdog. Son Stuart read from the Scriptures. Jarryd, representing the grandchildren, spoke of how his Pop was a great influence on his life.

Tributes were read from Commissioner James Condon (Territorial Commander) and Commissioner Earl Maxwell.

Bandsmen from neighbouring corps accompanied the singing and the male voices blessed the congregation with their harmonious rendition of It is Well With My Soul. Lieutenant Tammy Rees (Centenary Corps Officer) prayed a very appropriate prayer.

Keith Harold Hunter was born in Brisbane on 21 August, 1927. He was an identical twin – his brother Bill was promoted to glory at the age of 25 while serving as a Salvation Army officer at Atherton in Queensland.

Keith entered the Salvation Army Training College in 1947, was commissioned as an officer in 1948, and served as an active full-time officer for 40 years, retiring from Bundamba in 1988. He married Lieutenant Margaret George, of Leeton, and they were blessed with four children.

Keith could testify that his greatest asset was perseverance. He felt that this ability to persevere kept him going through the demands of officership and at times when the going was hard and his faith tested.

He proved that the grace of God was sufficient in every situation, and God’s promise was real to him – “Fear thou not, for I am with thee; be not dismayed, for I am thy God; I will strengthen thee: yea, I will help thee; I will uphold thee with the right hand of my righteousness.”

After retiring from active officership,

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Christ. Her burial service was conducted by Captain Greg Saunders. Thelma’s husband Les and children – Robert, Bruce, and Catherine – are remembered in prayer.

Constant in prayer

Enid Gough was promoted to glory on

3 August, 2010, aged 90. A Thanksgiving Service celebrating her life was held at Gosford Corps on 9 August conducted by

Major Joy Harvey, Chaplain at Woodport Retirement Village where Enid spent her last days. Major Ken Harvey read the Bible, and Major David Palmer (Gosford Corps Officer) prayed.

Enid attended Belmore Corps until she met her husband-to-be, bandsman Jim Gough. After they married, they transferred to Campsie Corps where she served faithfully. Enid was involved in songsters, Torchbearers, Home League and Ladies Evening Fellowship.

Throughout the years, Enid faithfully supported her husband, daughter Colleen and son Ken in their service at the corps. She worshipped at Campsie for more than 60 years until ill health dictated that they move into Woodport Nursing Home at Erina, near their family.

At Enid’s service, Colleen gave a tribute on behalf of Jim, herself and her husband Bill, and brother Ken (deceased).

Adam Bradford, Enid’s grand-daughter’s husband, read a tribute on behalf of grandchildren Vanessa Bradford and Bradley Eirth, and himself. Desmond Pearse paid a tribute on behalf of Campsie Corps.

Enid was a lovely Christian lady who loved her Lord and her family and constantly prayed for them. She will be remembered with love and respect by all.

Dedicated soldier

James William Gough was promoted to glory

on 10 February, six months after the death of his loving wife Enid to whom he was totally devoted.

In 1942, James and Enid had their names added to Campsie Corps roll. Throughout their long association there, Jim held various positions in the corps: Deputy Bandmaster for approximately 30 years and Bandmaster for more than four years, as well as Songster Leader, Band Sergeant, and Assistant Corps Sergeant Major.

Jim was known for his cornet playing and featured playing solos locally

married at Tighes Hill Salvation Army on 31 March, 1951. Living in Newcastle, they were blessed with three children – Walter, Gregory and Jennifer.

Moving to Tamworth, Walter began selling life insurance where he took every opportunity to speak to people about the love of God, testifying to the saving grace of the Lord in his own life and what God could do in their lives. He was also a member of the Gideons Bible Society.

Upon retirement, Walter and Olive moved back to Kempsey to be closer to their children. It was here that Walter did Meals on Wheels and street ministry as well as holding the position of bandmaster at both Kempsey and Tamworth.

In the last three years, Walter and Olive moved to Wauchope to be near their daughter. During this time, Walter’s health had been in slow decline.

Walter served God at the Tighes Hill, Adamstown, Orange, Tamworth, Kempsey, Wauchope and Port Macquarie corps’ of The Salvation Army. He lived an exemplary life that has been honouring and pleasing to God.

Prayer warrior

Captains Greg and Karen Saunders

conducted the funeral at Orange Corps of Thelma Joan Sweeting, who was promoted to glory suddenly on 18 March,

aged 81, while visiting her sick husband, Les, in hospital.

Thelma first came to the Orange Corps in 1960 with her then-husband, and later linked up with a local church. She had been a Corps Cadet and Senior Soldier at Ryde Corps in Sydney prior to moving to Orange. After her second marriage, Thelma was re-enrolled as a Senior Soldier on 24 April, 2005, by Major Max Smith, and immediately joined in with community care work, visiting nursing homes and attending Bible Study groups.

Thelma was a great benefit to the Orange Corps through her ministry as a warrior of prayer.

Thelma was a well-known and respected citizen in Orange, and was involved with many groups. This was shown by the large crowd which attended her funeral service. The citadel at Orange had standing room only, and there were many spontaneous and sincere voluntary tributes made to the influence she had on people’s lives.

The focus of the Thanksgiving Service was “Blessed assurance, Jesus is mine”, testifying to Thelma’s deep faith and confidence in her Lord and Saviour, Jesus

and interstate. He loved his banding experience. It was fitting that Jim, born on Anzac Day (25 April) in 1919, was official bugler for Campsie RSL for 50 years.

Jim was always supported by his loving wife Enid, daughter Colleen and son Ken. Jim and Enid enjoyed 67 years of wedded bliss. He worshipped at Campsie Corps for more than 60 years until health concerns prompted him to move to Woodport Nursing Home at Erina to be near his family.

The Thanksgiving Service celebrating Jim’s life was held at Gosford Corps and conducted by Major David Palmer (Corps Officer). A tribute was shared by Colleen on behalf of herself and her husband Bill, and brother Ken (deceased). Adam Bradford, husband of Jim’s grand-daughter, paid tribute on behalf of himself and the grandchildren – Vanessa Bradford and Bradley Eirth. Desmond Pearse gave a tribute on behalf of Campsie Corps.

Jim loved his wife Enid, daughter Colleen and son Ken, along with the extended family. He was a Christian man who was a faithful servant to his Lord.

Faithful service

Margaret Douglass was promoted to glory on 10 February, aged 79, while

a resident at Wontama Uniting Church Hostel.

A funeral service was led by Chaplain Alan McAnulty, during which Margaret’s favourite hymns were sung. Her daughter, Libbie Douglass, gave a family tribute.

Margaret was enrolled as a Senior Soldier at Orange Corps by Major Bruce Buckmaster on 14 February, 1988, where she served faithfully until she moved to Merimbula, working in street ministry and visitation.

She then returned to Orange because of ill health.

Margaret attended Salvation Army meetings for a time until her passing.

A Thanksgiving Celebration of her life was led by Captains Greg and Karen Saunders at the Orange Corps. Carolyn Clarke spoke on behalf of the corps, mentioning Margaret’s friendliness and constant love for God.

Olive Griffin also spoke of Margaret’s love for God and her steadiness to help and pray.

Her warm smile and welcome manner will be remembered.

Please email Promoted To Glory reports and, if possible, a photograph to Pipeline at [email protected]. Please limit reports to no more than 400 words.

pROMOTED TO GLORY

LOCA L AND I NTER NAT IONA L NEwS

From t he c oa l f a c e

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LOCA L AND I NTER NAT IONA L NEwS

From t he c oa l f a c e

12-18 JuneRwanda and Burundi Region; Kalbar Corps, Lake Community Church, both Qld; Kempsey Corps, Lake Cargellico Rural Mission, Leeton Corps, all NSW; Social Justice Working Party (14-15), Visit of Pasadena Tabernacle Songsters (15-21), Youth Ministry Conference (17-19).

19-25 JuneGhana Territory; Legal Department, THQ; Life Community Church, Lockyer Valley Corps, Logan City Community Welfare Centre, all Qld; Lismore Corps, Lithgow Corps, both NSW; Candidates Sunday (19); Newcastle and Central NSW Division Officers Fellowship (20-23); Indigenous Working Party (23-24); Newcastle and Central NSW Division Headquarters Retreat (24-26).

26 June – 2 JulyLong Jetty Corps, Maclean Corps, Macquarie Fields Mission, all NSW; Longreach Corps/Rural Chaplaincy Base, Mackay Corps, Mackay Northern Beaches Mission, all Qld; Five Year Review – Collaroy (27-30); Founders Day (2); Queensland Performing Arts Camp (2-9); Indigenous Appeal Sunday (3).

3-9 JulyMacquarie Lodge Aged Care Services, Maitland City Corps, Manly Corps, Maroubra Corps, Eastern Suburbs Community Welfare Centre, Menai Corps, all NSW; Maroochydore Corps, Maryborough Corps, both Qld.

engagement calendar

Commissioners James Condon (Territorial Commander) and Jan Condon Sydney: Wed 1 June – National Council of Churches Executive MeetingTHQ: Thu 2 June – National Council of Churches Executive MeetingTHQ: Mon 6 June – Inter-Territorial ConsultationNorth Bexley: Wed 8 June – Officer Recruitment “Day Apart”#North Bexley: Thu 16 June – Women’s Ministry Seminar School for Officer TrainingPort Hacking: Sat 18 June – Youth Ministry Conference Sydney: Mon 20 June – Pasadena SongstersSydney: Wed 22 June – Sydney Media Advisory CommitteeTHQ: Wed 29 June – Orientation Day new Employees; Collaroy: Wed 29 June – Five year review dinnerTHQ: Thu 30 June – Service Recognition

#Commissioner Jan Condon only

Colonels Wayne (Chief Secretary) and Robyn MaxwellNorth Bexley: Thu 2 June – Leadership LectureTHQ: Mon 6 June – Inter-Territorial ConsultationMaitland: Sun 12 June – Corps visit#North Bexley: Thu 16 June – Women’s Ministry Seminar School for Officer TrainingPort Hacking: Sat 18 June – Youth Ministry ConferenceCollaroy: Wed 29 June – Five year review dinner

#Colonel Robyn Maxwell only

about people

AppointmentsEffective 9 May: Major Julie Radburn, Australia Eastern Territory Flood/Disaster Relief, Queensland Pro tem.Effective 16 May: Major Susan Reese, Territorial Consultant for Chaplaincy with additional responsibility as Chaplain to Salvos Legal, Territorial Mission and Resource Team. Effective 23 May: Major Sue Hopper, Community Support Worker (Flood Relief), South Queensland Division.Effective 30 June: Captain Emma and Lieutenant Matthew Moore>b>, Corps Officers, Tarrawanna Corps, Sydney East and Illawarra Division.

International AppointmentsEffective 1 July: Captain Zane Haupt, Territorial Youth and Candidates Secretary, Singapore, Malaysia and Myanmar Territory.

BereavedMajor Phillip McLaren of his uncle Gordon McLaren on 20 April; Captain Grant Sandercock-Brown of his grandmother, Nellie Dee on 12 May.

Promoted to GloryMajor Keith Hunter on 12 April; Lieutenant Jonathan Dent on 21 April; Brigadier Dorothy Moran on 6 May. Major Ron Weaver on 18 May.

RetirementsEnvoy John Mallows on 15 May; Major Mavis Stevens on 15 May. ResignationsMajors Peter and Wendy Staines on 6 February; Captains Justin and Lindy Davies on 2 April.

SAGALA AwardsThe following person has received the Commissioner’s Challenge Award: Brandon Blythe, Palm Beach Elanora Corps.

International College for Officers The following people will be delegates to the International College for Officers in 2011:Major Romona Kinder, July–September Session 210; Major Cheralynne Pethybridge, October–December Session 211.

time to pray

29 May – 4 JuneMajor Mark Watts, International Headquarters; Illawarra Community Welfare Centre, NSW; Inala Community Welfare Centre, Inala Corps, Inner City West Mission, all Qld; Information Technology Department, THQ; South Queensland Division Kids Camp (3-5).

5-11 JuneInner West Aged Care Services, Inverell Corps, Job Link, all NSW; Internal Audit Department, THQ; Ipswich Community Welfare Centre, Ipswich Corps, both Qld; Pentecost (12).