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Chalmer's edition of Jataka tales, originally published in 1895, vol 2.

TRANSCRIPT

TBI

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QfarnBll Itttocraitg IGihrary

CHARLES WILLIAM WASONCOLLECTIONCHINA AND THE CHINESE

THE GIFT OF

CHARLES WILLIAM WASONCLASS OF 18761918

The

datp shows

when

this

volume

\"as 'Fike^.

CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

3

1924 072 231 081

DATE DUE

Cornell University Library

Thetine

original of

tiiis

book

is in

Cornell University Library.

There are no known copyright

restrictions intext.

the United States on the use of the

http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924072231081

THE JATAKAOK

STORIES OF THE BUDDHA'S FORMER BIRTHS

JLonHon: C. J. CLAY AND SONS, CAMBBIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS WAREHOUSE, AYE MARIA LANE.iBteBSofa:263,

ARGTLE STREET.

ULtipjia:i^eto lotit:

F. A.

BROOKHACS.

aSomiaj:

MACMILLAN AND CO. G. BELL AND SONS.

SCENF

FROM

THE

STUPA

OF

BHARHUT

IILUSIRATING2).

JATAKA

266

(from Cuimiiij^ham, IM. xxv,

:

THE JATAKAOR

STORIES OF THE BUDDHA'S

FORMER BIRTHS.

TRANSLATED FROM THE PALI BY VARIOUS HANDS

UNDER THE EDITORSHIP OP

PROFESSOR

E.

B.

COWELL.

VOL.

M.

TRANSLATED BY

W. H.

D.

ROUSE,

M.A.,

SOMETIME FELLOW OF CHRIST's COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

CAMBRIDGEAT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.1895[All Bights resei'ved.]

V

^

:

As/A

BL

W.FEINTED BY

I

3-]

/o

(lambrilrgeJ.

AND

u. F.

CLAY,

AT THE UNIVERSITY PEEaS.

PREFACE.In a booklike this,

where a translation

is

made

for the first be.

time from a language

little

known, mistakes there needs must;

For any such I ask the indulgence of scholarsthat no trouble has been spared to get accuracy.

and assure them

A

word

or phrase

dismissed in a footnote as obscure or inexplicable has often cost

hours of research before

it

has been given up.

Although

it

has not been possible to reproduce the rhythm ofeffect

the verses, yet I hope something of the same

has been given

by keeping in each story to one metre where the Pali has but one,

and changing where

it

changes

;

and a pretty consistent rule hasfor

been observed, of giving long

lines

long and short for short,

two shortstories

lines being held equivalent to one long.

But

in different

the same metre has often been differently translated for

convenience.

Forfar

parallels

I

have looked through

all

the

Pali

books

as

as they are printed; but I have not

had time

to read

them

carefully,

and many

must have escaped me.Other

The notes must thenillustrations

not be considered as exhaustive.

have been

noted where I have come across them, and I hope that studentsof folk-talesI

may be

interested in one unpublished variant which

have been able to give (page 110).J.11.

b

;

vi

Preface.It

remains

to

acknowledge

my

indebtedness to those friendsof our

who have helped me.

The members

"Guild" who are

resident at Cambridge have been so kind as to revise the proofs

and

to

them

I

owe very many

corrections

and

improvements.'

Mrdue

R. Chalmers lent

me

a MS. translation of a few of the

Stories

of the Past,' for which I thank him.to

But;

my

chief thanks are

my

Master, Professor Cowellpatience

who, for

many

years past,

has with

unfailing

and

kindliness

helpedof these

memay

in

myhas

Oriental studies.

I feel

that what I;

knowI

things

been histhis

gift to

me

almost entirely

and

hope he

consider

book not

all

unworthy of

his teaching.

By

the kind permission of the Secretary of State for India, an

illustration ofin this

one of the stories from the Bharhut Stupafirst.

is

given

volume as in the

The

story

is

No. 267

:

the words

beneath the picture are

Naga

Jataka.

W. H.

D.

ROUSE.

Christ's College, Cambridge,Juhi/ 30, 1895.

MANIBVS

GVILLELMI ROBERTSON SMITHSVMMO DBSIDEEIOD. D. D.

b-2

CONTENTS.

151.

RAJOVADA-JATAKATwopower.dispute arises

.

.

.

.

1

kings, both wise and good, meet in a narrow way,

who

is

to give place.

Both are of

and a the same age and

Their drivers sing each his master's praises.

One

is

good

to the good,

and bad

to the bad; the other repays evil with good.

The152.

first

acknowledges his superior, and gives place.

SIGALA-JATAKAThe Bodhisattajackal, but seeingis

.

4;

a young lion, one of seven brotherssister.

a Jackalkill

proposes love to his

Six of the brothers set out tothemselves.

theto

him

as he lies in a crystal grotto, imaginekill

him

be in the sky, leap up and

The Bodhisatta

roars,

and the jackal153.

dies of fear.

SUKARA-JATAKi A boar challenges

.

.

7

and then in fear wallows amid filth until he smells so foul that the lion wOl not come near him, but owns himself vanquished rather than fight with him.a lion to fight;.

154.

URAGA-JATAKAAfixes

f)

Garula chases a serpent, which taking the form of a jewel, himself upon an ascetic's garment, and by this means wins

safety.

155.

GAGGA-JATAKA How a goblinother well at

,

.

11

had power over all people who did not wish each a sneeze, and how he was foiled.. .

156.

ALINA-CITTA-JATAKAAn

13

elephant runs a thorn into its foot carpenters, and serves them out of gratitude.

;

it

is

tended by some

His young one takes

his place afterwards, and is bought by the king for a large sum.

How

on the king's death,

it

routs a hostile host, and saves the

kingdom

for the king's infant son.

Contents.PAOE

157.

GUNA-JATAKA A jackal rescuesTheexplained, and

.

.17friend.is

a lion,

who out

of gratitude

makes him a

lioness is jealous of the she-jackal; then the

whole matter

maxims given

in praise of friendship.

158.

SUHANU-JATAKATwo

...all. .

......

21

savage horses, that maltreat

other of their kind, strikeillustrating the proverb,

up a sudden friendship with each other, thus'Birds of a feather.'

159.

MOEA-JATAKA How a peacock

23

kept itself safe by reciting spells;it

was disturbed by hearing the female's note, andthe king desired to eatdivinity that heto return to theit,

mind was caught; howits

how

but the peacock discoursed such goodfinally the bird

was stayed; andmountains.

was

set free

again

160.

VINILAKA-JATAKA A bird, the offspringthemto horses that serve

26of a goose with a crow,is

being carried by

his father's two other sons to see him, but is arrogant

and compares

him

;

so he is sent back again,

161.

INDASAMANAGOTTA-JATAKA How a man kept a fat elephant,trampled him to death.

28which turned against him and

162.

SANTHAVA-JATAKA How a man had hiswhich he made

....

...wasto

29

house burnt by reason of the great offerings

to his sacred fire.

163.

SUSiMA-JATAKA How a lad whose

.

31it

hereditary right

journeyed 2000 leagues in a day, learnt in time to conduct the ceremony.

manage a festival, the ceremonial, and returned

164.

GIJJHA-JATAKA

.

,

34

About a merchant who succoured some vultures, and they in return stole cloths and other things and brought to him; how one was caught, and the king learnt the story, and all the goods wererestored.

165.

NAKULA-JATAKA How a mungooseother nevertheless;

.,

3g

and a snake were friends, and distrusted each and how they were made at one..

166.

UPASALHA-JATAKA How a certain mandead body.

37

was particular in choice of burying-grounds, and how he was shown that there is no spot free of taint from some

.

Contents.

xi

167.

SAMIDDHI-jlTAKA How a nymph temptedman knows

.

....by fighting on his own ground.

1'AGE

39

the time of death.

168.

SAKUNAGGHI-JATAKA How a qu