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JFF Agility Notebook Official Publication for Just For Fun – Dog Agility for the Rest of Us Volume 1, Issue #11 – March, 2001

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  • JFF Agility NotebookOfficial Publication for Just For Fun – Dog Agility for the Rest of Us

    Volume 1, Issue #11 – March, 2001

  • Volume 1, Issue #11March 2001

    The JFF Agility Notebook ispublished monthly by

    Dogwood Training Center, LLC

    EDITORMarsha Martin

    CONTRIBUTORSKurt L. Glaub,Bud Houston,

    Nancy Krouse-Culley, Marsha Martin,Joann Schaus, Ruth Van Keuren

    SUBMISSIONSThe JFF Agility Notebook welcomes submissions

    of articles or artwork on an exclusive basis.Submission constitutes permission for JFF Agility

    Notebook to use the submitted materials, inwhole or in part, without compensation to the

    submitter.

    PERMISSIONSNo portion of this magazine may be reproduced

    in any form without the permission of thepublishers

    Copyright 2001Dogwood Training Center, LLC

    Table of ContentsClick on a topic to go there

    Editorial 2

    It Takes All Kinds 4

    Gamblers 5

    Junior Handler Training Manual 7

    Construction Plans 15

    Training Plans for the Agility Center 21

    Week One – Colors 24

    Week Two – Time and Score 39

    Week Three – Gamblers Anonymous 56

    Week Four – Double Joker 70

    Dogged Hope Rescue Foundation 87

    Cover art – "Kowboy" Brittany Spaniel; Owner: Kim Ramsey ofLas Cruces, NM; Artist: Nancy Krouse Culley of Bosque, NM

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 3 February, 2001

    Editorial– Marsha Martin, [email protected]puserve.com

    Every now and then I see our dogs curled up asleep and feel such an overwhelming lovefor them, it makes me question my sanity.

    They are, after all, just dogs. They've been known to eat feces. They'll steal my favoritegloves off the table and shred them in the yard. At 3:00 a.m., they'll throw up the gloveyarn they've consumed - on the white carpeting. They'll track dirt across a mopped floor,across clean carpets, and onto my freshly-laundered coverlet.

    I choose floor coverings based on their predictable footprints. Our house has baby gateslimiting their access to parts of the house, and limiting our easy access as well. Theshrubs in the dog yard were chosen for their durability, and have been stomped onrepeatedly. When I'm working in the kitchen my dogs are undoubtedly underfoot, and if Iturn too quickly or try to take a normal stride I'll be tripped by one of the little beggars.

    What strange part of me finds all these irritants endearing? The fact is I don't know. Butregardless, no one loves my dogs the way I do. I can talk about them for hours and havefew friends outside my dog community. I cannot love anyone else's dogs the way I do myown.

    When I look at a room full of beginner dogs, I see that same adoration in the eyes of everydog owner there. It doesn't matter if the dog is a breed champion or a gray-muzzledmixed-heritage dog that wandered into their home. The dog might be a canine genius ordim-witted. Their handlers think the world of them.

    These folks wouldn't dream of missing their agility class. They'll drive an hour intorrential rains and high winds, tromp across a flooded training yard, and stand in thepouring rain for a doggie exercise break.

    As I see it, our responsibility as agility instructors and dog trainers is to nurture thisrelationship and give it fertile ground to grow. We must help their dogs succeed atagility, and give these new handlers the tools they need to make success happen withgreater and greater frequency. The idea of flunking a dog out of beginner agility is aforeign concept to us.

    So, what happens when someone's pet creates a disruption in class time after time? Dowe criticize their control over the dog? Do we ask them to leave? Or do we give themadvice and training tips to strengthen the bond and engage their dog? The answer has gotto be the latter, if we are dog lovers. Our mission must be to keep them moving forwardin their training, and I'm confident they appreciate that.

    So, even though my dogs are undeniably the most beautiful and brilliant creatures ever tograce the earth, I must appreciate all the fine qualities in my students and their dogs.There are no bad dogs.

    And this is, after all, just for fun.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 4 February, 2001

    It Takes All Kinds– Marsha [email protected]

    The most wonderful part of having an active training center is the opportunity to observea variety of breeds - and combinations of breeds - learning dog agility. As a student ofthe sport, I am constantly amazed at the multitude of dog personalities. As an instructor Itry to work with my students to help them appreciate the dog they have, and maximizetheir team's potential.

    The Terrorists - terriers are the comedians of dog agility. Beginners with terriers willoften toss them at obstacles. Terriers never seem to take offense at this.

    Bye-bye Birdie - bird dogs invariably do agility with a reckless disregard for the obstaclesin front of them. Their noses are in the air, scanning for birds roosting in the rafters. Achange of direction just means they get to scan a new part of the building.

    The Terminators - these dogs are doing sequences just to get to the play period theyassume comes right after. They'll do whatever they're asked, but what they really want todo is go jump on that furry brown dog in the corner and get a game going.

    The Unappreciated - often viewed as dull and uninteresting, these wonderful dogs arewatching the other teams, memorizing the sequences, and planning strategies. Theirhandlers are so accustomed to their well-behaved dogs they find them slightly boring.

    The Attention Getters - they insist on time-and-a-half pay for every job, and expect abonus for actually doing the same course their handler outlines.

    The Volunteers - three jumps into a tunnel, up the dogwalk, two more jumps to the teeteris not enough for them. If their handler takes a second to think, their dog is gone. They'reready for real work, and you'd better keep up.

    Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves - instead of paying attention to their handler betweenexercises, they're sticking their noses in every training bag left on the floor. They'll comeup with plush toys, frisbees, plastic containers of treats, tug toys. (I've actually had myAussie come to me with a stolen plastic container filled with hotdogs. The message wasclear, "Hey! I can't open this darned thing! Can you help?")

    There are dozens more, and adding the variable of their handler's personality increases thepossible combinations exponentially. What a joy to see these teams, regardless of themix, succeeding in this wonderful sport.

    For every beloved dog we see in beginner agility, there are hundreds of neglected,perhaps abused, dogs languishing in back yards. We're missionaries for dogs and dogsports, and I'm pleased when I can make a difference for just one dog. Maybe thecomment I make today will help someone appreciate their dog a little more, and maybethe way I treat my dogs will serve as an example to folks who are new to this communityof dog lovers.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 5 February, 2001

    Gamblers– by Joanne [email protected]

    Gamblers is a fun class. Many folks do indeed use it for a warm-up, if it is the first class ofthe day, because in the opening period you choose your own course. The obstacles havedifferent point values and you can take obstacles only twice for points. If you'd like to workcontacts or weave poles, you can do so. If your dog is fast enough and adept at working at adistance, you may even qualify while you are using the class as a warm-up and trainingsession. I won't elaborate on the rules but will give you a few pointers.

    Train your dog to work at a distance before you attempt a gamble. Many folks just stand atthe gamble line, waving their arms and shouting commands at their dog. Any dog worth hissalt would either stand there all confused or come back to his handler to make sure she wasOK. Use targets to convince your dog that going away from you towards an obstacle is areally good thing. There is a good book just out on teaching distance work, by Stacy Peardotand Bud Houston, Go the Distance. This will be an invaluable tool for you, especially if youtrain alone.

    If you don't have time to train your dog before you show, just work the gamble like youwould any other section of the course and ignore the line. You won't Q but your dog will geta nice warm-up and will not get confused. You could attempt the gamble if your dog is fastwith lots of drive and his natural momentum may very well take him away from you for asuccessful gamble. Novice gambles are usually quite doable. The line isn't that far away fromthe obstacles and the obstacles are usually right in line with each other. NADAC hasinstructed their judges to increase the difficulty of their Novice gambles a bit to lessen therude awakening for Open gambles. So you may well encounter some turns. It could be unfairand possibly detrimental to your dog to ask him to work away from you without training himto do so. You want that first experience to be positive, not negative. And you wouldn't askyour dog to weave, for example, at a trial or even in training wthout first training him to doso. I view distance work in the same manner.

    Do not use any gamble jumps in your opening period. If a rail is knocked then you can'tsuccessfully complete that jump in the gamble and you ruin your chances for a Q.

    Use a stopwatch during the walk-through to time your planned opening course to make sureyou will be where you want to be when the whistle blows to start the gamble. Run as you aretiming...just as you run your dog...to get an accurate time. This takes some experience toknow just how fast your dog actually runs. That will come.

    Plan a nice straight line of jumps or a tunnel, not a slow obstacle like the dogwalk, as yourlast sequence just before the gamble so your dog has momentum and a straight, fast approachto the gamble. Now you see why the stopwatch is imperative.

    Give yourself some obstacles to take in your opening plan in case the whistle doesn't blowwhen you planned (in case your dog runs faster than expected). Don't use obstacles right atthe gamble opening cause you have then lost your nice line to the gamble, the one youplanned to give your dog momentum and direction to work away from you. Plus if youdawdle at the gamble area, waiting for the whistle, the judge can call you for loitering (notallowed...this is a game of strategy and you can't just wait around for the whistle and you

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 6 February, 2001

    can't take any obstacles more than twice to waste time waiting for that whistle) and you won'tQ even if your dog successfully completes the gamble.

    Try to find a place on the course where you can practice an approximation of your gamble inyour opening sequence...not the gamble itself, of course, but another area with a similarsetup. Sometimes you can find these (some judges include them intentionally) andsometimes you can't. If you can find one and work it at a distance your dog should be moreinclined to do it again just a few seconds later at the gamble itself.

    Pattern your distance work a bit on the practice jump outside the ring. If the gamble has a"get-out over" to the left then use the practice jump accordingly.

    Teach your dog "get-out", "go", "left" and "right". The first two are vital for all levels ofGamblers and the directionals will be invaluable for advanced gambles where your dog willneed to turn at a distance.

    Use your off-arm signal in conjunction with your "get-out" verbal cue. The off-arm signalforces your shoulder to turn in the direction you want your dog to turn...away from you.

    Leave yourself plenty of room so that you can continue running towards the gamble lineinstead of coming to an abrupt halt, which will signal your dog to stop. This means youshould start sending your dog ahead well before the gamble sequence. If there is a tunnelearly in the gamble...almost always the case with NADAC Novice gambles...you can back upwhile your dog is blind in the tunnel so that you then have room to run forward as he exitsthe tunnel, propelling him to run forward (and away from you) also. Just make sure the dog isinside the tunnel before you back up so you don't cause him to back out of the tunnel. Try tothink of that gamble line as merely one boundary edge of a huge area that you can use tomove around in. I try to plan my gambles so that I don't get too close to that line. Forexample (arbitrary), if the gamble is jump, tunnel, jump, jump and the gamble line anglessuch that it is five feet from the first jump and gradually widens to 15 feet from the lastjump...make sure that you start working your gamble about 15 feet from the first jump so thatyou can continue moving along a parallel line while you complete the gamble sequence. Ifyou start close to that gamble line and run along it, you might pull your dog off the gamble asyou are forced to move further and further away from your dog.

    I like to stay away from the gamble obstacles in the opening period (not use any of them forpoints) unless I am certain I can safely steer my dog among them without the possibility oftaking two gamble obstacles in sequence. If I am late with a cue and she takes the nextobstacle (in the gamble sequence) during the opening period then we NQ before we evenattempt the gamble. You can't take two gamble obstacles in sequence in the opening period.

    Relax. More people get all flustered over Gamblers than anything else and that nervousnessis so easily picked up by the dog. Just imagine how much more difficult it is then for the dogto feel comfy working away from you.

    Oh my. I've written too much. Sorry for the book. Hope some of you find the tips useful.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 7 February, 2001

    Junior HandlerAgility Training ManualPart Four in a Series

    Written by:Ruth Van Keuren

    With revisions by:Bud Houston

    KnockoutStart class with a little competition this week. Set up two courses side by side, ashort distance apart, with start and finish lines. Obstacles should be placed sothat the dog’s path will cover a distance of 15 to 20 feet between each.

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80

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    Winners continue to run off against each other until there is one winner. Thewinner should alternate which side of the course he works; working one time onthe side with the tire, and the text time on the side with the pipe tunnel.

    Losers can also run off against each other, the winner of these heats can then runagainst the undefeated dog. Besides being fun for the handlers, this will help theinstructor determine which dogs understand the tire and tunnel, which dogs arestaying with their handlers, which dogs are looking ahead to the next obstacle oncommand, and which handler and dog teams need more work.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 8 February, 2001

    Table ReviewIt is best to use a toy to teach the dog the meaning of the word “table”. Thehandler should take the dog and a toy to the table and place the toy on the tableso the dog knows where the toy is. The handler should then take the dog two orthree steps away from the table, give the command, “table” and let the dog go tothe table for the toy. This will teach the “table” command only. Handlers can usea bale of hay, a bed, or a footstool to substitute for the table when practicing athome.

    I hesitate to use food in this exercise, as it will teach the dog to sniff the table. Iffood is used it is best to use food in hand to guide the dog onto the table, andthen give the food to the dog as a reward.

    Once the dog understands the “table” command and is jumping onto the table oncommand, the down is added. The dog must, therefore, know the “down”command on the ground first. In this exercise the toy or food will come from thehandler after the dog is in the down position. This command will now become“tabledown” as one word. This may be hard for the handlers to put together, butthe dog has to know b3efore it is on the table that it has to down once on thetable. Remind the handler to add “stay” when the dog is in the down position.

    The handler should next move around the table while the dog is on a down stay.The dog should not be allowed to roll around to watch the handler. Be sure thehandler does not correct the dog if the “stay” command was not given or if thedog does not understand “stay”.

    After the handler has walked all the way around the table, and the dog hasremained in place, he should call the dog with hands up and tons of enthusiasm.This will insure a quick take-off from the table. Increase the distance the handleris able to go from the table while the dog is on a “tabledown stay” command,until the handler is able to move 20 feet away from the dog, and it will stay untilcalled. This is a typical distance a handler might want to be from the dog on theAgility course to prepare for the next obstacle. Once this is accomplished the dogshould be left on a down/stay on the table while the handler moves to a jump 20feet away in order to call the dog off the table to take the jump where the handleris standing. As obstacles are added to the training sessions, the dog can be calledto any of them from the table.

    The instructor should explain the table count to all handlers. The count is “5-4-3-2-1-GO”. The dog must stay on the table in the down position, with its elbows onthe table, for the duration of the count. The dog must not leave the table until theword GO is completed. The count should always be done when the table is beingpracticed, and handlers should take turns counting foe each other. Incompetition there is a 5 point penalty if the dog leaves the table before the wordGO is completed.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 9 February, 2001

    There are now four obstacles to work with: jumps, tire, pipe tunnel, and table.Neither the dog nor the handler will get bored if the same sequence is done onlythree or four times before there is a change of direction or obstacle in thesequence. Remember, training has to be fun for both handler and dog. Have thehandlers set up courses or come up with a game for one of the classes. I like toend classes with something that is fun for both handler and dog that involvessome sort of competition. Be sure to explain what is good about the game orcourse they have come up with. Handlers also need positive motivation.

    Serpentine Sequence10 20 30 40 50 60

    10 20 30 40 50 60

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    5

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    Set up the course shown in the figure above. The tunnel will include a bend thatwill not allow the dog to see all the way through to the exit. This will be fun forthe handlers because they haven’t tried it before, and it seldom makes anydifference to the dog.

    Set up a Start and Finish line and ask the parents to do the timing. If the handlersfeel they are progressing too slowly, and aren’t being challenged by the numberof obstacles they have learned thus far, this will give them the challenge theyneed. The instructor should remind them that these are obstacles they will seemost often in competition courses of 16 to 20 obstacles. A solid and timelycommand on their part, plus understanding and response on the dog’s part areall very necessary.

    At this point handlers should start to send their dogs over jumps, call their dogsthrough the tire to them, get fast downs on the table, and a fast call of f the tableto the next obstacle.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 10 February, 2001

    A-frame ReviewThe objective of this exercise is to teach the dog that the A-frame is a climbingobstacle.

    All dogs should start close to the bottom of the ramp so they learn to use the slatson the A-frame to climb. This will be difficult for the larger breeds that carry a lotof weight, like Rottweilers, Mastiffs, St. Bernards and, unfortunately, overweightdogs. The heavier breeds will need a slight run at the A-frame in order to pulltheir weight up the ramp.

    Council your students with overweight dogs to put them on a diet in order tocontinue agility. This is a physical sport and the out-of-condition dog will notenjoy it much.

    Putting a toy on the ground on the down side of the A-frame will give the dog atarget and prevent it from jumping off half way down and missing a contact. Thetoy should be on the ground 6 o 12 inches from the bottom of the ramp,depending upon the size of the dog. Again, be sure a command, “walk-up” or“scramble” or “ramp” (or whatever the handler chooses for this obstacle) is givenbefore the dog reaches the ramp. Using “up-up-up” once the dog has started upencourages it to continue on up-, and works especially well with smaller dogs.

    After the dog has gone over the apex of the ramp and is headed own the otherside, “wait,” “easy,” “bottom,” or “all the way” commands should be used tostop the dog’s motion on the ramp. The handler can help slow the dog byslowing himself, even coming to a complete stop alongside the dog. This willteach the dog to continue on slowly and therefore touch the contact zone on thedon side of the ramp also. The handler should not get in front of the dog, andshould instead, stay to the side and slightly behind the dog, as this will help thedog to wait until the handler gives the command to continue. If the dog doesn’tstop, the instructor might occasionally put hands on the dog to stop it while thehandler gives the command he is using to get the dog to wait or stop.

    The A-frame should be set at 4 feet 6 inches for this early training so the dogswill take it easily and work through the contacts. This foundation trainingbecomes very important to the dog’s success on the higher ramps used in latertraining and in competition.

    When teaching the A-frame do it for the entire class once. It helps handlers towatch other handlers. It also helps the working handler and dog team to have acheering section, so encourage everyone to cheer and clap for the team that isworking.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 11 February, 2001

    The “Tabledown” StaySet up a competition to test how far each handler can move away from his dogwhile the dog remains on a “tabledown stay”. This can be done in two ways:

    1. The handler puts the dog on a “tabledown”, and then moves farther andfarther away from the dog. The handler who can move the farthest from thedog before the dog moves is the winner.

    2. The handler best on the distance he can move away from the dog before itmoves. If the handler is correct he wins. All winners must increase thisdistance every time they try. The handler who correctly predicts the greatestdistance is the winner. Losers can compete in the same manner, however, thedown/stay should be done on the ground instead of on the table.

    The moving downThis exercise will help handlers achieve a faster down on the table. Arrange thehandler/dog teams side by side in a straight line. As the group is heeling along,the instructor should signal the handler sto give their dogs a “down” command.Each handler gives his dog a verbal “down” command. Each handler gives hisdog a verbal “down” and slides his hand down the leash toward the ground tobring the dog into the down position. As soon as the dog goes down it is releasedwith lots of praise. This exercise should be done three to four times in a row.

    Handlers can progress to using just their hands without the leash correction. Theexercise then becomes a hand signal for the dog to down while in motion. If thehandlers keep the exercise fun they will start getting very fast downs from theirdogs. Once the dog understands the exercise the dog should only get praise forfast downs./ No0 praise should be given for slow downs. Downs can be used tocontrol a fast dog on the agility course by using them to get the dog under thehandler’s control before the command for the next obstacle is given.

    Working coursesTwo short courses with a mixture of obstacles are set up.

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70

    10 10Wait Come

    In order to work this course the handler should leave the dog on a wait, move to the endof the tunnel, and call the dog through. He should then run with the dog to the table, andput the dog on a “tabledown”. During the countdown, “5-4-3-2-1-Go,” the handler shouldmove to the far side of the jump and call the dog over after the word “Go”.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 12 February, 2001

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70

    10 10Wait

    Come

    In this variation of the exercise, the handler will take a lead out nearly to the table and callthe dog through the pipe tunnel and onto the table for a “tabledown” performance”During the countdown, “5-4-3-2-1-Go,” the handler should move back to the oppositeside of the pipe tunnel, and call the dog through the tunnel after the word “Go”.

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70

    10 10Wait

    Come

    In this sequence the handler should run with the dog from the start as it takes the firstjump. He will then direct the dog over the A-frame, making sure the dog touches bothcontact zones. Then the handler runs on to direct the dog to the final jump.

    In a variation of the exercise, the handler will lead out to the bottom of the A-frame andcall the dog over the first jump, and will work with the dog the rest of the way throughthe sequence.

    The Collapsed TunnelThe dog should already understand the “tunnel” command as a result of previous training.In this exercise the handler will teach the dog to continue on when it is unable to seewhere it is going, and how to burrow through a collapsed fabric chute. The handlers houldhold the fabric part of the tunnel open for the first few times, while the handler restrainsthe dog on-lead at the opening of the collapsed tunnel.

    The fabric is progressively lowered until the dog is tunneling through by itself. If thehandler is at the side of the tunnel when he calls the dog, it will try to go through the side,so make sure the handler is ahead of the dog when it starts through. The dog will tend torun toward the sound of the handler’s voice, so the position of the handler is critical to thesuccess of this exercise. A jump can be added before and after the closed tunnel.

    When setting up stations in class, try to rotate all handlers through each station. A whistlecan be blown to signal the switch to the next station. Those handlers having problems canwork on them before or after class. If a handler is having a problem with a particularobstacle, he should not work on the obstacle until the instructor is free to spend sometime on the problem.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 13 February, 2001

    Things to do For Fun

    Knock OutAlmost any of the previous exercises can be used for a knock-out competition. In knockout two similar courses are set up, both having Start and Finish lines. Two dog andhandler teams run against each other, the first team finishing with no faults is the winner.Losing teams can also run off against each other, the team remaining after thiscompetition would then run off against the undefeated team to determine the overallwinner.

    Boxed PairsTeams are composed of two handlers and their dogs. The teams stand in a five-footsquare, marked area on the agility course. The boundaries of this area are the Start andFinish lines. Time starts when the first handler and dog leave the “box” to run the course.The other handler and dog must remain inside the boundaries of the box until the foirsthandler and dog return to the box.

    If the handler and dog on the course commit a fault, they must return to the boximmediately. Once they are inside the boundaries, the other handler and dog leave the boxand start the course at the point where the fault occurred. This rotation continues until theentire course has been run twice, at which point time stops. If no fault occurs, the firsthandler and dog return to the box after running the entire course once, and the secondhandler and dog start at the beginning of the course. The team with the best time is thewinner.

    Team RelaysTeams are composed of three handlers and their dogs. At least two of the dogs must jumpthe same height. A course is set up using ten familiar obstacles, numbered 1 through 10.Two dogs that jump the same height run obstacles 1 through 5, and the remaining dogruns obstacles 6 thr4ough 10. The running order is:

    1. The first dog runs obstacles 1 through 5

    2. The second dog runs obstacles 6 through 10

    3. The third dog runs obstacles 1 through 5

    The team having the best combined time with the fewest faults is the winner.

    As a mixer for a fun match, teams could be composed of handlers and dogs from differentclubs.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 14 February, 2001

    Run OffA control course is set up with four stations plus a start/finish line. Two handler and dogteams run off against each other. Time starts when a whistle is blown. A number ofdiffering courses can be used. An example of a control course follows:

    1. The dog heels with the handler from the Start/Finish line to station 1.

    2. The dog runs with the handler to station 2, where the dog is put on a stay.

    3. The handler moves to station 3 and calls the dog.

    4. Both take off on a run from station 3, the handler putting the dog on a movingdown/stay when reaching station 4.

    5. The handler then continues to the Start/Finish line and calls the dog.

    Parents can be used for timing so the instructors are free to make sure the teams are doingeach part of the course correctly. It seems to be most fun for handlers if something theyhave just learned is incorporated into the game.

    JumpersA course is set up using jumps only, including the tire jump. Jumps should be set up inpatterns incorporating left and right turns, large circles, straight-aways, and changes ofsides. All jumps must be numbered to indicate the sequence in which they are to be taken.Try setting up a course in which jumps are to be retaken from the opposite direction, andnumber each side of the jump accordingly. Allow each handler to walk the course withouthis dog before running the course.

    Time each handler and dog team, and score all faults. Each knocked pole or wrong courseis considered a fault, and each fault results in a 5-second penalty added on to the runningtime. The fastest time is the winner.

    Try to get together with other club s in your area to put on fun matches. This will allowfor a different mix of competitors, and may also change any perceptions that certainhandlers always win. A nominal entry fee can be charged to help defray the cost of theclub’s equipment.

    Try to organize a trip to a regular agility even to give the handlers an idea of what to aimfor. Some local agility clubs would appreciate help in putting on their events, so let theclubs know if you have any handlers that are willing to help, as the exposure is reallygood for them.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 15 February, 2001

    JumpsThree SimpleDesigns

    ConstructionPlans

    – by Kurt L. Glaub INTERNET:[email protected]

    Jump – Version 24 jumpThis is a simple box but depending upon artistic abilities can be made into some veryinteresting jumps. These jumps are constructed of ¼" Luan plywood, 2X2 balusters and apiece of 2"X12" for a weighted base. This jump measures 11.75" square by 37.5" tall.

    Materials Required (for 4 jump sets)• 2"X12" – 8’ long 1 piece• ¼" luan plywood 4 sheets• 2X2X36" balusters 32 pieces• 1" screws or brads 256 pieces

    Tools Needed• Table saw or radial arm saw. Circular saw can be used but will require a lot of

    patience and some skill.

    • Screwdriver

    Instructions1. Rip each sheet of plywood as shown below.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 16 February, 2001

    9.25”

    11.75 11.75 11.75 11.75 11.75 11.75 11.75 11.75

    37.5”

    2. Step 2, Cut the 2"X12" – 8’ long into 8 squares 11 ½" by 11 ½".

    These cuts should result in 32 pieces of ¼" luan 11.75" by 37.5" and 8 piecesof 2"X12" 11 ½" square.

    Assembly Instructions1. Using 4 of the pieces of Luan, 4 of the balusters and 1 of the pieces of 2"X12"

    make a box as follows;

    1” screws orbrads

    Line these edges flush

    Luan

    2”X12”

    Balluster Line this edge flush

    1” screws or brads 1 every 6”

    2. Repeat for remaining 3 sides. When finished, the top will be open and looklike the following sketch.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 17 February, 2001

    Luan

    2”X12”

    Balluster

    3. Repeat for remaining uprights.

    4. Sand and paint then install jump cups.

    Contact Marsha Martin at 8738 Slocum Road, Ostrander, OH 43061(740) 666-2018 - [email protected]

    http://www.dogwoodagility.com

    Treat yourself and your dog to a four-day agilityand gam es vacation in rural O hio. These unique w eekday

    cam ps are lim ited in size -- everyonegets personal attention from one of A m erica’s

    favorite agility trainers.

    Cam p Dogwoodan intim ate agility experience (15 cam pers only)Cam p fee only $3 0 0 / Instructors Cam p is $46 0

    ($10 0 deposit required); A uditors $150Other Camps

    June 19 to June 22, 2001 (full)Aug 13 to Aug 16, 2001Oct 1 to Oct 4, 2001

    Instructors Apr 16 to Apr 19, 2001 (full)Masters July 3 to July 6, 2001Instructors Aug 27 to Aug 30, 2001Distance Oct 15 to Oct 18, 2001

    Advanced Camps

    Novice CampsMar 6 to Mar 9, 2001

    Jun 5 to Jun 8, 2001July 23 to July 26, 2001Sept 17 to Sept 20, 2001Nov 6 to Nov 9, 2001Nov 26 to Nov 29, 2001

    Mar 20 to Mar 23, 2001

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 18 February, 2001

    Jump – Version 25 jump

    Materials Required• 2"X4" – 8’ long 3 pieces• Jump cups and screws 12 sets• 6" multi-use screws 16 pieces• 3" multi-use screws 36 pieces

    Instructions1. From 1 2X4 – 8’ long cut two pieces as shown below. These are the angled

    side pieces.

    40”

    60°

    30°

    Scrap

    2. From 1 2X4 – 8’ long cut two pieces 38 3/16” long and 6 pieces 1 ½” long

    38 3/16” 38 3/16”

    1.5” piecesScrap

    3. From 1 2X4 – 8’ long cut two pieces 20” long and 2 pieces 24” long

    20” 20” 24” 24” Scrap

    4. Using the scrap pieces, cut four pieces 9” long

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 19 February, 2001

    Assembly Instructions1. Assembly is quite simple as shown below. In addition to screws as shown, I

    strongly recommend using dowels or some other form of reinforcement in thejoints. It is helpful to lay the 3 pieces on a flat work table and clamp togetheror to the table before drilling and assembling with screws. Work on one jointat a time.

    If the screws come throughthe boards, they must befiled flush for safety.

    2. Assemble supports using the 9” pieces and the 24” pieces using 12 of the 3”screws as follows.

    9” Piece9” Piece

    24” piece

    3” screws1 ½” gap Centeredon the 24” piece

    3. Attach support to upright using 6” screws as shown below

    Support – slides over end and isattached using 2 of the 6” screws.

    Sacrificial Feet

    4. Jump is now ready for jump cup attachment.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 20 February, 2001

    Jump – Version 26 jumpThis is a simple winged jump that if you are fortunate to have a lot of barrels can be usedfor a very serviceable jump.

    This jump is simply 2 barrels to which jump cups are attached.

    Assembly is simple, set the barrels on end as shown above, layout jump heights andattach jump cups.

    A Call For Agility Games– Bud [email protected]

    Stuart Mah and I have decided to write the 2d edition of the Book of Agility Games. Thisprocess will probably take the rest of this year.

    Do you want to be famous? Revered? Published? If you’ve invented your own agilitygame we’d like to hear about it! We’re interested not only in the hard-bitten games ofcompetition but fun games that clubs play on social nights and on special holidays.

    Please email your game design directly to me at the address above. Tell us when the gamewas first played, and where it was played. We’d appreciate a course map and a completedescription of the rules.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 21 February, 2001

    Training Plans for the Agility Center– by Bud [email protected]

    Down Under

    I’m preparing to take off again for Australiawhere I visited in 1999. My seminar tour hasbeen expanded to include Syndey, Brisbane,Melbourne, Canberra, and Perth.

    My last trip was all business, without any daysoff to make a tourist of myself in this farawayland. I’m going to take it a bit more slowly onthis trip, making sure that I take in more of thesights.

    The folks in Australia have actually been doing agility for longer than we have in theUnited States. However, until a few years ago the Australian idea of an agility course wasnine obstacles arranged in a “U” shape. Consequently they’re a bit behind us now interms of handling in the international style of the game.

    I’ve quite a bit of new stuff to show the Aussies this time around. In the two years sincemy last visit I’ve experienced something of a epiphany in my understanding of the waydogs move. I look forward to making the Australian experience a matter of continuedstudies, rather than regurgitating the same old thing.

    Of course this trip takes me away from Dogwood Training Center for more than a month.At the training center we’ll be recycling old favorites. Consequently there’ll be no newdevelopment for inclusion in a future issue of the Notebook. What I’m intent on doingthat month is completely documenting much of my seminar work to the extent that therewill be a single Down Under edition of the Notebook, a couple months down the line,dedicated to the work I do on that continent.

    Growth of the JFF Agility NotebookFebruary 2001 has been our slowest growth month since we started publishing theNotebook. Frankly I’ve given a lot of energy to promoting the publication up until thismonth. Because of the many projects underway, the “Jr. Handlers Workbook,”,compiling Kurt Glaub’s “Construction Plans,” into an electronic document, working ona series of handouts for the training center, I’ve not had time for simple marketing. Mostof the agility world still does not know we exist.

    I will renew marketing of the Notebook with real energy in the month of March. I’llremind you all that you can earn a free month tacked on to the end of your subscription byreferring someone who becomes a subscriber. Send email addresses and names to me, andI will give a free peak at the magazine to the persons you refer.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 22 February, 2001

    Technological AngstAs most of you know, Yahoo has subsumed eGroups. So now everyone is required tohave a log-on id to Yahoo just to have access to the Notebook. I am working on finding anew host for subscribers that isn’t as completely daft an unconcerned with users as isYahoo.

    In this past month I have upgraded my computer, the Windows operating system, myemail version, and many of the programs that I use for production purposes. All of thishas wasted many hours of my time on installing software, rebuilding files, sitting on thephone to indifferent customer service centers, and transferring files between computers.

    Software is especially painful as the perpetrators of enhancement seem to think thatchange is better, whether that change represents an improvement or travesty. Predatorymarketers like MicroSoft, Yahoo, and AOL foist mediocrity upon us and are casuallyindifferent to the havoc they wreak in our lives. Technology should simplify life. But witheach so called enhancement and improvement the technology is more difficult to wield,and often inferior to the predecessor technology.

    I have chosen the path of the electronic publication. So I will rely on the existingtechnology to deliver the Notebook each month. I’m fully aware that many of you are atthe mercy of this technology. I’m happy to help you resolve any difficulties you mighthave each month. Feel free to email me.

    Navigating the Notebook

    You can navigate in through the Notebook by paging through it or by using navigationalstructures. You can also retrace your steps through documents to return to where youstarted.

    Paging through the Notebook

    Acrobat provides buttons, keyboard shortcuts, and menu commands for paging through aPDF document.

    To go to another page:

    Do one of the following:

    • To go to the next page, click the Next Page button in the command bar or status bar,press the Right Arrow key, press Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) and the DownArrow key, or choose Document > Next Page.

    • To go to the previous page, click the Previous Page button in the command bar orstatus bar, press the Left Arrow key, press Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) andthe Up Arrow key, or choose Document > Previous Page.

    • To move down one line, press the Down Arrow key.

    • To move up one line, press the Up Arrow key.

    • To move down one screen, press Page Down or Return.

  • Just For Fun Agility Notebook Page 23 February, 2001

    • To move up one screen, press Page Up or Shift+Return.

    • To go to the first page, click the First Page button in the command bar or status bar,press the Home key, or choose Document > First Page.

    • To go to the last page, click the Last Page button in the command bar or the statusbar, press the End key, or choose Document > Last Page.

    Browsing the Notebook

    To browse with a bookmark:

    Show the Bookmarks palette. You may need to choose Window > Show Bookmarks toopen the palette or click the Bookmarks tab to bring the palette to the front of its group.

    To jump to a topic using its bookmark, click the text in the Bookmarks palette.

    The Table of Contents is Linked !

    To follow a link: Position the pointer over the article in the table of contents. The pointerchanges to a hand with a pointing finger . Then click the link.

    Retracing your viewing path

    After you have paged through the Notebook, or used bookmarks or links from the Tableof Contents to move through the document, you can retrace your path back to where youstarted. You can go 64 steps back in Acrobat, or 32 steps back for documents in externalbrowser windows.

    To retrace your viewing path:

    Do one or more of the following:

    • To retrace your path within a PDF document, click the Go To Previous View buttonin the command bar, or choose Document > Go Back for each step back. Or click theGo To Next View button , or choose Document > Go Forward for each step forward.

    • To retrace your viewing path through other PDF documents, choose Document > GoBack Doc for each step back or Document > Go Forward Doc for each step forward.Or hold down Shift, and click the Go Back or Go Forward button.

    Dogwood Training Center

    http://www.dogwoodagility.com/store

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 24 March, 2001

    Week One – Colors

    S

    F

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    45

    6

    7

    89

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    11

    12

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    15

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    18

    1920

    Advanced Course

    BriefingThis game consists of three nested courses. Each league team must run each course atleast once. In the final tally, a score for each course must be kept by the team.

    The Advanced and Intermediate courses will be judged under USDAA Advanced rules.That means refusals will be judged on contact obstacles only. And all contacts, up anddown will be judged. Off courses are 20 faults.

    The Beginners course will be judged under USDAA Starters rules. There are no refusals.Off-courses are 5 faults. The four-paw safety rule will not be observed. However, thejudge may tell a handler to go on with his dog if the performance of a contact obstacleseems unsafe.

    Marking Your JFF Dance CardsA clean run is required to qualify in this game.

    • Beginners Course – Beginners• Intermediate Course – Intermediate• Advanced Course – Superior

    MVP points will be earned only by those dogs running the Advanced course.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 25 March, 2001

    S

    F

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    1213

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    18

    Intermediate Course

    S

    F

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    23

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    Beginners Course

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 26 March, 2001

    Beginners Class Plan – Week One

    Side One

    Side Two

    Side OneFigure-of-eight – begin by showing your students the figure-of-eight exercise, teachingthe dogs to pay keen attention to the handler’s lead. Note: The figure-of-eight exercise isdescribed in this week’s Student Handout.

    Introducing the bar jump – Use only non-winged bar jumps for the introduction. Thebars should be crossed in the jump standards, with one end in the 8” cup, and the other onthe ground.

    The goal is to teach the dog to go between the jump standards as the handler shows thejump. Show your students how to square up your body as you show the jump to the dog.The handler should face the direction the dog is expected to move. The dog gets hisdirection cue from the set of the handler’s shoulders. Face the jump and move directlyalongside of it, showing the path the dog should work with the lead hand, the hand closestto the dog. As the handler passes alongside the standard, the dog goes over the jump.

    Remind your students to give the dog a food reward. The reward, both treat and praise forthe dog, should be given immediately as the dog jumps the bar.

    The introduction to the jump should be done with the dog on lead.

    1. Working with the dog on the handler’s left, show the dog the jump.

    2. Working the dog on the handler’s right, show the dog the jump.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 27 March, 2001

    3. The handler leaves the dog in a sit or down stay and moves to the opposite side of thejump. The leash should drape over the jump bar. If the dog won’t stay, the instructorwill want to hold the dog while the handler moves into position across the jump.

    4. Repeat steps 1 through 3 several times.

    Introducing the Weave Poles – The weave poles will be fully wired. Tonight we areonly going to only a few repetitions of this obstacle, a couple on the handler’s right, and acouple on the handler’s left. The dog must be on leash, with the handler’s inside armholding the leash or collar so that the dog can not jump over or duck under the wires. Wedo not want to compel the dog through the wires. We want the dog to pick his ownfootsteps. The dog can be lured with food to help him make those footsteps.

    Introducing the Tire – Set the tire so that the bottom of the inside aperture is no morethan 6” off the ground. The goal is to teach the dog to go through the aperture.Demonstrate for your students how to square up for the performance of the tire. Thehandler should face the direction the dog is expected to move. The dog gets his directioncues from the set of the handler’s shoulders. Demonstrate a clear hand signal, using thehand closest to the dog, pushing towards the tire.

    Make sure your students reward and praise the dog for each time he jumps through thetire. Dogs are reward motivated.

    You will control the dog’s leash on the initial presentation of the tire. The handler shouldgo to the opposite side and call the dog through. If the dog tries to duck left or right theinstructor will stop the dog’s progress. If the dog volunteers to get to his handler throughthe tire, then the instructor just allows the lead to slip through his hands.

    Once the dogs seem to have the idea of the tire you can let the handlers present the tire tothe dog themselves. Put the dog through on the handler’s right. Put the dog through on thehandler’s left. Leave the dog in a sit or a down stay, and call the dog through.

    Introducing the A-frame – The A-frame will be set at about 3’. Get everyone to load upwith food. Put the dog over on the handler’s right. Put the dog over on the handler’s left.Please do not use any form of compulsion to get the dog over. Use a lure if necessary.Use a lot of praise and reward for each trip the dog takes over the A-frame.

    In this set put everyone twice over the A-Frame (set at 3’). Keep it light and happy.Remind students to give the dog a food treat at the bottom of the A-Frame in the handclosest to the dog. First two repetitions should be on-lead. Do not let students drag or pullthe dog’s leash. The leash is for control prior to going up, and after coming down.

    Sequencing – If you have enough time after introducing the obstacles in your groups, youcan try a short, two-obstacle, sequence: Jump to A-frame. Speak to your students brieflyabout using the arm closest to the dog and the obstacle to point the way for the dog. Thisis called a lead hand.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 28 March, 2001

    Side TwoSee “Introducing the bar jump,” above. Introduce the bar jump as the first obstacle.

    Introducing the dogwalk – We’ll have the trainer dogwalk up, with the wide boards and the topset at about 3’. Our methodology is never to compel the dog. The handler works over thedogwalk with the dog, using a food treat to lure if necessary. The handler should alternateworking the dog on both left and right. A lot of praise and an immediate food reward at thebottom of the dogwalk will make the dog a lot more confident and willing to climb up over thisobstacle.

    If a dog is refusing the dogwalk we can use a very effective technique for getting the dog tovolunteer to walk up the ramp. The instructor should hold the dog’s leash while the handlerwalks up the ramp to the center table, calling the dog after her. If the dog tries to go left or rightaround the ascent ramp the instructor will draw the dog up short at the end of the leash. If the dogvolunteers to walk up, however, the instructor just lets him go. Do not pull on the dog’s leadwhile he is walking up the ramp. That will make him very nervous.

    Introducing the table – You might begin each group by having your students show you their“down” as a group. Have them down their dogs, go to the end of the leash, facing the dog. After amoment, have them return to their dogs. Exercised finished. Give them a pep talk about workingthe Down command at home.

    We’re going to teach the Happy Table exercise. No harsh obedience-style downing of the dogwill be allowed. Remember how this works. Put a treat in the fist. Put the dog up on the table. Putthe fist down on the table, telling the dog Down! As soon as the dog gets down, open the fist.Dogs are very clever about this game. It should be upbeat and reward based.

    Remind your students that Sit, Down, and Stay are described in the Student Handout for weekone. They need to be working on these skills in earnest during the week so that their dogs will beprepared for these performances when working in class.

    Introducing the Pipe Tunnel – All of the training sets include pipe tunnels. Your first groupwill be introduced to the pipe tunnel. Other groups that you get will already have beenintroduced. Change the length and bend of the tunnel to be more challenging for each group.Shorten the tunnel and take the bend out if dogs aren’t getting it.

    The pipe tunnel will be compressed so that it is barrel-like, short and easy to see through to theother side. Our methodology is never to compel the dog. The instructor holds the dog’s leashwhile the handler goes to the other side to call the dog through. If the dog tries to go right or goleft, around the tunnel, you will check the dog’s motion. If the dog volunteers to get to his humanby going through the tunnel, then you will just let the leash slip through your fingers.

    On subsequent repetitions the handler should make the presentation of the pipe tunnel. Theinstructor will gradually add length to the tunnel by pulling it open. After the tunnel is at fulllength the instructor can add bend to the tunnel. This should be done only gradually, as the dogs’confidence grows.

    Sequencing – After introducing the obstacles in your groups, you can try a short, two-obstacle, sequence: Jump to pipe tunnel. Talk to your students briefly about the handler’smotion. A handler in motion is very compelling to the dog. If the handler stops, or slowsdown, the dog will likely do so also. So the handler should be running to direct the dog;the dog will run alongside.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 29 March, 2001

    Advanced Beginners Class Plan – Week One

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    6

    Both black and white sequences should be run twice in the direction indicated by thenumbers. If you have time, you should also run them twice in the opposite direction.

    White Numbers – This is a nice down and back sequence without any tricky turns. In thissequence you want to work with your students on one simple handling skill: the handlershould stay in motion. The handler should use his lead hand to focus the dog on the pathahead when the dog comes out of the pipe tunnel. As soon as the dog’s attention is on thehandler’s lead, the handler must take off running, past and through the jumps. The handlershould not stop at the jumps to present to the dog.

    Your students should be offering the dog a foot tidbit in the down contact for everyrepetition. This encourages the dog to come to a stop at the bottom.

    Black Numbers – This is a big romping sequence around the outside of the building. Usethis sequence to get your students to run and point the way to their dogs. This sequenceshould also be used to begin developing a simple, but important, handling discipline. Each ofthe turns in this sequence are shaped by tunnels. The handler must continue working to thetunnels until the dog gets in. If the handler turns away from the tunnel entry prematurely, thedog will likely do so as well. The handler’s lead is a tool to point the way for the dog. Thelead hand should be held out steadily, pointing the way for the dog. In contrast, the lead handshould not be flailed about or offered in choppy little bursts.

    Your students should be offering the dog a foot tidbit in the down contact for everyrepetition. This encourages the dog to come to a stop at the bottom.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 30 March, 2001

    Advanced Beginners Class Plan 2 of 2

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    23

    45

    5

    Both black and white sequences should be run twice in the direction indicated by the numbers. Ifyou have time, you should also run them twice in the opposite direction.

    White Numbers – On the table work with your students on alternate repetitions to begin theirdogs in a down and sitting positions. Don’t waste a lot of class time with dogs that haven’t beentrained adequately at home. Remind your students that they need to be working on theseperformances at home (and not taking up class time to do so).

    In this sequence you want to talk to your students about the timing of a turn. The dog turns whenthe handler turns. Therefore, the handler should make a turn after a jump only when the dog isactually over the jump. To turn prematurely will cause the dog to drop the bar or run around thejump. It might actually work against the handler in this sequence to take a lead-out from thetable, as that strategy could have the handler standing still alongside the jump waiting on the dog.The dog takes his motion cue from the handler. Consequently the handler should be in motion.

    Your students should be offering the dog a foot tidbit in the down contact for every repetition.This encourages the dog to come to a stop at the bottom.

    Black Numbers – This sequence features a 180° turn from jump #2 to #3. The handling skill thatyou want to teach your students is that there is no obstruction to their movement past the jump.There is no invisible barrier, nothing to bump their noses on at a jump. Therefore, they shouldnot stop at the jump, expecting the dog to go ahead over the jump, when they have not. Not onlyis there little risk for working through and past the jump, but it is good handling to do so. Makethe turn only after the dog has committed over the jump.

    In a turn the handler should make a big deal of the turn. A happy and high pitched verbal will getthe dog’s attention. Taking off in the new direction will entice the dog to do so as well.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 31 March, 2001

    Novice Class Plan – Week One

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    White Numbers – This sequence starts with a discrimination problem at the #3 pipe tunnel.A U-shaped pipe tunnel is always a discrimination problem, but we cannot rely simply on thename of the obstacle… because both sides of the tunnel have the same name. We’ll have totry handling. The easy approach to solving the opposite side entry to the pipe tunnel will be apost and tandem. As the dog commits over jump #2 the handler will roll the dog left, in apost turn, as though heading to jump #4. Then, at the last moment the handler kicks out,pushing the dog to the correct entry to the tunnel. We experiment a great deal with bothoutside arm and inside arm as a tandem turn indicator. Try the inside arm first. Many dogsfind this completely natural and compelling.

    Out of the pipe tunnel the handler probably should switch to a right lead.

    Black Numbers – The sequence opens with a straight ahead sweep. Make sure that yourstudents work the down contact of the A-frame. They should not just plunge ahead withoutseeing their dogs feet in the down contact. It might also be a good practice in Novicecompetition class to give the dog a food treat in the down-side yellow.

    Following jump #4 is a tough turn to the weave poles. A novice handler’s instinct might be tokeep the dog on a left lead and kick out on the landing side of jump #4. Your job will be topoint out to your students that the intrepid handler will always endeavor to be on the turningside of the course. So they should have dog on right. The handler’s motion on the landingside of the jump should be compelling; and the turn will not be as effective if the handlerrelies on verbals only. You could show your students a Mitchell Flip, which would be a goodsolution for this turn.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 32 March, 2001

    Novice Class Plan 2 of 4

    1

    2

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    4

    51

    2

    3

    4

    5

    White Numbers – This sequence starts with the opposite side of the tunnel than the dogwas previously directed. The handler must be prepared to push the dog up to the correctentry. Another approach, to ensure the entry to the correct side of the tunnel, would be forthe handler to do a crossing turn, or possibly even a blind turn, on the tipping side of theteeter. This puts the dog on handler’s left, and makes the right side of the pipe tunnelmore compelling to the dog.

    Out of the pipe tunnel this sequence features short transitional distances to jump #4 and tothe table at #5. In the turn to the table the handler simply needs to make sure the dog hascommitted over the jump before indicating the change of direction. A simple post turnmight not be enough to turn the dog to the table, as the dummy jump beyond could bequite compelling. The transition from the pipe tunnel to the table at #5 might be betterserved by a crossing turn on the landing side of jump #4.

    Black Numbers – This sequence will test two turning skills, the post, and the tandem.The turn from jump #2 to #3 is a post. Certainly the dog will see the pipe tunnel ahead,but has no real reason to go there if the handler is turning and calling to jump #3. This ofcourse puts the dog on the handler’s left lead, which is away from the turn on the landingside of jump #4. So the turn to the pipe tunnel at #5 will be a tandem. That is, the handlerkicks out, pointing with an inside arm, to turn the dog away.

    Another solution to this sequence would be for the handler to do a blind turn on thelanding side of jump #3. That puts the dog on the handler’s right, and makes the approachto the pipe tunnel a post turn.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 33 March, 2001

    Novice Class Plan 3 of 4

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    2

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    White Numbers – This sequence starts with a long sweep up to jump #3. The handlerprobably will want a modest lead out in order to get in position for the turn from jump #3to the pipe tunnel. This really shouldn’t be a difficult turn. But the handler needs to be inposition in order to kick the dog into the pipe tunnel. However, the handler must becareful not to come into contact with the dog. This is a bit of a tandem turn. The easiestway to accomplish the turn is to point into the tunnel while making the corner.

    Out of the pipe tunnel the dog must be turned down to jump #5. The handler needs to geta connection with the dog and focus the dog on the approach to jump #5. A good way tohandle this would be to do a crossing turn as the dog comes out of the pipe tunnel. This isactually hard to teach Novice students. Many will want to rotate through the turn whilethe dog is engaged in the tunnel. Of course, the dog can’t actually see the rotation of thehandler’s body while in the tunnel, so it couldn’t be very compelling.

    Black Numbers – A handler working his dog on the right through early part of thissequence might get into a bit of trouble in the approach to the pipe tunnel at #3. If the doggets over jump #2 before the handler can get into position, which is very likely, the dogwill curl back towards the handler’s position, which presents the wrong side of the tunnelto the dog. It would be better to work the dog on a left lead, to influence the dog into thecorrect side of the tunnel.

    Remember that a dog coming out of a pipe tunnel is often disoriented. The handler mustestablish a connection with the dog and focus the dog on the path to the tire. Continue towork with praise and a treat for the dog in the descent-side contact of the A-frame.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 34 March, 2001

    Novice Class Plan 4 of 4

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    White Numbers – In this sequence the handler wants to get the dog past the first entry tothe tunnel at #3. The easy way to do this turn is as a post and tandem. The handler’sinitial movement will be as though to turn down towards jump #4. As the dog gets pastthe wrong entry to the tunnel, the handler flips back in a tandem (using the inside arm toindicate the turn).

    Out of the pipe tunnel the dog is faced with a flat turn to the table on the landing side ofjump #4. There really isn’t anything on this side of the sequence that presents itself as anoff-course opportunity. Even the teeter is faced the wrong direction. So the turn shouldn’tbe especially difficult. You might want to watch for handlers who come to a completestop at the table while waiting for the dog. When the handler stops the dog is apt to stopas well. So the handler’s job will be to find a way to stay in motion to direct the dog tothe table.

    Black Numbers – This sequence starts in a relatively straight forward line. Though jump#2 is presented at a depressed angle to the dog’s approach, the handler should have notrouble working through and getting the dog into the correct entry to the tunnel. It doesn’tmuch matter which side the handler works the dog.

    The real fun in this sequence will be the turn from jump #4 to jump #5. This is a veryloose threadle. Threadles always require a combination turn; post to tandem; or cross topost; or even, blind to blind. Let your students experiment a bit. Be ready to specifyhandling if they make this look especially ungainly. Though, something to keep at theback of your mind, when you have a choice of directions to turn a dog on a jump, thehandler should assess the risks and benefits of turning the dog in either direction.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 35 March, 2001

    Competition Class Plan – Week One

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    White Numbers – The approach to jump #2 requires the handler to make a turn with the dog onthe flat. One solution for the opening would be for the handler to start this sequence with a post(from #1 to #2) followed by a tandem (on the landing side of jump #2). When the dog in on theteeter the handler will often work closely alongside the dog. This might result in the handlerbeing behind the dog and out of real control of the dog’s approach to the pipe tunnel at #5. Itwould be worthwhile practicing this opening in a different way. Try starting with a lead-out-pivot(crossing turn). After the dog is pitched over jump #2 the handler stays in a parallel path to thedog, on the opposite side of the table. The handler must stay in motion parallel to the dog. Thisputs the handler well ahead of the dog and able to easily direct the dog into the correct side of thepipe tunnel.

    The final challenge is the approach to a depressed angle tire at #8. The handler will likely wantto keep dog on left, bringing the dog up enough on the landing side of jump #7 to do a tandem onthe flat to create the approach to the tire.

    Black Numbers – This sequence starts off with a simple sweep into the pipe tunnel. The turnfollowing jump #4, however, will have the dog looking at an off-course up the A-frame. It will bein the handler’s interest to be compelling in this turn. An RFP should do the trick.

    The approach to jump #7 is anything but straight ahead. The handler could post the dog out ofthe tunnel around for the approach to jump #7, and probably have a pretty good approach to jump#8. It would probably be better that the handler engages in some movement to bring the dog upfor the approach to jump #7 in a way that a nice line to #8 is created in the process. The besthandling might be a blind turn. Though a crossing turn would surely work if the handler isthoughtful about the place it is committed.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 36 March, 2001

    Competition Class Plan 2 of 4

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    White Numbers – Surely your students will want to turn the dog right on the landing sideof the tire at #2. This presents the dogwalk as an off-course opportunity. So the secret willbe to keep the dog turning. A crossing turn will be most compelling to the dog.

    In this sequence the dog gets the straight ahead approach to the pipe tunnel at #5. Thecourse stops being straight ahead on the landing side of jump #7. The dummy jumpbeyond will be very compelling to the dog if the handler can’t make the turn up to thetable at #8. An RFP would be useful. In this kind of turn you have to watch that yourstudents allow the dog to commit over the jump before indicating the turn. Otherwisethey’ll risk a downed bar or a refusal at #7. They might possibly pull the dog off the jumpaltogether.

    Black Numbers – After patterning the dogs to the straight ahead tire in the previoussequence, don’t be surprised if the dogs decide they want to go the same way in thissequence. Though this is a simple post turn it is the handler’s responsibility to get a goodconnection with the dog to show the new way. The approach to the pipe tunnel at #5could be handled well in a couple different ways. Slow dog handling would have thehandler moving forward and doing a blind turn on the landing side of jump #3. Fast doghandling has the handler keeping the dog on a left lead through jump #4, and doing atandem turn on the landing side of that jump.

    This sequence ends with a turn from jump #6 to #7 with a compelling off-courseopportunity to the pipe tunnel, followed by a wicked turn on the landing side of jump #7into the weave poles. The handler will have to be dramatic for the final turn. Once again,a Mitchell Flip might be the most compelling movement to convince the dog to turn.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 37 March, 2001

    Competition Class Plan 3 of 4

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    White Numbers – This sequence begins with a long transitional distance from jump #1 to#2. Given the short path into the pipe tunnel at #4 the handler will likely want a lead outbetween jumps #1 and #2 in order to be in position to kick the dog on into the pipe tunnel.This sequence closes with a long sweep out of the pipe tunnel that will really have the dogsmoving. Again we are faced with the depressed angle approach to the tire at #7. This time,the approach is complicated by a turn following, to get to jump #8. This is actually acombination of elements of two previous exercises. Again, a tandem on the flat might be thebest approach to the tire. This time the handler might want to square it up a bit in order tohave a clean turn (to the right) for an approach to jump #8. If the off-course potential to thedogwalk seems too severe, the handler could turn the dog left on the landing side of the #7tire, and make a cross and post approach to jump #8.

    Black Numbers – This sequence features the turn out of the tunnel to jump #3 that we sawin an earlier sequence. The real difference, in this sequence, is that the course turns to theweave poles, and not to jump #1. Handling the approach to jump #3 in a post position (dogon right) would be a bit out of control for the approach to the weave poles. So the handlerwill want to do a blind turn or a crossing turn on the takeoff side of jump #3 to be in positionto post the dog into the weave poles. The handler will have to be completely compelling inthe turn to avoid the off-course at jump #1.

    The approach to the pipe tunnel at #6 will have to be handled with a two part movement. Apost and tandem might be the best way to handle it. However, modifying the dog’s approachto jump #5 might not be a bad thought. (This is typically called a “Vee”). The handler cankick the dog out, as though heading to the tire, and then turn the dog for an approach to jump#5 that also gives the dog a straight line approach to the pipe tunnel at #6.

  • JFF Notebook Week 1 Page 38 March, 2001

    Competition Class Plan 4 of 4

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    White Numbers – Again we have the long sweep across the building. This time theopposite side of the tunnel is indicated. While this might be the more natural approach forthe dog, the fact that we conditioned the dog for a turn in the first entry in the previousexercise might have an influence on the dog’s choice. This most likely should be handledas a post and tandem. That means that the handler starts with the dog on a left lead

    The final sequence will be interesting. The handler must take the dog off the table for ashort approach to a jump presented at a depressed angle. This approach is complicated bythe turn and approach to the tire at #8. We should observe the Keep It Simple principle inhis final sequence.

    Black Numbers – This sequence starts with a difficult approach to the weave poles at #2,coming off a turn from jump #1. What we’ll probably find is that a post turn causes tooloopy of a turn and will have the dog missing the entry, or blowing around pole #3because the approach was too perpendicular. What the handler wants to do is square upthe entry a bit. That means a crossing turn in which the handler wraps the dog around hisbody for the approach. This has to be done carefully, with a lot of connection, else thedog might be directed to a back jump of jump #1.

    The final serpentine is just a bit of fun. It starts with a threadle from jump #5 to #6.Remember that a threadle is always a combination turn; cross to post, or cross to blind toname a couple possibilities. It all depends on how the handler wants to approach the finalserpentine, on the blind side, or on the tandem side.

  • JFF Notebook Week 2 Page 39 March, 2001

    Week Two – Time and Score

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    This course is based on the fourth round AKC Nationals course designed by Diane Craig. Myapologies for the liberties taken to make this course fit into a 60’ by 90’ space. The most criticalchallenges were preserved; though they may be a bit tighter than the course designer intended.

    BriefingTime and Score is run like a standard agility course. The dog is required to perform eachobstacle on the course. However, the dog may start the course over again if there is timeremaining on the clock after his first time through. The dog will accumulate points foreach obstacle successfully completed.

    The Standard Course Time shall be 60 seconds. At the end of course time, the timekeeperwill blow a whistle indicating the end of scoring. From wherever they are on course, thehandler and dog must go directly to the finish line to stop the clock. Time and Score isscored points, then time. Time is used as a tie-breaker only.

    The dog earns 1 point for obstacles successfully completed, and loses 1 point for eachfault incurred (dropped bar, off-course, missed contact). USDAA Starters/Novice ruleswill be used for judging. Failure to perform will be faulted 5 points.

    Marking Your JFF Dance Cards• Games I – A Score of 15 or better• Games II – A score of 18 or better• Games III – A score of 20 or better

  • JFF Notebook Week 2 Page 40 March, 2001

    Beginners Class Plan – Week Two

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    Side Two

    Remind your students to give the dog a food reward for all performances. The reward,both treat and praise for the dog, should be given immediately as the dog performs theobstacle or sequence.

    Sequencing – If you have enough time after introducing the obstacles in your groups, youcan try a short, two-obstacle, sequences. Dogs at this point in their training aren’t reallyready for sequences. It is important to give a lot of reward for each performance. Forexample. You might do the jump several times, and the A-frame. The dog gets a rewardfor each repetition. So when you start sequencing, begin the jump in the direction of theA-frame, as the dog gets over the jump, immediately move forward to the A-frame tomake the presentation; and give the dog a reward at the bottom of the A-frame.

    Side OneReview the dogwalk – We’ll have our new adjustable dogwalk up, with the top set atabout 3’. The handler works over the dogwalk with the dog, using a food treat to lure ifnecessary. The handler should alternate working the dog on both left and right. A lot ofpraise and an immediate food reward at the bottom of the dogwalk will make the dog alot more confident and willing to climb up over this obstacle.

    Introducing the Teeter – We’ll have the training seesaw out, with walls on either side sothat the dog cannot bail off the side. We build the walls with two large cardboard boxeson either side of the teeter. Picket-style jump wings bridge the gap between the cardboardboxes. So this forms a bit of a canyon for the dog, and really doesn’t give the doganywhere to escape once he’s committed to the perilous journey over the ramp.

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    Remember our methodology is never to compelthe dog. On the introduction, the instructor willhold the dog’s leash while the handler goes tothe other side to call the dog over. If the dogtries to go right or go left, around the seesaw,you will check the dog’s motion. If the dogvolunteers to get to his human by going over theseesaw, then you will just let the leash slipthrough your fingers. You must control thedescent of the board so that it doesn’t dropsuddenly, or with a bang.

    Introducing the Long Jump/Spread Hurdle – In Beginners class we combine the longjump and spread hurdle. The performance of each is essentially the same.

    The goal is to teach the dog to stretch in the jump as the handler shows the way. Showyour students how to square up your body as you show the jump to the dog. Don’t turnsideways. The dog gets his direction cue from the set of the handler’s shoulders. Face thejump and move directly alongside of it, showing the path the dog should work with thelead hand, the hand closest to the dog. As the handler passes alongside the standard, thedog goes over the hurdle.

    The introduction to the jump should be done with the dog off-lead. Each presentationshould have a slightly longer approach than might be necessary with a bar jump.

    1. Working with the dog on the handler’s left, show the dog the hurdle.

    2. Working the dog on the handler’s right, show the dog the hurdle.

    3. The handler leaves the dog in a sit or down stay and moves to the opposite side of thejump. The leash should drape over the jump bar. If the dog won’t stay, you’ll want tohold the dog while the handler moves.

    4. Repeat steps 1 through 3 several times.

    Review the Tire – Set the tire so that the bottom of the inside aperture is no more than 6”off the ground.

    Let the handlers present the tire to the dog themselves. Put the dog through on thehandler’s right. Put the dog through on the handler’s left. Leave the dog in a sit or a downstay, and call the dog through.

    If the dog is having trouble with the tire, you will control the dog’s leash on the initialpresentation of the tire. The handler should go to the opposite side and call the dogthrough. If the dog tries to duck left or right the instructor will stop the dog’s progress. Ifthe dog volunteers to get to his handler through the tire, then the instructor just allows thelead to slip through his hands.

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    Review the table – Begin each group by having your students show you their “sit” as agroup. Have them sit their dogs, go to the end of the leash, facing the dog. After amoment, have them return to their dogs. Exercised finished. Give them a pep talk aboutworking the Sit command at home. Ask your students how many of them did theirhomework assignment from week one.

    We teach the Happy Table exercise. No harsh obedience-style sitting of the dog will beallowed. Remember how this works. Put a treat in the fist. Put the dog up on the table.Rock the fist past the dog’s ear, telling the dog Sit! As soon as the dog sits, open the fist.Dogs are very clever about this game. It should be upbeat and reward based.

    Side TwoReview the pipe tunnel – Allow your students to present the pipe tunnel to the dog. Startwith the tunnel shortened, but quickly add length and bend to the tunnel as the dogs begindoing the tunnel with confidence.

    If any dog is having trouble with the pipe tunnel, you should hold the dog’s leash whilethe handler goes to the other side to call the dog through. If the dog tries to go right or goleft, around the tunnel, you will check the dog’s motion. If the dog volunteers to get to hishuman by going through the tunnel, then you will just let the leash slip through yourfingers.

    Introducing the Collapsed Tunnel – The chute of the collapsed tunnel should be foldedback on itself so that the fabric chute is only about 4’ long. Our methodology is never tocompel the dog. The instructor holds the dog’s leash while the handler goes to the otherside to lift the fabric and make a connection with the dog, and then call the dog through.If the dog tries to go right or go left, around the tunnel, you will check the dog’s motion.If the dog volunteers to get to his human by going through the tunnel, then you will justlet the leash slip through your fingers.

    On subsequent repetitions, the handler should make the presentation of the collapsedtunnel while the instructor holds the fabric chute open. As the dog’s confidence grows,gradually add length to the fabric chute, and begin dropping the chute on the dog earlierand earlier until the dog is pushing through the chute without anyone holding it open.

    Introducing a Winged Hurdle – It is the nature of a wing that it puts a bit of distancebetween the dog and handler. Don’t immediately assume that the dog will go over the barrather than around the wing to be close to the handler. When introducing a winged hurdlethe initial presentation should have the handler straddling the bar and luring the dog overthe bar with the arm opposite the dog. Next, change the presentation so that the dog is leftaddressing the jump while the handler goes to the opposite side. Use a lure if necessaryand call the dog straight over the center of the bar. This presentation should be made bothon the dog’s left and the dog’s right.

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    Review the A-frame – The A-frame will be set at about 3’. Get everyone to load up withfood. Put the dog over on the handler’s right. Put the dog over on the handler’s left.Please do not use any form of compulsion to get the dog over. Use a lure if necessary.Use a lot of praise and reward for each trip the dog takes over the A-frame.

    If any dog is having trouble with the A-frame you can take extraordinary measures. Holdthe dog’s leash. Then instruct the handler to go around to the opposite side of theA-frame, and then climb up so that the dog can only see the handler’s hands and face.Don’t allow the dog to run around the A-frame. But if the dog volunteers to go up, let himgo.

    Review the Weave Poles – The weave poles will be fully wired. Tonight we are onlygoing to only a few repetitions of this obstacle, a couple on the handler’s right, and acouple on the handler’s left. The dog must be on leash, with the handler’s inside armholding the leash or collar so that the dog can not jump over or duck under the wires. Wedo not want to compel the dog through the wires. We want the dog to pick his ownfootsteps. The dog can be lured with food to help him make those footsteps.

    Review the bar jump – Use a non-winged bar jumps for this review. The bars should becrossed in the jump standards, with one end in the 8” cup, and the other on the ground.

    The review of the jump should be done with the dog on lead.

    1. Working with the dog on the handler’s left, show the dog the jump.

    2. Working the dog on the handler’s right, show the dog the jump.

    3. The handler leaves the dog in a sit or down stay and moves to the opposite side of thejump. The leash should drape over the jump bar. If the dog won’t stay, you’ll want tohold the dog while the handler moves.

    4. Repeat steps 1 through 3 several times.

  • JFF Notebook Week 2 Page 44 March, 2001

    Advanced Beginners Class Plan – Week Two

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    Black Numbers – This is a nice down-and-back sequence. Talk to your students aboutfocusing their dogs on the line ahead when they come out of a tunnel. Note that the wingsof jump #2 may hold the handler up a bit and cause the dog to wrap back towards thehandler’s position. The handler needs to set up a path that pushes the dog towards thejump and to the pipe tunnel beyond. That path should be outside of the wing, and nottowards the wing. By definition, a wing is an obstruction to the handler.

    This sequence is also a good opportunity to work on a blind turn. The handler approachesthe pipe tunnel with dog on right. During the dog’s performance of the tunnel the handlerwill turn in the same direction as the turn of the tunnel, picking up the dog on a left leadas the dog exits the tunnel.

    White Numbers – In this sequence we’re using the equipment storage jump (acombination of the long jump and double-bar hurdle). The handler should take a modestlead-out in the sequence. It’s important that the handler not be caught standing still at thelong jump. A Novice dog will jump better if the handler is providing a good motion cue.That means that the handler should be moving briskly in a path that parallels the dog’spath.

    In this sequence watch that the handler does not develop a habit of turning off or awayfrom the entry to the pipe tunnel before the dog has committed into the tunnel. This is animportant handling discipline. The handler should stay focused on and pointing to thetunnel until the dog gets in. There is no advantage to turning away towards the exit beforethe dog has made the entry.

  • JFF Notebook Week 2 Page 45 March, 2001

    Advanced Beginners Class Plan 2 of 4

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    Black Numbers – In this sequence the dog must be redirected coming out of the pipetunnel at #3 back to jump #4. In this sequence we’d like to work on a crossing turn.Please read the discussion of the crossing turn in the white numbers exercise on this page.

    Work the A-frame in both directions giving the dog a foot treat in the down contact.While we do want to encourage the dog’s enthusiasm for working at top speed, we alsowant to teach the dog that the contact obstacles must be performed in a controlledfashion. If the handler’s stopping at the down contact is not enough to quell the dog’senthusiasm for launching off the board, you might get the handler to turn back towardsthe dog as the dog comes down the ramp. This often is enough, as it will indicate an endto the forward foot race. If this is not enough, get the handler to turn back towards the dogand reach up and put his hands on the dog, to gentle the dog down into the contact.

    White Numbers – This sequence is similar to the previous in all regards, except the turncoming out of the pipe tunnel. The handler really cannot run ahead during the dog’sperformance of the pipe tunnel. He has to stay to direct the dog out of the pipe tunnel tothe tire at #4. In this turn you should get your students to practice a crossing turn. Ideally,the handler will be facing the same direction as the dog when the dog comes out of thetunnel, and at that instant, begin the cross. The entire rotation of the crossing turn is savedfor the benefit of the dog. Doing the rotation while the dog is in the tunnel deprives thedog of actually seeing this compelling movement. This is very hard to get novice handlersto actually do.

    Once the dog has been redirected to the tire at #4 the handler needs to get into motion andrun through the final two obstacles.

  • JFF Notebook Week 2 Page 46 March, 2001

    Advanced Beginners Class Plan 3 of 4

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    Black Numbers – This is a fairly advanced handling sequence for Advanced Beginners.But you should still have a bit of fun with it. The handler could manage this sequencekeeping his dog on left all