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K–12 EDUCATOR’S GUIDE

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  • K–12 EDUCATOR’S GUIDE

  • Quick Tips • The exhibit entrance is located on the upper level of the Mandell Center. To enter the exhibit, your

    group will walk up a ramp from the main atrium near the Amazing Machine exhibit.

    • When you exit the exhibit, you will be on the upper level of the Karabots Pavilion which connects

    to the third floor of the main Science Center through the Sir Isaac’s Loft exhibit.

    • On average, most groups will spend about 40 minutes in the exhibit, if carefully examining all of

    the displays. There is no re-entry allowed. Restrooms are located near the exhibit entrance in the

    Bartol Atrium behind the elevators. There are no restrooms inside the exhibit.

    • No food or beverages are allowed in any of the exhibit galleries.

    During your visit, students will: ✔ Encounter seven animatronic dinosaurs as

    well as live actors in theatrical settings.✔ Interact with devices that help explain the

    science behind the movie.

    After your visit, students will: ✔ Think about the ethical consequences of

    genetic modifications.✔ Be curious to learn more about the how

    paleontologists recreate the past.

    K–12 EDUCATOR’S GUIDE

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 2

  • JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 3

    About the Exhibit The Franklin Institute is pleased to host JURASSIC WORLD: THE EXHIBITION.

    Your students will get closer to dinosaurs than they ever have before in Jurassic World: The Exhibition!

    Based on one of the biggest blockbusters in cinematic history, the Exhibition immerses audiences of all

    ages in scenes inspired by the beloved film. Now, the park that was only a promise comes to life…right

    before your eyes. Travel to Isla Nublar as a VIP guest and explore Jurassic World. Stare in wonder at a

    towering Brachiosaurus, come face-to-face with a Velociraptor, and get a rare up-close look at the most

    vicious dinosaur of them all, Tyrannosaurus rex. Created in close collaboration with renowned paleontologist

    Jack Horner, the Exhibition is infused with interactive educational elements—drawn from the real-world

    science of dinosaur DNA that allowed Jurassic World to come to life. Visitors of all ages can now learn all

    about these incredible prehistoric creatures.

    How to Prepare The exhibition features theatrical elements that may be startling to some students. Students should be

    prepared for loud noises, strobe lighting, mist, and sudden movements. As in the film, there are dinosaur

    battle scenes which some students may find unsettling.

    Chaperones and students should know that the museum encourages conversation around the displays and

    children should ask questions and discuss what they see. Museum etiquette suggests that the conversation

    be kept to an appropriate indoor volume level.

    Running through the exhibit is not allowed. Designate a meeting location within the exhibit when you arrive

    in case someone gets separated. Please do not congregate at the entrance/exit, however, so as to enable

    other guests to enter and exit easily.

    There are no restrooms inside the exhibit and there is no re-entry allowed, so plan ahead and use the

    restrooms in the main Bartol Atrium before entering.

    Note that the exhibit’s exit is through a gift shop which features items related to the exhibition at many

    price levels—from small souvenirs to more expensive collectible items. Be prepared to direct your students

    accordingly to allow them time to shop or to proceed directly through to your next destination.

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 3

  • JURASSIC WORLD EDUCATOR GUIDEIntroduction to the Exhibition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

    Next Generation Science Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

    NGSS Cross Cutting Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

    The Exhibition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    AREA 100 | Intro Theater . . . . . . . . . 6Activity: Ethics in Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

    Ethics Cards for Ethics in Science | ACTIVITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

    AREA 200 | Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . 9Activity: How’s The Climate? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

    What’s The Climate | HANDOUT . . . . . . . . . . . 11

    AREA 300 | Gentle Giants Petting Zoo . . . . . . . . . 13Activity: Whose Scat is That? . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

    Whose Scat is That? | WORKSHEET . . . . . . . . 16

    AREA 400 | Hammond Creation Center . . . . . . . . . 17Activity: Whose Blood is That? . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

    Whose Blood is That? | WORKSHEET . . . . . . . 19

    AREA 500 | T. Rex Kingdom Welcome Area . . . . . . 20Activity: The Fiercest Animal on Earth . . . . . 20

    The Fiercest Animal on Earth | WORKSHEET . . 22

    AREA 600 | T. Rex Kingdom Feeding Experience . . 23Activity: My Creature’s Offspring . . . . . . . . . . 23

    My Creature’s Offspring | WORKSHEET . . . . . 25

    AREA 700 | Gyrosphere Valley . . . . 26Activity: The Hidden Dinosaur . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

    The Hidden Dinosaur | WORKSHEET . . . . . . . . 28

    AREA 800 | Innovation Center . . . . 29Activity: Preventing Extinction . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

    AREA 900 | Scientific Epilogue . . . . 31Activity: Jurassic World Pre & Post Reflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

    Jurassic World Pre & Post Reflection | WORKSHEET . . . . . . . . 33

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 4

  • Introduction to the ExhibitionWhat would it be like to live in a world where dinosaurs actually roamed free? How would they behave? What

    would they do? How would you interact with them? The movie Jurassic World explored these questions and in

    JURASSIC WORLD: THE EXHIBITION you will be able to experience firsthand what it’s like to visit an island

    inhabited by these giant creatures. You and your students will become completely immersed in scenes inspired

    by Jurassic World, from taking the ferry to the island, to visiting a science and innovation lab, to getting up

    close and personal with a T.rex! This exhibition will thrill students and spark their interest to learn more about

    how dinosaurs lived, evolved, and can even possibly be cloned! Visit our website for more information at

    JurassicWorldTheExhibition.com.

    Included in This GuideTo engage with the Exhibition, teachers can choose what will best fit students’ needs and interests.

    This guide contains:

    ☞Essential questions to ask students while touring the Exhibition.

    ☞Nine lesson plans with hands-on activities, many of which can be completed at school or while visiting the Exhibition, including:

    ➢ Debriefing questions to help students reflect on the lessons

    ➢ Grade level adaptations for more, or less, complex lessons to allow teachers to modify

    activities to all levels.

    INTRODUCTION TO THE EXHIBITION

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 5

  • Activity NameETHICS IN SCIENCE

    OverviewIn this activity, students are given a list of several controversial issues in science and society and are asked

    to discuss the pros and cons of each. The goal for this first activity is for students to open their minds and to

    think about some of the unintended consequences of our actions.

    Cross Cutting ConceptCause and Effect

    Materials ListEthics Cards, Student journal

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

    Why would we want to clone a dinosaur?

    What are the pros and cons?

    What role do people play in controlling nature?

    Are there any limitations to what science should do?

    AREA 100 | INTRO THEATER

    (Continued on page 7)

    The Exhibition There are 9 main areas in JURASSIC WORLD: THE EXHIBITION. This guide provides you with essential

    questions to ask students as you are visiting each area and a lesson that explores and expands on the

    ideas presented in each.

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    Procedure | (Continued from page 6)

    ✔ Complete this activity before you go to JURASSIC WORLD: THE EXHIBITION or before leaving the

    ferry in the exhibition.

    ✔ Ask students if they could clone dinosaurs – would they? Ask students to share what are some of the

    reasons that it would be a good idea and what are some of the reasons it would be a bad idea. Record

    student responses on the board.

    ✔ Put students in pairs, assign one student in each group as a “pro” and one as a “con” and pass out the

    ethics cards.

    ✔ Read the first issue to the entire class “Is it right to cut down trees?” Have the “pro” student read the “pro”

    statement on the card and have the “con” student read the “con” statement on the card. After each student

    has read their card, have each group discuss the pros and cons and try to come to an agreement on whether

    they are for or against the statement.

    ✔ As a whole class, ask the pairs of students to share their thoughts.

    ✔ Repeat steps 3-5 with the remaining ethics cards.

    ✔ As a whole class, ask students to think about whether or not we should engineer dinosaurs again.

    Add any new ideas to the board.

    Grade Level Adaptations

    More advanced

    Give each pair of students just one card and time to

    research the topic, so they can learn more about the

    issue. After students have researched their topic, have

    them debate their issue in front of the class.

    Less advanced

    Read each card to the entire class and ask students

    for comments.

    Debrief • Ask students which of the topics was most interesting or controversial to them and have

    them explain why.

    • Discuss with students that while science cannot currently create dinosaurs, science has been able

    to clone sheep and other animals. While there are clearly some benefits to this, there are also some

    ethical questions that need to be considered.

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    Ethics Cards for Ethics in Science | ACTIVITY

    QUESTIONIs it a good idea to introduce

    an animal to a new environment?

    PRO“Yes! We can help animals find places where it is easier for them to live AND

    these new animals might love it there. “

    CON“No! Introducing animals to new areas

    causes unknown destruction! They might end up killing off the native plants

    and animals.”

    QUESTIONShould we breed dogs?

    PRO“Yes! By breeding dogs, we make sure we have the qualities we want. We can make dogs that are good hunters have a happy personality and are excellent protectors.”

    CON“No! By breeding dogs, we narrow the

    gene pool and increase a dog’s likelihood of getting certain illnesses. In addition, there are already plenty of good dogs

    that aren’t bred.”

    QUESTIONIs it right to cut down trees?

    PRO: “Yes! We need trees to build our homes.

    Plus, trees are a type of plant, so after we cut one down, another will grow.”

    CON: “No! Many animals use trees as their

    homes. If we cut them down, these animals won’t have a place to live. Also, trees help

    prevent global warming.”

    QUESTIONShould we let forest fires burn?

    PRO“Yes! Forest fires are natural and they

    help forests stay healthy by getting rid of dead trees and plants. If you put out all the fires, it actually hurts the forest.”

    CON“No! Forest fires cause animals to lose

    their homes, produce a lot of smog, and are dangerous!”

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 8

  • Activity NameHOW’S THE CLIMATE?

    OverviewIn the “Welcome Area,” students are immersed in the flora that existed during the Jurassic Period. Students

    should take time and observe the new world they’ve entered. This activity will challenge students to make

    inferences about the climate during the Jurassic period, based on flora surrounding them.

    Cross Cutting ConceptsPatterns

    Materials List: How’s the Climate | WORKSHEET

    Procedure✔ This activity should be done at the Exhibit.

    ✔ Ask students if the types of plants around the world are all the same or if they are different.

    Ask students to describe how plants are different in one location than in another.

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSWhat was the environment like during the time of dinosaurs?

    How was it different than our current climate?

    How were the plants and trees similar and different during the Jurassic era than they are now?

    What caused things to be different?

    (Continued on page 10)

    AREA 200 | WELCOME

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    Procedure | (Continued from page 9)

    ✔ Ask students why plants are different around the world and write their responses on the board.

    As students are responding guide them to include the following features:

    ✎ Temperature

    ✎ Amount of rainfall

    ✎ Seasons and the amount of sunlight

    ✎ Coverage (the density of plants)

    ✔ Tell students that they are going to have to predict what the climate was like during the Jurassic Period,

    based on their observations of the flora in the exhibit.

    ✔ Pass out the How’s the Climate worksheet and tell students that when they enter in the “Welcome Area”

    of the Exhibit, they will need to complete the handout based on their observations.

    ✔ For each of the 4 conditions (Rainfall, Temperature, Density of Plants, and Seasons), have the students

    select the image that is closest to what they see in the exhibit. When they are done, they should write a

    summary of what they think the climate is like.

    Grade Level Adaptations:

    More Advanced

    Have students study the Köppen climate classification

    and then try to assign the flora into a sub climate.

    Less Advanced

    Assign groups of students one category each. Have

    each group choose which type of climate they think

    it is and compare results.

    Debrief • Ask students to share their summaries of the climate in the Jurassic World.

    • Ask students to describe some of the challenges and limitations of this activity.

    • Discuss with students that in general, the climate during the Jurassic Period was warm, moist, and

    most like a tropical climate. However, the world was very different then and there is not a perfect

    comparison. Plus, just like today, the climate was not the same everywhere; so there is not one

    answer for what the climate was like during the Jurassic Period.

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 10

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    What’s the Climate? | HANDOUTDirections: Observe the plants around you. For each condition (Rainfall, Temperature, Density of Plants and Type of Season),

    circle the image that looks most like what you see.

    TEMPERATE TROPICAL POLAR ARID CONTINENTAL

    TEMPERATURE WARM HOT COLD HOT DAYS & COLD NIGHTSWARM DAYS & COLD NIGHTS

    DENSITY OF PLANTS DENSE VERY DENSE NOT DENSE NOT DENSE DENSE

    TYPE OF SEASONS

    DRY SUMMER & COLD WINTER

    RAINY & DRY SEASONS

    LONG WINTER, SHORT SUMMER

    NOT MUCH VARIATION

    THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

    HOT SUMMER & COLD WINTER

    RAINFALL MODERATE HEAVY VERY LITTLE VERY LITTLE MODERATE

    (Continued on page 12)JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 11

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    What’s Climate Change? - Handout | (Continued from page 11)

    Based on your findings, describe the following during the Jurassic Period:

    Rainfall:

    Temperature:

    Density:

    Type of Season:

    Write upBased on the data you’ve just collected, write of a summary describing the climate

    in the Jurassic Period in 50 - 100 words.

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 12

  • AREA 300 | GENTLE GIANTS PETTING ZOO

    Activity NameWHOSE SCAT IS THAT?!?

    OverviewIn the Gentle Giants Petting Zoo, students learn how scientists study dung (also called feces, poop and scat) to

    learn about animals. Dung or feces not only helps us to identify animal’s diet, it also tells us about their general

    health. Dung is also used to identify animals in the wild. In this activity, students will analyze the size and shape

    of dung in an attempt to identify animals.

    Cross Cutting ConceptStructure and Function

    Materials List:Whose Scat is That?!? | HANDOUT

    Procedure✔ After visiting the Gentle Giants Petting Zoo, ask students if they liked sticking their hand in an enormous

    pile of dung. Have them explain the experience and ask why doctors and scientists are so interested in

    studying feces and what they can learn.

    ✔ Tell students that today they are going to try to identify animals based on the size and shape of their dung.

    ✔ Ask students to think about all the types of feces they’ve seen in their lives and ask them to describe how

    the scat of one animal looks different than another animal’s. If needed, prompt students to think about the

    poop of their pet dog, cat, or animals they’ve seen on a farm and how it may vary in size and shape and

    what they can possibly learn.

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSWhy do scientists and doctors analyze animal feces?

    What are some ways to identify the types of animals that live in your area?

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    ✔ Ask students to explain why they think the scat of different animals looks different. Explain that it’s based

    mostly on what they eat and on how much they eat.

    ✔ Tell students that they are going to be challenged to identify an animal solely based on its scat by matching

    the scat pictured on the worksheet with the appropriate animal.

    ✔ Pass out the worksheet and go over all the possible types of animals from which they can choose, and

    before giving any further instruction, have students make a prediction of which scat is which.

    ✔ Ask students to describe how the scat looks similar and how it looks the different. Tell students that the

    first thing you need to identify about the scat is its shape. The shape lets you know if the animal is an

    herbivore, carnivore or omnivore.

    ✔ Tell students that a fun way to remember which is which is the ice cream rule.

    ✎ Omnivores scat is like a soft served ice cream cone

    ✎ Carnivores scat is like a traditional ice cream cone

    ✎ Herbivores scat is like the sprinkles on top of the cone.

    They can be different shapes but are generally in little pellets.

    ✔ Ask students to identify the animals on the worksheet as herbivore, carnivore, or omnivore and have

    students make new predictions about which scat is which.

    Animal Options:

    Mountain Lion | Carnivore

    Bear | Omnivore

    Goose | Omnivore

    Deer | Herbivore

    Coyote | Omnivore

    ✔ Explain that the other main identifier for scat is its size. Read the sizes of the scat and have students

    record the information on their worksheets.

    A. Row 1: 20 centimeters

    B. Row 2: 6.35 centimeters

    C. Row 3: 7.62 centimeters

    D. Row 4: each pellet ¼ 2.5 centimeters

    E. Row 5: 30.5 centimeters pile

    (Continued on page 15)JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 14

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    Procedure | (Continued from page 14)

    ✔ Have students make one last prediction of which scat is which and discuss

    a. Answer Key

    i. Row 1: Coyote

    ii. Row 2: Mountain Lion

    iii. Row 3: Goose

    iv. Row 4: Deer

    v. Row 5: Bear

    Grade Level Adaptations

    More Advanced

    Have students conduct their own research on how

    to identify scat. Instead of telling them about the

    importance of size and shape, have them work in

    groups to figure out how to identify the scat on

    their own.

    Less Advanced

    Have students work in groups to make predictions

    and update their worksheet.

    Debrief • Ask students to discuss how their predictions changed throughout the lessons and why?

    How did learning new information help them make better predictions?

    • Ask students if they are an herbivore, carnivore, or omnivore?

    Ask what type of ice cream does their poop look like?

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 15

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    Whose Scat is That?!? | WORKSHEETAnimal Options:Coyote | Mountain Lion | Goose | Dear | Bear

    SCAT PREDICTION 1 PREDICTION 2 SIZE PREDICTION 3

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 16

  • AREA 400 | HAMMOND CREATION CENTER

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSWhat can you learn from a drop of blood? What is in blood?

    How is the blood of one animal different than the blood of another?

    Activity NameWHOSE BLOOD IS THAT?

    OverviewThe basic principle of Jurassic World is that scientists were able to extract dinosaur DNA from an ancient

    mosquito and clone a dinosaur. In this activity, students ask the question: “How did they know they had dinosaur

    blood?” Every individual on earth has a distinct set of genes that identifies which species it is. In this activity,

    students are given a random sample of blood and asked to model what it’s like for scientists to try to decipher

    what type of animal’s blood they have.

    Cross Cutting ConceptPatterns

    Materials List: Whose Blood is That? | WORKSHEET

    Procedure:✔ Ask students to share what they know about genes (Genes not Jeans!)

    ✔ After students have had time to discuss their preconceived ideas, tell them that we are all

    a product of our genes; who we are and how we look is primarily based on the genes we get

    from our parents.

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    Procedure | (Continued from page 17)

    ✔ Ask students how genes are important to the story of Jurassic World. Discuss how the story is based on the

    idea that scientists analyze blood to determine from what animal the blood came. They then used that

    information to clone dinosaurs.

    ✔ Tell the students that they are going to pretend to be scientists who have just discovered some ancient

    blood. They are going to have to use their deductive skills to try to figure out what type of animal the blood

    came from.

    ✔ Pass out the “Whose Blood is That? | WORKSHEET”. Tell student that based on their analysis, they are able

    to identify 10 different traits about the animal (hair color, nose shape, etc.) Based on these traits, they need

    to determine which animal’s blood it is.

    ✔ Have students go through the list and sketch what each characteristic looks like.

    ✔ When students are done, have them sketch their entire animal, name the animal (it can be a real or imaginary

    animal), and share with the rest of the class.

    Debrief • Ask students to compare their animals with each other? Why do they look so different? Why do they

    look the same? Discuss how even though siblings have similar genes, they often look very different.

    • Ask students to discuss which animal’s blood they think that they have.

    Which animal on earth looks the closest to the one they drew?

    Grade Level Adaptations

    More advanced

    Have students make up more categories. Also, ask

    students to think of the opposite phenotype for the

    categories listed. Have students draw a creature with

    those characteristics.

    Less Advanced

    Have the class choose an animal whose blood they

    want to investigate. Have the students identify the

    phenotype for the animal from each of the categories

    on the worksheet.

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    Whose Blood is That? | WORKSHEET

    Draw final image of your animal and write a description:

    GENE

    EYE SHAPE

    EXTERIOR

    EYE COLOR

    BLOOD TYPE

    LEG TYPE

    EARS

    SIZE

    BEHAVIOR

    TYPE OF EATER

    PHENOTYPE

    ROUND

    FUR

    OVAL

    WARM BLOODED

    4-LEGGED

    LARGE & FACING FORWARD

    MID-SIZED

    TRAVEL IN PACKS

    OMNIVORE

    SKETCH

    JURASSIC WORLD Educator Guide | © Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. 2016 | 19

  • AREA 500 | T.REX KINGDOM WELCOME AREA

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSHow do animals protect themselves?

    How do animals try to scare other animals? What’s the point?

    What’s the fiercest animal alive today? What makes it so fierce?

    Activity NameTHE FIERCEST ANIMAL ON EARTH

    OverviewIn the “T.rex Welcome Area,” students are told that the T.rex is the fiercest animal on earth. In this activity,

    students will imagine what would be the fiercest animal on earth, if they could genetically develop whatever

    animal they wanted.

    Cross Cutting ConceptStructure and Function

    Materials ListThe Fiercest Animal On Earth | WORKSHEET, craft supplies

    Procedure✔ In the “T.rex Welcome Area,” students are told that during the time of dinosaurs, the T.rex was the fiercest

    animal on the planet. Ask students what “fierce” means and if they agree that the T.rex was the fiercest.

    Ask them how you would measure how “fierce” something is.

    ✔ Ask student to list “fierce” animals that are alive today. List them on the board.

    ✔ Ask students to list the characteristics of what makes these animals fierce. For example, teeth shape,

    type of roar, size, etc.

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    Procedure | (Continued from page 20)

    ✔ Remind students of the Whose Blood is That? activity and tell students that they are going to be creating a

    list similar to the one from that lesson. As a whole group, choose 5-7 of the categories listed on the board

    to focus on. List those on your worksheet.

    ✔ Put students into groups of 2-4. Tell them that they will need to develop the fiercest animal they can think of.

    For each of the 5-7 categories listed on their worksheet, each group should describe the fiercest phenotype

    and then sketch what it looks like.

    ✔ After groups have finished their worksheets, give groups craft material and have them make their creature,

    paying special attention to the 5-7 categories listed on their worksheet.

    ✔ Have the group present their animals to the class and read the descriptions of the 5-7 categories.

    Debrief • As a group discussion, ask students to compare their animals. Were they all the same or different?

    Why? If they were all asked to make the fiercest animal, why do they all look so different?

    • Tell students that in the next activity, they will have their creature mate with one of the creatures

    from another group. Ask them to discuss what they think the offspring will look like.

    Grade Level Adaptations

    More advanced

    Have students work individually and have them

    identify 8-10 different categories.

    Less advanced

    Narrow the categories to 2-3 and walk through

    all the steps together.

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    The Fiercest Animal On Earth | WORKSHEET

    Sketch of the fiercest animal on earth!

    GENE PHENOTYPE SKETCH

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  • AREA 600 | T.REX KINGDOM FEEDING EXPERIENCE

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSWhy do people all look different?

    Why do siblings often look alike?

    Why do you get some characteristics from your mother and some from your father?

    Activity Name: MY CREATURE’S OFFSPRING

    Overview: In this activity, groups of students will mate the creatures they made in the The Fiercest Animal On

    Earth activity to learn more about how genes are passed from parents to offspring.

    Cross Cutting Concept: Systems and system models

    Materials List: Creatures from The Fiercest Animal On Earth activity and My Creature’s Offspring Worksheet

    Procedure✔ Have students collect and re-present their creatures from The Fiercest Animal On Earth activity.

    Be sure that students describe the 5-7 features they focused on.

    ✔ Tell the students that these creatures have now grown up and need to find a mate, so that they

    can produce offspring.

    ✔ Pair groups of students and have them take out their The Fiercest Animal On Earth worksheet.

    Assign one group as the male and one group as the female.

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    Procedure | (Continued from page 23)

    ✔ Pass out the My Creature’s Offspring worksheet and give a coin to each group. Have them list the

    categories from The Fiercest Animal On Earth worksheet in the first column, then have the male

    group list their traits and the female list their traits.

    ✔ Explain to students that parents both pass their genes onto a child, BUT only one of the genes becomes

    dominate (or is visible.)

    ✔ Tell the students that they are going to have their creatures mate and explain that the creature’s

    looks will be determined by which genes become dominant.

    ✔ Ask each group to look at the first gene listed on their worksheet and read the description of the male

    and of the female.

    ✔ Have each group flip a coin and if it comes up heads, the offspring have the male gene and if it

    comes up tails, it has the female gene.

    ✔ Have groups repeat this process for the other genes listed on the worksheet.

    ✔ After assigning the gene, have students sketch and construct their new creature.

    ✔ If time allows, repeat steps 8-10 and create several offspring to demonstrate why offspring from

    the same parents can look so different.

    ✔ Have groups present their offspring , indicating how the offspring are similar and how they

    are different than their parents.

    Debrief • Ask students to describe how this activity models real life genetics.

    • Have students compare how the parents’ generation and the offspring’s generation look similar

    and/or different. Why is this?

    Grade Level Adaptations

    More Advanced

    Have students repeat the process by having offspring mate

    with other offspring. Discuss how the more mixing of genes

    there is, the more types of creatures there are.

    Less advanced

    Flip coins as a class and discuss the results after each flip.

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    My Creature’s Offspring | WORKSHEET

    GENE

    Sketch of Offspring

    MALE HEADS/TAILSFEMALE SKETCH

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  • AREA 700 | GYROSPHERE VALLEY

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSWhy are some animals camouflaged?

    How can being camouflaged be an advantage for both a predator and a prey?

    When would it be a disadvantage to be camouflaged?

    Activity Name: THE HIDDEN DINOSAUR

    OverviewCamouflage is one of the most common adaptations seen in animals. People often think of camouflage as only

    a way for prey to hide from predators. However, in this activity, students will learn that camouflage a great

    adaptation for predators to sneak up on prey!

    Cross Cutting ConceptStructure and Function

    Materials ListPaper, crayons, double sided tape, black cut out of Indominus rex

    Procedure✔ Ask students what camouflage is and ask them to list any animals that they know are camouflaged.

    Ask students why these animals are camouflaged.

    ✔ Students will most likely say that animals are camouflaged to hide from prey, but ask them

    why would a predator also be camouflaged.

    ✔ Remind them of their experience in the Gyrosphere Valley and how the Indominus rex was hiding

    behind the log before attacking!

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    Procedure | (Continued from page 26)

    ✔ Tell students that they are going to try to design an Indominus rex that is as camouflaged as possible.

    ✔ Pass out a blank sheet of paper and allow students to choose 4 different colors of crayon.

    ✔ Have students draw shapes (regular or irregular) on their paper using their crayons. They should keep

    about 1 cm space between shapes. Have students color the shapes using the crayons they selected.

    They can mix and match the colors however they like.

    ✔ Pass out the Indominus rex cut out and have students color it with the same colors they used to

    make their shapes.

    ✔ Give students a couple of pieces of double sided tape and have them tape their Indominus rex

    onto the paper with the shapes.

    ✔ Tape all the students’ work on the wall and have students line up at the other end of the room.

    ✔ Have students try to find the Indominus rex in each picture. Have them all take one big step closer

    and look again. Have students keep walking forward until they can all find every Indominus rex.

    ✔ If time allows, have students complete the assignment again to see if they can figure out how to

    make their Indominus rex more camouflaged.

    Debrief • Ask students to identify which Indominus rex was easiest to find and why.

    • Ask students what advantage it would be for predators to be camouflaged.

    • Ask students to discuss what predators they know and explain how they are,

    or are not, camouflaged.

    Grade Level Adaptations

    More Advanced

    Instead of drawing random shapes as the background, have students

    draw different natural scenes (forests, mountains, etc.) When students

    look for the dinosaurs, discuss the role of the setting in camouflage.

    Less Advanced

    Make one master background and give to students before they make

    their own Indominus rex. Have students color the Indominus rex so

    that it is best camouflaged.

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    The Hidden Dinosaur | WORKSHEETHave each student cut out the Indominus rex below.

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  • AREA 800 | INNOVATION CENTER

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSHow can fossils be used to help scientists learn about the behaviors of extinct animals?

    What innovations would you like to see in your lifetime?

    Activity NamePREVENTING EXTINCTION!

    OverviewDinosaurs once ruled the earth, but are now extinct. Why? What adaptations did they need to survive? In this

    activity, students create a modern dinosaur that has all the evolutionary features that they think a dinosaur

    would have needed to survive the last great extinction. When students finish this activity, tell them that all

    dinosaurs did not go extinct. In fact, many survived and are now modern day birds.

    Cross Cutting ConceptStability and change

    Materials ListPaper

    Procedure✔ Ask students why there are no longer dinosaurs on earth. Ask students to discuss how they

    think they went extinct.

    ✔ Most likely students will have heard that dinosaurs went extinct because of the impact of a meteor. Discuss

    why a meteor hitting the earth would cause 60-70% of all life on earth to go extinct. There are several

    theories, but generally most scientists believe that the dust thrown up by impact of the meteor blocked

    out the sun; causing plants to die and changing the global temperature for months or possibly years.

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    Procedure | (Continued from page 29)

    ✔ Ask students if all life died after the meteor hit and have them explain why or why not.

    Ask students what types of animals survived the extinction.

    ✔ Ask students to discuss why the animals listed below survived. Write the animals listed below

    on the board and have student add comments, questions, and new ideas.

    ✎ Crocodiles–lived in water and were able to avoid the extreme heat and cold caused by impact

    ✎ Horseshoe Crabs–able to eat basically ANYTHING, so even when the plants died they could find food.

    ✎ Cockroaches–they also eat just about anything and can also reproduce quickly.

    ✎ Small Mammals (like mice and rats)–able to burrow to get out of extreme weather and can

    hunt for insects and other bugs for food.

    ✔ Tell students that they are now going to reengineer dinosaurs, so that they could survive the meteor

    impact. They are going to draw a new kind of dinosaur on a blank sheet of paper, a kind of dinosaur that

    would have been able to survive the impact.

    ✔ Give the students time to draw this new dinosaur and make sure they label the adaptations using at least

    2 from the list you created on the board.

    ✔ Have students share their drawing with the class.

    Debrief • Ask students about the similarities and differences of their drawings. As a class, discuss some

    of the features that are most common and discuss some of the more unique ideas as well.

    • Tell students that not all dinosaurs went extinct! In fact, many of today’s birds are direct

    descendants (mostly predatory birds) of dinosaurs. Ask students if any of their drawings

    look like a bird and discuss why or why not.

    Grade Level Adaptations

    More Advanced

    Have students research what kinds of animals survived the

    extinction and have them make their own list of features,

    instead of providing one for them.

    Less Advanced

    Make the list of features much more specific, so the students

    know exactly what adaptations to add to their drawings.

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  • AREA 900 | SCIENTIFIC EPILOGUE

    ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSWhat did you learn about dinosaurs after going through the Exhibition?

    What questions do you have?

    If we could, do you think we should clone dinosaurs? Why or why not?

    What other innovations would you like scientists to work on? Why?

    Activity NameJURASSIC WORLD PRE AND POST REFLECTION

    OverviewThis is an activity to start before visiting and to complete after visiting JURASSIC WORLD: THE EXHIBITION.

    It is important to give students time to think about the issues being presented, before going into the Exhibition,

    as well as time to reflect and discuss what they saw. This activity provides students with a structured way to

    reflect to help them internalize their learning.

    Cross Cutting ConceptStability and Change

    Materials ListPre and Post Visit Worksheet

    Procedure✔ Before taking your class to see JURASSIC WORLD: THE EXHIBITION, have them complete the

    first column in the Jurassic World Pre and Post Reflection worksheet.

    ✔ After your field trip, have the students complete the reflection worksheet.

    ✔ Put students in pairs or groups of 3 and have them discuss their answers.

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    (Continued from page 31)

    Debrief: • Ask students to share which of their ideas changed from before they saw the Exhibition to after.

    • Have students discuss the idea of reality and fantasy.

    Is Jurassic World a fantasy, or is it something that could actually happen?

    Grade Level Adaptations:

    More Advanced

    Ask students to come up with their own worksheet before entering the Exhibition.

    It can be a KWL chart with the first column reading ‘What I Know”, the second column reading ‘What I Want to

    Know’ (These 2 columns are completed before visiting the Exhibition), and the third column is ‘What I Learned’

    (complete after the field trip.)

    Less Advanced

    Answer all the questions as a class.

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    Jurassic World Pre and Post Reflection | WORKSHEET

    What are the pros and cons of cloning?

    What are the ways that dinosaurs attack?

    What was the environment like during the time of dinosaurs? How was it different than our current climate?

    How are genes passed from parent to offspring?

    What can you tell about an animal based on its feces?

    What’s the role of camouflage?

    Why is having blood from dinosaurs so important for scientists?

    What are fossils used for?

    What innovations would you like to see in your lifetime?

    QUESTIONSANSWER BEFORE VISITING

    JURASSIC WORLD: THE EXHIBITION

    ANSWER AFTER VISITING JURASSIC WORLD:

    THE EXHIBITION

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