Lean Six Sigma Manual

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<p>Lean Six Sigma </p> <p>for Colleges A team based approach for process </p> <p>improvement in Colleges </p> <p> P a g e 1 Scott-Jardine 2012 </p> <p> P a g e 2 Scott-Jardine 2012 </p> <p>Table of Contents </p> <p>Background ............................................................................................................................. 5 </p> <p>Introduction to Deploying Lean Six Sigma Projects In Colleges </p> <p>Using this Manual ................................................................................................................... 8 </p> <p>What are LSS Projects? ........................................................................................................... 9 </p> <p>What are the different types of Project? ............................................................................. 10 </p> <p>The DMAIC process structure .............................................................................................. 12 </p> <p>Commonly asked questions about LSS ................................................................................. 14 </p> <p>Management of Lean Six Sigma Projects within Colleges </p> <p>Process Management Structure ........................................................................................... 16 </p> <p>Communication and Timing of Projects ............................................................................... 17 </p> <p>Role of the Principal and VPs .............................................................................................. 18 </p> <p>Role of the College Champion .............................................................................................. 19 </p> <p>Role of the Project Manager ................................................................................................ 20 </p> <p>Project steering committee.................................................................................................. 20 </p> <p>Selection of College Champions and Project Managers ...................................................... 22 </p> <p>Project Team Selection and Make Up .................................................................................. 24 </p> <p>Project Selection and Strategic Alignment ........................................................................... 25 </p> <p>Project Sequence and Timelines .......................................................................................... 27 </p> <p>Project Charters </p> <p>Using Project Charters .......................................................................................................... 30 </p> <p>How to Prepare LSS Projects </p> <p>Introduction.......................................................................................................................... 37 </p> <p>Potential Pitfalls ................................................................................................................... 37 </p> <p>Facilities and Project Logistics .............................................................................................. 40 </p> <p>Collection of initial supporting data ..................................................................................... 42 </p> <p>Initial Training </p> <p>Purpose................................................................................................................................. 44 </p> <p>Content ................................................................................................................................. 45 </p> <p> P a g e 3 Scott-Jardine 2012 </p> <p>Delivery ................................................................................................................................. 46 </p> <p>Running Project Meetings </p> <p>Using the DMAIC Process to Structure Meetings ................................................................ 49 </p> <p>Generating and Testing Ideas............................................................................................... 52 </p> <p>Safety Issues ......................................................................................................................... 53 </p> <p>Team Rules ........................................................................................................................... 54 </p> <p>Recording Activities and Actions .......................................................................................... 55 </p> <p>Keeping the Team on Track .................................................................................................. 56 </p> <p>Example Meeting Agenda .................................................................................................... 57 </p> <p>Process Mapping </p> <p>Introduction to Process Mapping......................................................................................... 59 </p> <p>Purpose................................................................................................................................. 60 </p> <p>Using Current and Future State Maps.................................................................................. 61 </p> <p>Manual Process Mapping as a Tool ...................................................................................... 63 </p> <p>Basic Flowcharting Symbols ................................................................................................. 64 </p> <p>Using Bizagi Software ........................................................................................................... 66 </p> <p>Examples of Process Maps ................................................................................................... 68 </p> <p>The Final Presentation </p> <p>Purpose................................................................................................................................. 71 </p> <p>Structure ............................................................................................................................... 72 </p> <p>Who Should Attend? ............................................................................................................ 73 </p> <p>Celebrating Success .............................................................................................................. 74 </p> <p>Sustainment and Project Follow Up </p> <p>Measuring Success ............................................................................................................... 76 </p> <p>Using RAG Reporting ............................................................................................................ 77 </p> <p>Example RAG Report ............................................................................................................ 78 </p> <p>Project Close-Out ................................................................................................................. 79 </p> <p>Roles and Responsibilities .................................................................................................... 80 </p> <p>Follow up Communications .................................................................................................. 81 </p> <p>Glossary of Terms </p> <p>Glossary of terms ................................................................................................................. 83 </p> <p> P a g e 4 Scott-Jardine 2012 </p> <p> 2012 Scott-Jardine </p> <p>Limit of use </p> <p>The use of this publication is limited to Bromley, Bexley and John Ruskin College. Permission is granted to </p> <p>these bodies to use, reproduce and transmit this manual for use within the confines of the named colleges. </p> <p>However, outside of the named colleges, no part of this manual may be reproduced or transmitted in any form </p> <p>or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage </p> <p>and retrieval system without permission in writing from the authors. </p> <p> The AoC, as the overseeing body of the project, is also granted permission to use this manual within the same </p> <p>limits of permission </p> <p>Limit of Liability </p> <p>Individuals using and/ or reading this manual are responsible for their use of the information contained. The </p> <p>authors make no guarantees with regard as to the accuracy or completeness of the book and specifically </p> <p>disclaim all warranties of fitness for a particular purpose. </p> <p> The manual does not constitute professional or legal advice and the reader is advised to seek competent </p> <p>advice in any particular matter in relation to any matters regarding the readers business or personal affairs. </p> <p>No responsibilities or liabilities are assumed by the Authors whatsoever </p> <p> P a g e 5 Scott-Jardine 2012 </p> <p>Background Colleges are faced with an increasingly difficult task: improving the outcomes for students </p> <p>despite reduced budgets and against a backdrop of continued economic uncertainty. </p> <p>Achieving maximum value for money from existing resources while improving quality and </p> <p>performance is critical to success. </p> <p>As with other parts of the economy Colleges can harness the benefits of Lean and Six Sigma </p> <p>to streamline their internal processes. </p> <p>Lean and Six Sigma have been found to be very successful approaches to improving quality </p> <p>and increasing efficiency in a wide range of processes. They use the skills and experience of </p> <p>staff in the organisation and use a structured team based approach to deliver the benefits. </p> <p>Through the AoC shared services initiative a Lean and Six Sigma programme was undertaken </p> <p>with Warwickshire and Coventry Colleges in 2011. Significant benefits were seen from this </p> <p>programme across the processes studied which covered pre-enrolment, enrolment, </p> <p>examinations, and registration. </p> <p>Following on from the success of this programme, a further programme funded by the FE </p> <p>Innovation Fund agreed with the AoC was implemented called Embedding process </p> <p>efficiency gains using Lean and Six Sigma. This programme was deployed in Bromley College </p> <p>(including Orpington Campus), Bexley College and John Ruskin College. </p> <p>The programme commenced with an initial trainings session for the staff across all the </p> <p>Colleges. The training focused on the basic tools and techniques of Lean and Six Sigma also </p> <p>the removal of waste and improvement in the reliability of College processes. This was </p> <p>followed up by the practical application of the tools and techniques within four projects that </p> <p>were identified by the Steering Committee. </p> <p>Cross College teams were formed and the structured DMAIC process was used to progress </p> <p>the projects and identify improvements in the relevant processes. The processes studied in </p> <p>this programme were enrolment, fee collection, payroll and student services. </p> <p>At the end of the projects, final presentations were made to College leadership and staff. </p> <p>Also the key actions that would be undertaken to secure the improvements were identified. </p> <p>As part of the overall programme it was agreed a toolkit would be developed to help College </p> <p>Managers and Leaders to undertake their own improvement projects. </p> <p>This manual is the result of that work and is designed to help you to introduce </p> <p>improvements into your College through team based improvement following the DMAIC </p> <p>roadmap that is defined later in this manual. </p> <p> P a g e 6 Scott-Jardine 2012 </p> <p>Introduction to Deploying </p> <p>Lean Six Sigma Projects </p> <p>In Colleges </p> <p> P a g e 7 Scott-Jardine 2012 </p> <p>Introduction to Lean Six Sigma You have embarked, or are about to embark, on an exciting journey within your College. </p> <p>Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a team based process improvement tool that, when deployed </p> <p>correctly, will not only generate savings and improve customer quality, but will also </p> <p>generate excitement with those people and departments who are involved. </p> <p>The fundamental concept you should always keep in mind is that Lean Six Sigma is a process </p> <p>of continuous improvement. Its a journey and not something that is undertaken once. </p> <p>As on any journey, along the way you will see ups and downs. You will be met with a whole </p> <p>series of challenges, but again by its very nature Lean Six Sigma is exciting and most of all, </p> <p>fun. </p> <p>Waste exists in its various forms in every part of day to day working. Lean Six Sigma is a </p> <p>framework that provides structure to the process of identifying and eliminating that waste </p> <p>and puts in place measures to continually strive to look for mare opportunities to improve. </p> <p>We dont know what we dont know. </p> <p>We cant act on what we dont know. </p> <p>We wont know until we search. </p> <p>We wont search for what we dont question. </p> <p>We dont question what we dont measure. </p> <p>Hence, we just dont know. </p> <p>Dr. Mikel Harry </p> <p> P a g e 8 Scott-Jardine 2012 </p> <p>Using this Manual Although many of the tools and techniques are similar to those used in other sectors, the deployment process within the College environment is different. This manual draws upon the leanings from the Lean Six Sigma project run with Bromley, Bexley and John Ruskin Colleges(2012) and a similar project run with Warwickshire, Coventry Henley and Stratford Colleges (2011). </p> <p>This manual is aimed at those who are involved with the implementation of Lean Six Sigma </p> <p>(LSS) within the College environment. Its aim is to act as a guide to assist in the smooth </p> <p>running of the complete process and explains the set-up, planning, execution and follow up </p> <p>phases of a Lean Six Sigma project. </p> <p>This manual is not meant to be a complete guide to the ins and outs of Lean Six Sigma. This </p> <p>is not something that can be learnt from a book or a manual, because every project is </p> <p>different. Each process on each campus will have its own nuances meaning the route to </p> <p>improvement will be different each time. </p> <p>Knowing which tools to use and at what time comes with experience. Put simply the more </p> <p>improvement activity you do the more you will start to see and, by default, the better the </p> <p>results. </p> <p>It is strongly advised, before you start using this manual to deploy the Lean Six Sigma </p> <p>process, that you have been involved in and experienced at least one Lean Six Sigma project </p> <p>to help you understand the DMAIC process and also the cultural change processes that take </p> <p>place within the project group and your wider College audience. </p> <p>This manual can also serve as a guide to Principals and those involved in the steering group </p> <p>and governance process of Lean Six Sigma deployment. Its seeks to help them better </p> <p>understand their roles in improving their Colleges processes though the effective </p> <p>deployment of the Lean Six Sigma methodology at a senior level. </p> <p>Most importantly, the manual also identifies some of the lessons learnt and some of the </p> <p>pitfalls to be aware of as you move through the process. </p> <p> P a g e 9 Scott-Jardine 2012 </p> <p>What are Lean Six Sigma Projects? </p> <p>Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a structured approach that helps manage and improve the quality, performance and cost of a process. </p> <p>Lean Six Sigma Projects are essentially planned interven...</p>