Lesson One -NTA 811

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<ul><li><p>8/3/2019 Lesson One -NTA 811</p><p> 1/5</p><p>Lesson One:</p><p>1. Significance of Research Report writing</p><p> As a major component of the research study</p><p> Becomes complete if written and presented</p><p> No matter how brilliant the hypotheses are, or well designed and conducted,</p><p>or most striking the generelisations and findings are; unless it is</p><p>communicated to others, it is valueless.</p><p> Unless findings are made known to others, the purpose of research is not well</p><p>served.</p><p> As integral part of the research project, it cannot be omitted.</p><p> Presentation of results or writing a report is, therefore, part and parcel of the</p><p>research project.</p><p>2. Research beginning point</p><p>a. A research report is a tool by which you will communicate your</p><p>investigations with others. Before beginning to work on the report, you must first</p><p>complete most of your research. When the research is complete, and all the</p><p>necessary data and interpretation is over it, you can do the following:</p><p> Thinking about the content of your research report. Start this exercise by</p><p>searching the literature in your area of research.</p><p> Review the literature to see what has been published on your topic in the</p><p>past and identify the various sources to use in writing your own report.</p><p> Note, conduct a literature search by browsing through journals and other</p><p>references that are important in your field or by conducting a key word search</p><p>through library databases.</p><p>Conduct the prewriting exercise by answering the following questions asa basis of your report (consult Blake, Gary and Bly et.al)</p><p> Describe the purpose of your research. Are you presenting the results of</p><p>research, outlining a new theory or method, and/or offering a new</p><p>interpretation of old data?</p><p> Describe the most important feature of your research.</p></li><li><p>8/3/2019 Lesson One -NTA 811</p><p> 2/5</p><p> Make a list of anyone who contributed to your research and who could be</p><p>involved in writing the research report. Describe the contribution they might</p><p>make to your research report.</p><p> Compile a list of works by other researchers that you used in your own</p><p>research or that is related to your research.</p><p> Describe the ways in which your research proves or disproves other</p><p>researchers' work.</p><p> Describe the background of this subject.</p><p> Describe what you expected to find before you began your research. How</p><p>did your project change over time? How did your results differ from your</p><p>expectations?</p><p> Describe your results. How did you check your results? How can you</p><p>best represent them: with text, in a table, with a figure, etc?</p><p> Describe the consequences of your research. What does it mean for the</p><p>subject? How will it affect future research on this subject?</p><p> Describe the ideal audience for your report. Who would be most</p><p>impacted by your research? Who would best understand the consequences of</p><p>your research?</p><p> If you are seeking to publish your report, describe the journals in which</p><p>you would like to see your research appear. What are the specific</p><p>requirements for these journals? Additionally, what type of language should</p><p>you use in writing your report? Look carefully at journals to which you are</p><p>interested in submitting; how do writers describe their experimental data?</p><p> Consider the specific guidelines under which you are working. If</p><p>relevant, make a list of the sections you are required to include in your report.</p><p>If you have freedom in choosing sections to include, make a list of the</p><p>sections you think will be necessary to include.</p><p>3. Research Audiences and their expectations</p></li><li><p>8/3/2019 Lesson One -NTA 811</p><p> 3/5</p><p>a. Itis important to consider to whom you are communicating your research</p><p>before you begin and while you write your research report. The reader and not</p><p>the writer is the one who dictates the appropriate form of the research report.</p><p>They will dictate whether a technical (in case of technocrats) or a popular</p><p>report (to non technical audience or public, or both is needed. In this way your</p><p>report will adequately communicate your research and its significance to your</p><p>readers.</p><p>b. Incase of academic research, you should write as though your lecturer,</p><p>research supervisor or professor is not your reader. You should think of a</p><p>much broader audience including your peers and colleagues who will not be</p><p>involved in evaluating and or grading your research work. To make it much</p><p>easier, it is advisable to think of an audience of people with a similar</p><p>background who are interested in your subject, but who do not know as much</p><p>about your investigations as well as those who are uninterested bearing in</p><p>mind that, someone skilled in the art could reproduce your work precisely.</p><p>c. People may have no time. They will want information to be presented</p><p>clearly and concisely as possible, thorough and accurate. While readers from</p><p>your own discipline and area of research might read your report closely and</p><p>all the way through, many other readers will read only the title and abstract to</p><p>keep abreast of research.</p><p>d. To understand precisely your audience, conduct a pre writing exercise by</p><p>answering the following questions:</p><p> Describe your audience. What is their position? Why will they read</p><p>your report?</p><p> What does your audience already know about this topic?</p><p> What information will be new to your reader?</p><p> What is the most important thing for your reader to understand from</p><p>your report?</p><p> List terms and/or procedures that is important to your research but that</p><p>your audience may not be familiar with. Include terms that you are using</p><p>in a new or unique way.</p></li><li><p>8/3/2019 Lesson One -NTA 811</p><p> 4/5</p><p> It is important to consider to whom you are communicating your</p><p>research before you begin and while you write your research report. The</p><p>reader and not the writer is the one who dictates the appropriate form of</p><p>the research report. They will dictate whether a technical (in case of</p><p>technocrats) or a popular report (to non technical audience or public, or</p><p>both is needed. In this way your report will adequately communicate your</p><p>research and its significance to your readers.</p><p> Incase of academic research, you should write as though your lecturer,</p><p>research supervisor or professor is not your reader. You should think of a</p><p>much broader audience including your peers and colleagues who will not</p><p>be involved in evaluating and or grading your research work. To make it</p><p>much easier, it is advisable to think of an audience of people with a similar</p><p>background who are interested in your subject, but who do not know as</p><p>much about your investigations as well as those who are uninterested</p><p>bearing in mind that, someone skilled in the art could reproduce your work</p><p>precisely.</p><p> People may have no time. They will want information to be presented</p><p>clearly and concisely as possible, thorough and accurate. While readers</p><p>from your own discipline and area of research might read your reportclosely and all the way through, many other readers will read only the title</p><p>and abstract to keep abreast of research.</p><p> To understand precisely your audience, conduct a pre writing exercise</p><p>by answering the following questions:</p><p>o Describe your audience. What is their position? Why will they</p><p>read your report?</p><p>o What does your audience already know about this topic?</p><p>o What information will be new to your reader?</p><p>o What is the most important thing for your reader to understand</p><p>from your report?</p></li><li><p>8/3/2019 Lesson One -NTA 811</p><p> 5/5</p><p>o List terms and/or procedures that is important to your research</p><p>but that your audience may not be familiar with. Include terms</p><p>that you are using in a new or unique way.</p></li></ul>

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