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    AIIII

    LIVING WITH THE METHOW RIVER

  • J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 4

    Landowners are cr i t ical to the on-going efforts to protect and restore the health of the Methow watershed. The Methow Restorat ion Counci l i s working with local landowners to develop restorat ion and stewardship plans to im-prove r ipar ian habitat, reduce invasive weeds, and improve stream health.

    Building A Conservation Ethic

    BLOCK PRINT BY L ILY WHITE, 5TH GRADE STUDENT, IN A METHOW ARTS’ EDUCATION PROGRAM.

    P h o t o b y T e r i P i e p e r .

  • 29

    NEW YEAR’S DAY

    MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY

    Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    21 3 4

    5 6 7 8 9 10 11

    12 13 14 15 16 17 18

    2019 21 22 23 24 25

    26 27 28 30 31

    Methow Conservancy509.996.2870

    FOLLOW THE FISH! Go onl ine and f ind activ i t ies, adventures and information for

    each month. LEARN ABOUT CONSERVATION this month.

    www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

  • F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4

    The Methow Beaver Project

    By the mid-1800s, unrestr icted trapping effect ively el iminated beavers f rom the Methow watershed. As a result , our val ley lost v i tal beaver-created wetland habitat. The Methow Beaver Project is re- introducing beavers to key streams in the Methow to re-establ ish wetlands and r ipar ian forests and to increase water storage. This highly successful program has become a model for beaver re- introduction and watershed improvement throughout the Pacif ic Northwest.

    BEAVER BLOCK PRINT BY WILLOW TEMPLE, 5TH GRADE, METHOW VALLEY

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    2

    1

    3 4 5 6 7 8

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15

    16 17 18 2019 21 22

    23 24 25 26 27 28PRESIDENTS’ DAY

    The Methow Beaver Project is a partnership between MSRF, DOE, WDFW, USFS, USFWS, and the Methow Conservancy. Kent Woodruff , 509.996.4000.

    This February learn about BEAVERS @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

  • Salmon , steelhead, and trout dig nests cal led redds in gravel r iverbeds, often when the stream f low transit ions f rom a pool into a r i f f le or where a log or boulder has created a deposit of gravel.

    WHEN YOU ENTER A STREAM, WADE CAREFULLY

    AND TAKE THE FOLLOWING PRECAUTIONS :

    - Avoid wading where gravel (pea to golf bal l -s ized) looks br ight and clean. These are clues that f i sh have recently spawned there.

    - Avoid cross ing where water f lows out of a pool.

    - Do not disturb, or attempt to catch, act ively spawning f ish.

    AR

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    R e s i d e n t b u l l t r o u t .R e sR e sR e sR eR e i d edi d ed ei d e n tn tn t b u lb u lb u lbb l tl tll tl r o ur o uu ttttt

    M A R C H 2 0 1 4

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    2

    1

    3 4 5 6 7 8

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15

    16 17 18 2019 21 22

    23 24 25 26 27 28 29

    30 31

    FIRST DAY OF SPRING

    Steelhead begin to spawnin lower Methow River

    Chinook and bull troutfry emerge1

    DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME BEGINS

    Gene Shul l , Forest Service Fisheries Biologist509.996.4000

    This March learn about SPAWNING FISH @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

  • Fish Love Flo ods

    A reconnected channel of Twi sp R iver at E lbow Coulee.

    Catching stray leaves and smal l branches

    Racing the wind

    Captur ing stones in i ts currents

    Dropping through the big val ley

    Carry ing l i fe

    Poetry excerpt f rom “Windows into the Wi ld/River of Words”, a Clay T i le mural on the Methow River, created through the Methow Arts Program by 5th and 6th grade students. Teaching art ists : L inda Robertson, J im Neupert and Bruce Morr ison.

    RIVER

    When r ivers and streams r ise dur ing f loods, the water temporar i ly overf lows onto surrounding lands. These low-ly ing f loodplain and s ide channel areas are an important part of a functioning watershed. As f lows r i se, f i sh fol low the waters into off-channel habitats, where s lower water provides refuge from the deep, fast currents in the main channel.

    Improving connections between r ivers and creeks and their surrounding f loodplains helps create the complex habitat needed to support salmon restorat ion in the Methow watershed.

    A P R I L 2 0 1 4

    A reconnected channel of Twisp R iver at E lbow Coulee

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    21 3 4 5

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    21 22 23 24 25 26

    27 28 29 30EARTH DAY ARBOR DAY

    Steelhead begin to spawnin upper Methow River

    Chris Johnson, Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation, President, 509.996.2787

    This month, learn about FLOODS @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

  • M A Y 2 0 1 4A R T W O R K B Y Z A C H A R Y N E S S .5 T H G R A D E S T U D E N T , M E T H O W V A L L E Y .

    SPRING CHINO OK

    Juveni le Spr ing Chinook.

    Between May and July, spr ing Chinook return to their bi r thplace to spawn in a pro-cess cal led “homing.” As juveni les, these f ish t raveled 600 mi les down the Columbia, over nine dams, and out into the Pacif ic Ocean. As adults , they reverse this journey to return home to the Methow.

    Histor ical ly, more than 24,000 spr ing Chinook salmon returned to the Methow every summer. Now, fewer than 500 wi ld f i sh return each year to spawn. In 1999, these f ish were l i s ted as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. S ince then, partners across the region have been working to recover wi ld f i sh populat ion through improvements in habitat, hatchery practices, passage through dams, and harvest management.

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    21 3

    4 5 6 7 8 9 10

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17

    18 2019 21 22 23 24

    25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    MEMORIAL DAYSteelhead smolts migrate

    out to sea

    Greer Maier, Upper Colombia Salmon Recovery Board Science Liaison, 509.888.7219

    This month, learn about SPRING CHINOOK @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

  • J U N E 2 0 1 4

    Temperature is an important indicator of water qual i ty. Methow River f i sh depend on cold water (45-60 °F) to thr ive, and they are sensit ive to any change to the waters where they l ive.

    Temperature plays an important role in regulat ing f ish growth, migratory behavior, reproduc-t ion and, ult imately, survival . Preserving and restor ing the r ipar ian forests that shade the r iver i s an important way to help keep our f i sh “cool”.

    Healthy Rivers,

    Healthy Communities

    Chewuch R iver , r ight photo by Methow Conservancy; le f t photo by Deb Nicke l l .

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    21 3 4 5 6 7

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    15 16 17 18 2019 21

    22 23 24 25 26 27 28Bull trout migrate to

    spawning areas

    Adult Chinook return tothe Methow River

    29 30

    SUMMER BEGINS

    FISHING DAY AT WINTHROP FISH

    HATCHERY

    John Crandall , Methow Water Quali ty Monitor ing Partnership, 509.341.4341

    “Follow ME !”

    This month, learn about HEALTHY RIVERS & COMMUNITIES @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

  • J U L Y 2 0 1 4

    W I N N I N G A R T W O R K F O R T H E 2 0 1 3 F I S H I N G D A Y T - S H I R T B Y A L I P A L M , 5 T H G R A D E .

    B E F O R E

    A F T E R

    P h o t o s s h o w r e s t o r a t i o n a t T w i s p P o n d s D i s c o v e r y C e n t e r . W a t e r s h e d W a t c h e r s b r i n g s s t u d e n t s t o l e a r n a b o u t t h e v a l u e o f n a t i v e v e g e t a t i o n a n d p l a n t n a t i v e t r e e s a n d p l a n t s . P h o t o s , C h r i s J o h n s o n .

    The summer sun can be relent less, and r is ing water temperatures can put a strain on the aquatic environment. Trees and shrubs along the r iverbank cast shadows across the water, reducing the warming effects of the summer sun and creating shady refuge for f i sh and wi ldl i fe.

    Healthy r ipar ian areas are comprised of a diverse mix of nat ive vegetat ion of dif ferent heights and matur i ty. Help keep r ipar ian areas healthy by preserving exist ing streamside vegetat ion and restor ing cleared areas with nat ive species.

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

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    INDEPENDENCE DAY

    METHOW ARTS FESTIVALSteelhead fry emerge

    Jason Lundgren, Columbia Cascade Fisheries Enhancement Group, 509.888.7268

    “Follow ME !”

    This month, learn about SUMMER @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

  • I r r igat ion Eff ic iencies are farm improvements that include piping and system upgrades, l ike switch-

    ing from f lood i r r igat ion to pivots. These eff ic iencies save water by reducing the amount of water

    lost through transportat ion and evaporat ion before reaching the f ields. This saved water increases

    st ream f lows and decreases temperature, which is important to f i sh growth, migrat ion, reproduction,

    and survival . The upgrades also benefit the landowner by reducing the labor previously required to

    maintain ineff icient systems.

    Water Conservation

    A U G U S T 2 0 1 4

    A R T W O R K B Y S H E L B Y W H I T E , 5 T H G R A D E , M E T H O W V A L L E Y

    Beaver Creek Ranch. Photo by Ter i P ieper .

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

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    3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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    17 18 2019 21 22 23

    24 25 26 27 28 29 3031

    Spring Chinook begin to spawn

    Lisa Pel ly, Trout Unl imited’s Western Water Project, 509.888.0970

    This month, learn about WATER CONSERVATION @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

  • The nights are cool ing, and the days are shortening. Trees and plants in the r ipar ian habitats adjacent to st reams are sett l ing in for winter. F ish and wi ldl i fe depend on the cycle of growth, seed production, leaf drop, decay, and regrowth that sustains r iver ine systems.

    Help preserve r ipar ian forests by leaving dead trees and blow-down in place, and encourage the growth of a diverse mix of nat ive trees, shrubs, and grasses.

    Lef t photo, Twi sp Ponds , by Chr i s Johnson; R ight photo, Upper Methow R iver , by the

    Methow Conservancy.

    Lef t photo Twisp Ponds by Chr i s Johnson;

    S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 4

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    21 3 4 5 6

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    14 15 16 17 18 2019

    21 22 23 24 25 26 27

    28 29 30

    Bull trout begin to spawnLABOR DAY

    Adult steelhead return from ocean

    Spring Chinook spawning ends and Summer Chinook

    spawning begins

    Lynda Hofmann, Wildl i fe Department of F ish and Wildl i fe Area Habitat Biologist ,509.997.9428 “Follow ME !”

    This month, learn about RIPARIAN FOREST @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

  • AR

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    Research shows that wi ld steelhead born in the gravels of natural st reams and r ivers are better suited to survive the journey to and from the ocean than those that are raised and released from hatcher ies. When hatchery steelhead spawn with wi ld steelhead, their off-spr ing are less l ikely to survive to adult-hood and spawn than those with two wi ld parents. This reduces and weakens the populat ion of wi ld steelhead.

    By harvest ing adult hatchery steelhead, anglers help prevent hatchery f i sh f rom spawning with wi ld f i sh. The steelhead f ishery in the Methow River requires that anglers keep adipose f in-cl ipped steel-head. To reduce injury to the wi ld f i sh, al l steelhead with adipose f ins must be kept in the water pr ior to release.

    steelhead

    O C T O B E R 2 0 1 4

    All s tee lhead wi th an intact adipose f in , as shown here, must remain in the water whi le be ing re leased.

  • 29

    COLUMBUS DAY

    Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    21 3 4

    5 6 7 8 9 10 11

    12 13 14 15 16 17 18

    2019 21 22 23 24 25

    26 27 28 30 31

    Bull trout spawning ends

    Washington Department of F ish and Wildl i fe F ish Biologist , 509.997.0316

    This month, learn about STEELHEAD FISH @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

  • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 4

    A R T W O R K B Y J O N A T H A N I N G - M O O D Y , 5 T H G R A D E S T U D E N T , M E T H O W V A L L E Y .

    Logs offer many benefits to salmon. This photo shows recently placed large woody debris on the Methow River near Witte Road. F ind updated information and photos onl ine at: www.methowsalmon.org Photo by Torre Stockard.

    Over the last century, the Methow River

    Watershed has exper ienced s ignif icant

    changes to r iver habitat, and these

    changes have contr ibuted to decl ines in

    steelhead and salmon populat ions. The

    Methow Restorat ion Counci l works to

    coordinate var ious efforts to improve

    habitat condit ions for f i sh. These efforts

    include removing barr iers to migrat ion,

    increasing avai lable f loodplain and s ide

    channel habitat, improving r ipar ian areas,

    increasing instream habitat, and improving

    in-stream f lows.

    These actions are designed to ass ist salmon

    recovery by improving f ish growth and

    survival . Although they are designed to

    improve condit ions for f i sh, these projects

    also benefit wi ldl i fe by improving habitat in

    and near r ivers. The whole community

    benefits f rom projects that improve water

    qual i ty in our local st reams and r ivers.

    fish grow on trees

  • THANKSGIVING DAY

    Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    2

    1

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    9 10 11 12 13 14 15

    16 17 18 2019 21 22

    23 24 25 26 27 28 29

    30

    VETERANS DAY

    DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME ENDS

    Summer Chinook spawning ends

    Jennifer Molesworth, USBR Methow Subbasin L iaison, 509.997.0640

    This month, learn about NEW PROJECTS @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

  • AR

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    E ST

    UD

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    LOG

    AN

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    LL.

    Adu l t female coho sa lmon. Photo by Kra ig Mott .h tt bbbbbbbbb KKKKKKKKK i M ttt tt tt tt tt tt tt tt tAd l t ff lll h ll PP

    FISH MONI TORING

    D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 4

    To track their movements and survival , some

    f ish in the Methow are implanted with smal l

    coded tags. These tags can be read ( l ike

    a bar code at the supermarket checkout)

    at a number of antennas instal led in the

    Methow Watershed and throughout

    the Columbia basin.

    When a f ish swims over the antenna,

    the t ime, date, and f ish tag number are

    recorded. This al lows scient ists to t rack i f

    a f i sh is al ive, when f ish are us ing certain

    habitats, how long i t takes to t ravel f rom

    one place to another, and when juveni les

    are migrat ing out to the ocean.

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    21 3 4 5 6

    7 8 9 10 11 12 13

    14 15 16 17 18 2019

    21 22 23 24 25 26 27

    28 29 30CHRISTMAS DAY

    31FIRST DAY OF

    WINTER

    This month, learn about FISH MONITORING @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

    Grace Watson, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Monitor ing Project Lead, 509.997.0640

  • The data are clear. The global cl imate is changing far more rapidly now than i t has in the last several mi l l ion years.

    The Methow Watershed is now in t ransit ion f rom a snow-dominated cl imate to one dominated by rain.

    Seasonal low f lows wi l l be lower, occur more frequently, and last longer. Peak f lood f lows wi l l vary more than in the past, and peaks wi l l take place ear l ier in the year.

    Twisp Ponds . Photo by Deb Nicke l l .

    J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 5

    CHANGING CLIMATE

    ARTWORK BY KRISTY VIETH, 5TH GRADE, METHOW VALLEY.

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    21 3

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    11 12 13 14 15 16 17

    18 2019 21 22 23 24

    25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    NEW YEAR’S DAY

    MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY

    Lee Hatcher, Methow Watershed Council Coordinator, 509.341.4260

    This month, learn about OUR CHANGING CLIMATE @www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

    “Follow ME !”

  • The Methow Restorat ion Counci l (MRC) is the lead coordinat ing group for f i sh populat ion and habitat restorat ion in the Methow Watershed. The MRC serves as a forum for federal , t r ibal , state, county, local, and non-prof i t ent i t ies committed to working togeather to improve watershed health. MRC holds monthly meetings on the thi rd Tuesday of each month. These meetings are open to the publ ic, and the MRC encourages publ ic part icpation and involvement.

    Wander the t ra i l s at Twi sp Ponds D i scovery Center and f ind an ar ray of or ig ina l ar twork created by local ar t i s t s . Each p iece honors the ef for t s of the Methow Restorat ion Counci l and local ar t i s t s who work hard to create and sus ta in a heal thy communi ty . The publ ic ar twork creates a natura l gather ing p lace ideal fo r educat ional programs or s imply a re lax ing af ternoon outdoors .

    Work ing together to prov ide combined communi ty out reach and increased support of local ar t i s t s , Methow Sa lmon Recovery Foundat ion and Methow Ar t s A l l iance have p laced four or ig ina l p ieces at the s i te wi th more to come.

    (Photos : Top le f t , Bar ry S t romberger and Dan Brown’s “CAR ART F ISH” sa lvaged f rom r iver cars l ine the path at Twi sp Ponds D i scov-ery Center ; bot tom lef t , B ruce Mor r i son’s “GRANDFATHER FLOOD” carv ing pres ides over the powerfu l changes that permeate and de-f ine our r ipar ian wor ld ; r ight , Cordel ia B rad-burn’s “BLUE HERON AND SMOLT” scu lpture s i t s in a pond and i s v i s ib le f rom Twisp R iver Road. In format ion about each ar t i s t can be found at www.MethowArts .o rg. )

    Pho

    to b

    y Teri Pie

    pe

    r. F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5

    the art of natu re

  • Monday TuesdaySunday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

    21 3 4 5 6 7

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14

    15 16 17 18 2019 21

    22 23 24 25 26 27 28PRESIDENTS’ DAY

    Jessica Goldberg, Methow Restorat ion Council Coordinator,509.997.0028, ext. 263, www.methowrestorat ioncouncil .org “Follow ME !”

    This February, learn about PUBLIC ARTWORK efforts and the ways that the Methow Restorat ion Council connects with our community @ www.methowrestorat ioncounci l .org

  • Spring Chinook, Summer Steelhead, and Bull Trout spawn in the waters of the Methow basin and are protected under the Endangered Species Act.

    Protected Fish

    SPRING CHINOOKChinook salmon live up to eight years: one year in fresh water and two to six years at sea. In August and September, salmon can be seen using their bodies to dig redds. ���������������

    ���������������������spawning areas from other males.

    STEELHEAD TROUTSteelhead can live up to nine years. They spend one to three years in freshwater before ��������������������������������repeat their ocean journey more than once.

    BULL TROUTBull trout can grow to be very large, up to 36 inches, and live up to twelve years. They migrate from larger rivers upstream to small streams to spawn in the fall. They prefer cold, unpolluted water and clean gravel. Large adult bull trout �������������������������

    Spring Chinook, Coho Salmon and Steelhead Trout are anadro-mous. Anadromous fishes are those that are born in freshwater, spend all or part of their adult lives at sea, then return to freshwa-ter streams and rivers to spawn and die. Their carcasses provide nutrients for insects, vegetation, animals and young salmon. These fish migrate down the Columbia to the Pacific and back up to the Methow River Basin–a 1200 mile round trip.

    REDDS

    COHO SALMONCoho salmon are the second largest of the ����������������������������������������of 35 inches, weights of up to 36 pounds.

  • Anadromous Fish that hatch, rear in fresh water, migrate to the ocean to grow and mature, then migrate back to fresh water to breed.

    Channel������������������������������a stream, river, or other waterway.

    ���������������� A voluntary legal agreement that allows a ���������������������������������future uses of a property’s natural resources while retaining private ownership of the land.

    �����������The place where two streams meet.

    �����������������!��������������natural course.

    ��������� Complex system composed of a community of people, animals, and plants as well as the chemical and physical environments.

    ������������������ A species or subspecies whose survival is in danger

    ���"���������������������������������������������

    Erosion A gradual wearing away of soil or rock by running water, waves, or wind.

    Flood plain An area of land adjoining a body of water or natural stream that ����������������������������!

    �-water.

    Flow Amount of water that passes a given point within a given period of ����

    ��� The area or type of environ-ment in which a plant or animal normally lives or occurs.

    ������ The source and upper part of a stream.

    Meander Curves in the stream channel where the stream dissipates energy.

    ������� The maximum volume of water that is carried in the river over a certain period, expressed in cubic feet ����������#���$������%�!�������described in terms of rainfall event frequencies. For example, the “100-��������%�!�&�������'(����������occurring in any given year.

    ������)�������������������������or a river.

    Redd��)�������������

    �������������gravel.

    ����� A stretch of choppy water caused by an underlying rock shoal or sandbar.

    Riparian On or next to the bank of a river, pond, or lake.

    Rip-Rap �)��������������%����������loose stones, broken rock, or boulders placed on the bank of a stream for �������������������

    !��������������������������������*�����������+������������/�suspended in, or deposited by wind or water.

    !�������� The usual boundaries #�������!

    ����������$���������������������;��������������%������named facing downstream.

    "��������������� Any species which ������������������������������in the near future.

    ����������)���������������!������a larger river or stream. The Twisp River is a tributary of the Methow River.

    #������ The area of land that �������������������������������������or river.

    #�$��� Lands including swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas such �������������/���������!��/����!���/������������������

    Glossary

    )����������������������������������������������

    All dates indicated are averages based on data from the WDFW and stream surveys by USFS.

    Spawning JAN - FEB - MAR - APR - MAY - JUN - JUL - AUG - SEPT - OCT - NOV - DEC

    ���������������

    OCT - NOV����� AR - APR - MAY - JUN - JUL - AUG - SEPT - O

    Spr ing Chinook

    Steelhead Trout

    Bul l Trout

    hinook

    d Trout

    ut

    Coho

    USFS.

    CONTACTSBUREAU OF RECLAMATIONJennifer Molesworth, Methow Subbasin Liaison, 509.997.0640, [email protected]

    COLUMBIA CASCADE FISHERIES ENHANCEMENT GROUPMatt Shales, 509.888.7268

    METHOW ARTS ALLIANCEAmanda Jackson Mott, Executive Director, 509.997.4004, [email protected]

    METHOW CONSERVANCY Heidi Anderson, 509.996.2870,[email protected]

    METHOW SALMON RECOVERY FOUNDATION, Chris Johnson, President, 509.996.2787

    METHOW WATERSHED COUNCIL, Lee Hatcher, Coordinator, 509.341.4260

    OKANOGAN CONCERVATION DISTRICTBob Clark, 509.422.0855

    UPPER COLUMBIA SALMON RECOVERY BOARD, Derek Van Marter, Executive Director, 509.670.1462, www.ucsrb.com

    US FOREST SERVICE, METHOW RANGER DISTRICT, Gene Shull, Fisheries Biologist, 509.996.4000, [email protected]

    USGS MONITORING Grace Watson, Project Lead, 509.997.0640

    WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE, Area Habitat Biologist Lynda Hofman, 509.997.9428

    WASHINGTON WATER PROJECT OF TROUT UNLIMITEDJeri Timm, 509.881.7690

    WILD FISH CONSERVANCYJohn Crandall, Biologist. 509.341.4341,[email protected]

    YAKAMA NATION, Rick Alford, Methow Biologist, 509.670.1087,[email protected]-nsn.gov; Hans Smith, Habitat, 509.996.5005

  • ARTWORK AND POETRY

    All artwork featured in this calendar was created by students and artists through Methow Arts Alliance Programs.

    The calendar features an array of artwork spanning over eleven years. The Education Program reaches over 5,600 students and 375 teachers in seven school districts in Okanogan County and Bridgeport.

    Featured blockprints were created by Methow Valley 5th grade students who �����������������������������from local ecologists. They then worked with local artists to develop images that ����������������������������������artwork is exhibited throughout the community in displays, annually on ���������������������������������������Fishing Day.

    Funding and support is provided by MRC partners and the Washington Department of Ecology, Bonneville Environmental Foundation, the Methow Valley School District, Washing-ton State Arts Commission, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Community Foundation of North Central Washington, Methow Valley Fund, PSFA and many local sponsors and generous members.

    Calendar design and layout by Amanda Jackson Mott, Executive Director, Methow Arts Alliance. Information on arts education and community outreach art programs: [email protected], 509.997.4004

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    population and habitat retsoration in the Methow Watershed. The MRC serves as

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    to working together to improve watershed health. MRC holds monthly meetings

    on the third Tuesday of each month. These meetings are open to the public,

    and the MRC encourages public participation and involvement.

    This year’s calendar connects to ADVENTURES, ACTIVITIES AND INFORMATION tai lored to each month. Go onl ine and f ind interactive activi t ies, pr int outs, and suggested learning opportunit ies in our community. Just fol low the f ish and engage in learning. www.methowrestorat ioncouncil .org

    “Follow ME !”

    FOLLOW THE FISH!

    THE METHOW RESTORATION COUNCIL