MAINTAINING AVIATION LIFE SUPPORT ?· Maintaining Aviation Life Support Equipment ... an SOP for ALSE…

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<ul><li><p>FM 1-508</p><p>HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY</p><p>DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.</p><p>MAINTAINING AVIATION LIFESUPPORT EQUIPMENT</p></li><li><p>i</p><p>*FM 1-508Field Manual HeadquartersNo. 1-508 Department of the Army</p><p>Washington, DC, 1 March 2000</p><p>Maintaining Aviation Life Support Equipment</p><p>ContentsPage</p><p>PREFACE ................................................................................................................... ivChapter 1 THREAT</p><p>Threat Characteristics.............................................................................................. 1-1General Threats to Aviation Maintenance Units ...................................................... 1-2Specific Threats to Aviation Life Support Equipment............................................... 1-2</p><p>Chapter 2 AVIATION LIFE SUPPORT EQUIPMENT CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS FORCONDUCTING DECISIVE OPERATIONSMaintenance Management ...................................................................................... 2-1Maintenance Responsibilities................................................................................... 2-3Aviation Life Support Equipment Budget ................................................................. 2-4Aviation Life Support Equipment Source Agencies ................................................ 2-5Maintenance Inspections ......................................................................................... 2-5Maintenance Scheduling.......................................................................................... 2-6Aviation Life Support Equipment Status Board........................................................ 2-9Life Support Equipment Inspection Calendar .......................................................... 2-9Maintenance Management Files............................................................................ 2-10Maintenance Library Update ................................................................................. 2-11Equipment Accountability and Control .................................................................. 2-11Equipment and Component Storage...................................................................... 2-13</p><p>DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.</p><p>*This publication supersedes FM 1-508, 12 January 1990.</p></li><li><p>FM 1-508</p><p>ii</p><p>Page</p><p>Chapter 3 AVIATION LIFE SUPPORT EQUIPMENT SHOPDesign ..................................................................................................................... 3-0Location ................................................................................................................... 3-0Work Area................................................................................................................ 3-0Storage Area ........................................................................................................... 3-1Fitting Area............................................................................................................... 3-1Office Space ............................................................................................................ 3-1Shop Equipment....................................................................................................... 3-1Environmental Control Standards ............................................................................ 3-1Personal Hygiene .................................................................................................... 3-1Shop Safety ............................................................................................................. 3-2</p><p>Chapter 4 PUBLICATIONS MANAGEMENTSection I Army PublicationsProcurement ............................................................................................................ 4-1Forms ...................................................................................................................... 4-1Publications Library.................................................................................................. 4-1Publications Disposal .............................................................................................. 4-1Excess Publications ................................................................................................. 4-2Section II Interservice PublicationsAir Force and Navy Publications .............................................................................. 4-2Air Force Accounts................................................................................................... 4-5Navy Accounts ......................................................................................................... 4-7</p><p>Chapter 5 EQUIPMENT RECORDSForms and Records ................................................................................................ 5-0Record Types........................................................................................................... 5-0Record Replacement .............................................................................................. 5-0Blank Forms............................................................................................................. 5-1</p><p>Chapter 6 SUPPLYPublications ............................................................................................................. 6-0Aviation Life Support Equipment Requests ............................................................. 6-1Forms ...................................................................................................................... 6-2Documentation ........................................................................................................ 6-9Standard Form 364 (Report of Discrepancy [ROD]) .............................................. 6-10Prescribed Load List ............................................................................................. 6-10Expendable Supplies and Repair Parts ................................................................. 6-11</p></li><li><p>Maintaining Aviation Life Support Equipment</p><p>iii</p><p>Page</p><p>Chapter 7 AVIATION LIFE SUPPORT EQUIPMENT SURVIVAL TRAINING PROGRAMSurvival Training Requirements .............................................................................. 7-0Survival Training Courses........................................................................................ 7-1</p><p>Appendix A SAMPLE STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR AVIATIONLIFE SUPPORT EQUIPMENT SHOP .....................................................................A-0</p><p>Appendix B SHOP ILLUSTRATIONS AND SUGGESTIONS .....................................................B-0Appendix C SHOP EQUIPMENT ................................................................................................C-0Appendix D EQUIPMENT FORMS AND RECORDS..................................................................D-1</p><p>GLOSSARY ................................................................................................. Glossary-0BIBLIOGRAPHY.....................................................................................Bibliography-1INDEX ............................................................................................................... Index-0</p></li><li><p>iv</p><p>PrefaceAviation life support equipment (ALSE) is designed to sustain aircrews andpassengers throughout the flight environment. It does this by increasing theirmission effectiveness and providing a means of safe and reliable escape, descent,survival, and recovery in emergency or combat situations.</p><p>FM 1-508 is written for peacetime and all dimensions of battlespaceenvironments. It applies to commanders and aviation unit maintenance, aviationintermediate maintenance, depot, and operations personnel.</p><p>The ultimate goal of this manual is to establish a standardized ALSE maintenanceprogram and support the need for an adequate shop. Appendixes A through Dprovide supplemental material, an SOP for ALSE shops, shop illustrations andsuggestions, shop equipment, and equipment forms and records.</p><p>The proponent for this publication is Headquarters, US Army Training andDoctrine Command. Submit changes for improving this publication on DA Form2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) and forward it toCommandant, US Army Aviation Center, Aviation Life Support EquipmentCourse, ATTN: ATZQ-BDE-EH, Fort Rucker, Alabama 36362.</p><p>Unless otherwise stated, whenever the masculine gender is used, both men andwomen are included.</p><p>This publication has been reviewed for operations security considerations.</p></li><li><p>1-1</p><p>Chapter 1</p><p>ThreatA multipolar threat from many sources has replaced the bipolar threatthat dictated our military posture for many years. The United Statesretains global strategic interests, including obligations to friends andallies who may face significant threats from within their own regions.While the threat of a worldwide, high-intensity conflict has dramaticallydiminished, the threat of increasingly lethal regional conflicts hasincreased.</p><p>THREAT CHARACTERISTICS</p><p>1-1. Army aviation systems may be deployed worldwide to counter forceswith various mixes of weaponry, ranging from outdated and obsolete tomodern and increasingly sophisticated. The modern-day battlefield,regardless of location, will be characterized by unprecedented lethality.</p><p>1-2. Many of the major military powers are moving towards smaller, betterequipped, and better trained forces. Less-developed nations also can improvemilitary capabilities through greater access to military system technologiesand increased availability of advanced military equipment on theinternational market. The proliferation of complete new weapons systems istempered by a larger force capability perspective. Countries will modernizethe portion of the force that provides the greatest leverage against opponents.</p><p>1-3. The fact that many countries do not acquire corresponding maintenanceand resupply capabilities with new weapons and sustainment is questionable.What may result is a belligerent power with a predominantly low-technologyforce with high-technology niches that increase the overall lethality of hisforce. This is accomplished in many cases to establish regional dominanceover another regional power. This low-technology/limited high-technologyenvironment does not translate into a low-threat environment for Armyaviation.</p><p>1-4. Many possible hostile forces, especially paramilitary, militias, roguemilitaries, bandits, terrorists, narco-criminals, and other nonstate threats,usually will maintain low-technology weapons systems; however, in somecases they may possess limited high-technology weapons equaling orsurpassing US capabilities. This possibly may create the most challengingthreat. Army aviation forces must be prepared continually to face a variety ofthreat forces, many with credible military capabilities.</p></li><li><p>FM 1-508</p><p>1-2</p><p>GENERAL THREATS TO AVIATION MAINTENANCE UNITS1-5. General threats to aviation maintenance units include</p><p> Conventional and improved conventional munitions (blast,fragmentation, incendiary) delivered by air, artillery, missile, or specialforces.</p><p> Nuclear munitions and side effects (electromagnetic pulse). Chemical and biological agents delivered by the enemy or brought in on</p><p>contaminated equipment.</p><p> Radio-electronic weapons that include lasers, microwave directionfinders, and other high-technologic systems.</p><p> Indirect threats that affect operations of aviation maintenance toinclude Disruption of command, control, and communications, including</p><p>destroying them.</p><p> Disruption or destruction of lines of communication and haltingthe flow of supplies, fuel, parts, and so forth.</p><p> Contamination of supplies, food, water, and so forth, by chemical,biological, nuclear, or radio-electronic means.</p><p>1-6. FM 1-500 covers the threat to aviation maintenance units in general.</p><p>SPECIFIC THREATS TO AVIATION LIFE SUPPORT EQUIPMENT1-7. The threats specifically to the ALSE shop include the ground and airthreat to the unit site plus the threat brought to the site on ALSE to berepaired. The latter threat is primarily from nuclear, chemical, or biologicalresidue but could include unexploded munitions and sabotaged equipment.</p><p>1-8. Residue from nuclear, chemical, or biological munitions arriving at theALSE shop by nature will be persistent agents. Detection of this residue maynot be possible with equipment available. Debriefing of pilots or othermaintenance personnel will assist in determining whether the equipment iscontaminated. Persistent agents are primarily blister or nerve agents.Personnel absorb these agents through the skin. Blister agents will causetemporary injury or disability. Nerve agents are extremely toxic and a smalldrop could kill within 20 minutes. Awareness of this threat is essential tomaintenance survival.</p><p>1-9. Equipment recovered from downed aircraft could conceal liveammunition or boobytraps. Shop personnel could become casualties from thistype of combat residue. Awareness of the possible dangers that could enterthe ALSE shop is half the battle in preventing maintenance casualties.Proper protective gear and detectors, or inspection of damaged equipment,should keep Army maintenance components functioning and contributing toall decisive operations.</p></li><li><p>2-1</p><p>Chapter 2</p><p>Aviation Life Support Equipment Concept of Operations forConducting Decisive Operations</p><p>Operating in all dimensions of the battlespace may require the unit toreadjust its ALSE maintenance functions. The concepts and practicesdiscussed in the following chapters should be used as guidelines formanaging the unit ALSE program. Some areas may require modification,however, to meet the unit's mission. Army aviation battlespace doctrinehas a significant effect on AVUM and AVIM ALSE operations. ALSEtechnicians should review FM 1-500 for information on tactics,techniques, and procedures for Army aircraft maintenance. Specifically,they should review chapters 2 and 3 for additional information on Armyaviations structure, relationships, and command, control, andcommunications concepts.</p><p>MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT</p><p> AVIATION LIFE SUPPORT EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE, A CRITICAL FACTOR2-1. Proper ALSE assets are critical factors in the aircrew member's abilityto maintain battlefield mobility and survivability. Especially important arethe maintenance and repair of ALSE systems and components.</p><p>2-2. Working in any type of aviation environment is challenging. However, itis even more critical for the unit ALSE program to remain functional in thebattlespace environment where there is an extricable linkage betweenmaneuver and fires. Also, attaining the maintenance objective becomes morechallenging as the unit realizes personnel resource limitations.</p><p>2-3. The unit's primary maintenance objective is to maintain availableaircraft to accomplish its mission. ALSE maintenance becomes a secondaryobjective as the ALSE technician's primary MOS, or job, is maintainingaircraft or performing other aviation-related tasks. With personnel andfinancial resource...</p></li></ul>

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